Hofbauer cell

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Hofbauer cells (pronounced )are oval eosinophilic histiocytes[1] with granules and vacuoles found in the placenta, which are of mesenchymal origin, in mesoderm of the chorionic villus, particularly numerous in early pregnancy.

Etymology[edit]

They are named after J. Isfred Isidore Hofbauer, an American gynecologist. (1878-1961)[1]

Function[edit]

They are believed to be a type of macrophage[2][3] and are most likely involved in preventing the transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus (so-called vertical transmission). Although there are many studies concerning placental vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, there has been a lack of evidence on the possible roles of Hofbauer cells in these processes.[4]

Histology[edit]

Micrograph of chorionic villi with Hofbauer cells. H&E stain.

Under histology sections, Hofbauer cells have appeared with discernible amount of cytoplasm.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Venes, Donald (2006). Taber's cyclopedic medical dictionary (Ed. 20, illustrated in full color. ed.). Philadelphia [Pa.]: Davis Co. ISBN 0-8036-1208-7. 
  2. ^ Wood, GW. "Mononuclear phagocytes in the human placenta.". Placenta 1 (2): 113–23. doi:10.1016/s0143-4004(80)80019-1. PMID 7003580. 
  3. ^ Zaccheo, D.; Pistoia, V.; Castellucci, M.; Martinoli, C. (1989). "Isolation and characterization of Hofbauer cells from human placental villi.". Arch Gynecol Obstet 246 (4): 189–200. doi:10.1007/bf00934518. PMID 2482706. 
  4. ^ Seval, Y.; Korgun, ET.; Demir, R. "Hofbauer cells in early human placenta: possible implications in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.". Placenta 28 (8-9): 841–5. doi:10.1016/j.placenta.2007.01.010. PMID 17350092.