Hole in the Head

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This article is about the Sugababes song. For the 1959 film, see A Hole in the Head. For the fish disease, see Head and lateral line erosion.
"Hole in the Head"
Single by Sugababes
from the album Three
B-side "Who"
"This Ain't a Party Thing"
Released 13 October 2003
Format CD single, vinyl single,
digital download
Genre Pop, R&B
Length 3:38
Label Island
Writer(s) Brian Higgins, Miranda Cooper, Tim Powell, Nick Coler, Niara Scarlett, Keisha Buchanan, Mutya Buena, Heidi Range
Producer(s) Brian Higgins, Xenomania, Jeremy Wheatley
Sugababes singles chronology
"Shape"
(2003)
"Hole in the Head"'
(2003)
"Too Lost in You"
(2003)

"Hole in the Head" is a song performed by British girl group Sugababes, released on October 13, 2003 as the lead single from their third studio album Three. It was written by Brian Higgins, Miranda Cooper, Tim Powell, Nick Coler, Niara Scarlett, Keisha Buchanan, Mutya Buena, and Heidi Range, and co-produced by Higgins and Jeremy Wheatley. The song was met with acclaim from critics and was a commercial success, entering the top 10 in other ten countries. It became their first (and only to date) single to reach the US charts peaking at number 96 on the billboard hot 100 and number 1 on the US dance chart though Round Round entered 7 on the US dance chart.

A 23 second audio sample of "Hole in the Head".

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Background and development[edit]

"Hole in the Head" was written by Brian Higgins, Miranda Cooper, Tim Powell, Nick Coler and Niara Scarlett, in collaboration with the Sugababes' members—Keisha Buchanan, Mutya Buena and Heidi Range, for the group's third studio album, Three.[1] Higgins and Jeremy Wheatley produced the song in conjunction with the songwriting and production team Xenomania, which was founded by Higgins himself.[1] Wheatley also completed the song's mixing process at the Townhouse Studios in London.[1]

Composition[edit]

"Hole in the Head" is an uptempo pop song, with influences of R&B.[2][3] K. Ross Hoffman of Allmusic described it as "a slice of bouncy, slightly off-kilter up-tempo pop".[4] According to the digital sheet music published by EMI Music Publishing, "Hole in the Head" was composed in the key of F sharp minor at a tempo of 125 beats per minute.".[5] The Sugababes' vocal range in the song spans from the lower note of F3 to the higher note of D5.[5] It follows the chord progression Bm—F♯m—A—E.[5] "Hole in the Head" draws musical influences from German vocal group Boney M. and the "swagger rock" of American recording artist Madonna.[6] The song incorporates dance beats, guitars and techno effects.[7] "Hole in the Head" is reminiscent of the Sugababes' previous single "Round Round", which was also produced by Xenomania.[4]

Critical reception[edit]

"Hole in the Head" received general acclaim from music critics. K. Ross Hoffman of Allmusic compared the song to the Sugababes' previous number one single "Freak like Me" and called it "no less enjoyable" than the latter.[4] A writer from NME wrote that "Hole in the Head" showcases the Sugababes' "twin strengths", and applauded their vocal performance in the song.[8] The Guardian's Dorian Lynskey praised Xenomania's production of "Hole in the Head", as well as the song's "sling-yer-hook skank".[9] Peter Robinson of the same publication described the song as an "incendiary" lead single.[10] Alan Braidwood of the BBC regarded the song as "quality pop" in conjunction with several other tracks from the album.[11] Al Fox, also from the BBC, described the song's hook as "instantaneous splendour".[12] Fiona Shepherd of The Scotsman and a writer from Daily Mirror both praised "Hole in the Head" for its catchiness.[13][14] Nick Southall of Stylus Magazine noted that the Sugababes utilised "irresistible" harmonies in the song.[15] Dan Gennoe of Yahoo! Music called the track "seductive",[16] while Alex Fletcher from Digital Spy noted the song's "spiky attitude".[17] Pat Blashill of Rolling Stone wrote that "Hole in the Head" "clip-clops along like Destiny's Child on diet soda".[18]

Commercial performance[edit]

