Holle (goddess)

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Holle is theorized to be an ancient Germanic supreme being who predates most of the Germanic pantheon, dating back to the Neolithic before Indo-European invasion of Europe.[citation needed] She also appears as "Frau Holle" ("Mother Hulda") in Grimm's Fairy Tale #24. Alternative names for this goddess include Holla, Holda, Hulda, Hilde, Hilda, and many others.[citation needed]

Urglaawe and Braucherei[edit]

Holle is one of the most well known goddesses in Braucherei and is, perhaps, the principal goddess of Urglaawe. In Germanic lore, she is seen in the falling snow and in the power of whirlwinds. She is seen as a compassionate goddess who also demands order in the home.[1]

According to Urglaawe philosophy, Holle guides the cycle of life, death, and rebirth in all areas of existence. She oversees that cycle in humans as well as in the earth. Thus, in modern times, the Jera rune is associated with her. In Hessia, a pond, known as Frau-Holle-Teich, features a beautiful statue of the goddess in a serene meadow. Mount Brocken is said to be her holy place in Europe, much as Hexenkopf, a mountain pillar located in Williams Township, Northampton County, PA, is her home in the Deitscherei.[2]

Urglaawe tradition, stemming from Braucherei oral lore, constructs the calendar of the spiritual year around Holle's activities. The spiritual calendar begins on October 31 (Allelieweziel) with her departure from this physical plane. In Urglaawe, Holle is seen as the leader (or sometimes a leader, along with Wudan) of the Wild Hunt and engages in numerous parades involving an entourage of spirits.[3]

Holle returns from the Wild Hunt on Walpurgisnacht. An oral tradition from Braucherei states that adherents are to open all doors and windows on that night in order to make it easier for Holle to inspect the home. Her return heralds the beginning of the Bright Half of the year.[4]

Holle has always been an active presence in the lore of Braucherei, particularly when the healing work involves a lost spirit, soul, or entity.[5]

Holle is of the Wane and is thus often compared to the goddess Nerthus. However, the god Njörðr, also known as Nadd, or Nodd, is not seen as a consort of Holle. Instead, Holle is believed to be the consort of Ewicher Yeeger. The perception of this relationship could stem from the relative proximity of the Blue Mountain to Hexenkopf.[6]

Citations[edit]

  • Grimm, Jacob; Grimm, Wilhelm (1972). The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales. New York: Pantheon. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L. and Ammerili Eckhart. A Dictionary of Urglaawe Terminology, p. 41. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, 2012
  2. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L. and Ammerili Eckhart. A Dictionary of Urglaawe Terminology, p. 41. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, 2012.
  3. ^ Chisholm, James. Grove and Gallows, p. 74. Smithville, TX: Runa-Raven Press, 2002.
  4. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L. and Ammerili Eckhart. A Dictionary of Urglaawe Terminology, p. 41. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, 2012.
  5. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L. and Ammerili Eckhart. A Dictionary of Urglaawe Terminology, p. 41. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, 2012.
  6. ^ Schreiwer, Robert L. and Ammerili Eckhart. A Dictionary of Urglaawe Terminology, pp. 41-42. Bristol, PA: Deitscherei.com, 2012.