"Hole in the Head" gained popular radio and television airplay after its release in the UK and was in close competition with "Turn Me On" by Kevin Lyttle for the number one position on the UK Singles Chart.[19] The song eventually debuted at number one on the UK Singles Chart with sales of 58,452 copies, ending the Black Eyed Peas' six-week run at the top with their single "Where Is the Love?".[20][21] "Hole in the Head" spent thirteen weeks on the chart, and sold 185,000 copies in the UK by April 2010, ranking as their sixth highest-selling single in the country.[22][23] It was placed 76th on the UK's list of most popular radio songs of the 2000s.[24] "Hole in the Head" debuted and peaked at number two on the Irish Singles Chart, a position it held for two consecutive weeks.[25] It was barred from the pole position by the Black Eyed Peas' "Where Is The Love?".[26]

The song debuted at number nine on the Danish Singles Chart issue dated 24 October 2003.[27] Two weeks later, it peaked at number one, and in turn became the Sugababes' first and to-date only number-one single in Denmark.[27] "Hole in the Head" entered the Dutch Top 40 chart at number 22 and peaked at number two for three non-consecutive weeks.[28] The song spent 12 weeks in the chart's top ten,[28] and was placed 23rd on its 2003 list of best-performing singles.[29] On the Norwegian Singles Chart, "Hole in the Head" debuted at number six and peaked at number two for three non-consecutive weeks.[30] It spent a broken fourteen weeks in the chart's top ten.[30] The song reached number five on the Austrian Singles Chart and became the group's highest-charting single in Austria since "Overload", which peaked at number three in 2001.[31]

"Hole in the Head" made its first appearance on the Swedish Singles Chart on 5 December 2003 at number 17.[32] The song peaked at number seven in the issue dated 23 January 2004 and became the Sugababes' first top-ten entry in Sweden.[32] It peaked at number eight on the Swiss Singles Chart for two consecutive weeks,[33] and number nine on the German Singles Chart.[34] "Hole in the Head" became a top-twenty hit on the Belgium (Flanders) Ultratop chart,[35] Finnish Singles Chart,[36] and Hungarian Singles Chart.[37] The single debuted and peaked at number 25 on the Australian Singles Chart, where it charted for 12 weeks.[38] It was more successful on the New Zealand Singles Chart, where it peaked at number 11 for two non-consecutive weeks and charted for a total of 15 weeks.[39] Upon its release in the United States, "Hole in the Head" peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart,[40] number 24 on the Billboard Pop Songs chart,[41] and number 96 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[42]

Music video[edit]

The music video for "Hole in the Head" was directed by Matthew Rolston and filmed on various locations in London in September 2003. The video shows the girls wearing heavy make up whlie dressed in gothic-like clothing and accessories and dancing around. They are also shown dating a rock band called Erased with whom they go to a gig with. The girls discover the band getting intimate with other girls during the show. In the end, while the trio is performing in front of the crowd, the girls come out first grabbing the guys and throwing them off the stage and start damaging the instruments. There is an uncensored version of the video, with extra footage in it. Aside from being the original explicit version of the song, there is also a scene where Buchanan gives the middle finger to the camera.

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the liner notes of Overloaded: The Singles Collection.[1]

Charts[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Overloaded: The Singles Collection (liner notes). Sugababes. Island Records. 2006. 
  2. ^ "Single of the week". Daily Record. Trinity Mirror. 17 October 2003. Retrieved 8 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  3. ^ "Sugababes Civic Hall, Wolverhampton". Birmingham Mail. Trinity Mirror. 31 March 2008. Retrieved 10 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  4. ^ a b c Hoffman, K. Ross. "Three - Sugababes". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 8 December 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c "Sugababes – Hole in the Head Sheet Music". Musicnotes.com. EMI Music Publishing. 
  6. ^ Spiteri, Sharleen (1 November 2003). "Three is the magic number for the babes". Birmingham Post. Trinity Mirror. Retrieved 9 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  7. ^ "Singles of the week". Coventry Evening Telegraph. Trinity Mirror. 16 October 2003. Retrieved 10 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  8. ^ "Sugababes: Hole in the Head". NME. IPC Media. 13 October 2003. Retrieved 6 October 2011. 
  9. ^ Lynskey, Dorian (24 October 2003). "CD: Sugababes, Three". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  10. ^ Robinson, Peter (19 October 2003). "Top of the pops". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media. Retrieved 6 October 2011. 
  11. ^ Braidwood, Alan (23 September 2003). "Sugababes Three Review". BBC Music. BBC. Retrieved 6 October 2011. 
  12. ^ Fox, Al (16 March 2010). "Sugababes Sweet 7 Review". BBC Music. BBC. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  13. ^ Shepherd, Fiona (24 October 2003). "CD Of The Week: Sugababes: Three". The Scotsman. Johnston Publishing. Retrieved 8 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  14. ^ "Singles". Daily Mirror. Trinity Mirror. 13 October 2003. Retrieved 9 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  15. ^ Southall, Nick (27 October 2003). "Sugababes". Stylus Magazine. Todd Burns. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  16. ^ Gennoe, Dan (28 October 2003). "Sugababes – Three". Yahoo! Music. Yahoo! Inc. Archived from the original on 6 April 2004. Retrieved 26 June 2012. 
  17. ^ Fletcher, Alex (11 September 2007). "Sugababes: 'About You Now'". Digital Spy. Hearst Magazines UK. Retrieved 8 December 2012. 
  18. ^ Blashill, Pat (8 July 2004). "Sugababes: Three". Rolling Stone. Jann Wenner. Archived from the original on 13 October 2008. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Black Eyed Peas set to relinquish singles crown". Music Week. Intent Media. 14 October 2003. Archived from the original on 8 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  20. ^ "Melua and Sugababes top UK charts". Music Week. Intent Media. 3 October 2005. Archived from the original on 8 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  21. ^ "Sugababes end Black Eyes Peas' reign at number one". Music Week. Intent Media. 20 October 2003. Archived from the original on 8 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  22. ^ "Sugababes". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  23. ^ "Sugababes Official Top 20 Best Selling Singles". MTV UK. Viacom. Archived from the original on 4 August 2012. Retrieved 9 April 2012. 
  24. ^ "Rock DJs favour EMI as Robbie and Spiller top Noughties airplay chart". Music Week. Intent Media. 18 January 2010. Archived from the original on 8 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  25. ^ a b "Chart Track: Week 42, 2003". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  26. ^ "Chart Track". Irish Singles Chart. Irish Recorded Music Association. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  27. ^ a b c "Danishcharts.com – Sugababes – Hole in the Head". Tracklisten. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  28. ^ a b c "Sugababes - Hole In The Head". Dutch Top 40. Stichting Nederlandse Top 40. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  29. ^ a b "De Nederlandse Top 100" (PDF). Dutch Top 40 Stichting Nederlandse Top 40. Archived from the original on 9 December 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  30. ^ a b c "Norwegiancharts.com – Sugababes – Hole in the Head". VG-lista. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  31. ^ a b "Sugababes – Hole in the Head – Austriancharts.at" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  32. ^ a b c "Swedishcharts.com – Sugababes – Hole in the Head". Singles Top 60. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  33. ^ a b "Sugababes – Hole in the Head – swisscharts.com". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  34. ^ a b "Die ganze Musik im Internet: Charts, News, Neuerscheinungen, Tickets, Genres, Genresuche, Genrelexikon, Künstler-Suche, Musik-Suche, Track-Suche, Ticket-Suche – musicline.de" (in German). Media Control Charts. PhonoNet GmbH. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  35. ^ a b "Ultratop.be – Sugababes – Hole in the Head" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  36. ^ a b "Sugababes: Hole in the Head" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  37. ^ a b "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ – Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége" (in Hungarian). Rádiós Top 40 játszási lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  38. ^ a b "Australian-charts.com – Sugababes – Hole in the Head". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  39. ^ a b "Charts.org.nz – Sugababes – Hole in the Head". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  40. ^ a b "Sugababes – Chart History". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on 18 April 2013. Retrieved 18 April 2013. 
  41. ^ a b "Sugababes – Chart History". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on 18 April 2013. Retrieved 18 April 2013. 
  42. ^ a b "Sugababes – Chart History". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on 18 April 2013. Retrieved 18 April 2013. 
  43. ^ "Ultratop.be – Sugababes – Hole in the Head" (in French). Ultratip. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  44. ^ "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ – Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége" (in Hungarian). Dance Top 40 lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved 16 August 2012.
  45. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Sugababes – Hole in the Head" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  46. ^ "Archive Chart" UK Singles Chart. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  47. ^ "Jaaroverzichten – Single 2003". Dutchcharts.nl. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on 19 September 2011. Retrieved 12 April 2013. 
  48. ^ "Årslista Singlar - År 2003". Swedish Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  49. ^ "Schweizer Jahreshitparade 2003". Swiss Music Charts. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on 4 February 2004. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 
  50. ^ "Årslista Singlar - År 2004". Swedish Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 31 May 2012. 

External links[edit]