Hollywood Heights, Los Angeles

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This article is about the neighborhood in Los Angeles, California. For the neighborhood in Dallas, see Hollywood Heights, Dallas.
Hollywood Heights
Neighborhood of Los Angeles
Hollywood Heights is located in Western Los Angeles
Hollywood Heights
Hollywood Heights
Location within Western Los Angeles
Coordinates: 34°06′29″N 118°20′33″W / 34.108136°N 118.34258°W / 34.108136; -118.34258
Country United States
State California
County Los Angeles
City Los Angeles
District Hollywood
ZIP code(s) 90068
Area code(s) 323

Hollywood Heights is a neighborhood in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California, bounded by the Hollywood Bowl on the north, Highland Avenue on the east, Outpost Estates on the west, and Franklin Avenue on the south.[1][2] It includes a number of notable historic homes and buildings and has been home to numerous people in the film and music industries, dating back to the silent film era.

History[edit]

Located in what was the northern part of the Rancho La Brea Mexican land grant in the 19th century, H.J. Whitley developed the neighborhoood as early as 1902 as part of his Hollywood-Ocean View Tract.[3][4]

Notable places[edit]

The Samuel Freeman House (1962 Glencoe Way) was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, supervised by Lloyd Wright, and furnished and expanded by Rudolph Schindler.[5][6][7] Built in 1923, it is one of four textile block houses built by Frank Lloyd Wright in Los Angeles between 1922 and 1924, and it has the world's first glass-to-glass corner windows. It was known as an avant-garde salon, and the list of individuals who spent significant periods of time there or lived in the house's two Schindler-designed apartments includes John Bovingdon, Beniamino Bufano, Xavier Cugat, Rudi Gernreich, Martha Graham, Philip Johnson, modernist artist Peter Krasnow, Bella Lewitzky, Jean Negulesco, Richard Neutra, Claude Rains, Herman Sachs, Galka Scheyer, Edward Weston, Olga Zacsek, and Fritz Zwicky.[8][9] It also served as an intellectual sanctuary for individuals blacklisted by the House Un-American Activities Committee.[10] It is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The High Tower (2178 High Tower Drive) is a five-story, private elevator built circa 1920 in the style of a Bolognese campanile. It provides access to a Streamline Moderne fourplex known as High Tower Court, built circa 1937. Architect Carl Kay designed both. The High Tower was featured in The Long Goodbye, The High Window, and Dead Again. It also leads to the Alta Loma Terrace neighborhood, which includes the Otto Bollman House – Lloyd Wright's first project, built in 1922 – and the B.A.G. Fuller House (6887 W. Alta Loma Terrace), which is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.[5][11][12][13][14][15]

The Yamashiro Historic District (1999 Sycamore Avenue) is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and consists of nine buildings, including the Yamashiro restaurant. It was built between 1911 and 1914 as a residence by two brothers, Adolph and Eugene Bernheimer, and is said to be a replica of a 17th-century palace in Yamashiro Province. It has a 600-year-old pagoda imported from Japan.[16] Many films and television shows have been filmed here, including Memoirs of a Geisha and Sayonara.[17] Richard Pryor, Pernell Roberts, Joe Flynn, and Jerry Dunphy lived on apartments on the grounds.[18][19] It hosts a farmers market between May and September.[20]

The Magic Castle (7001 Franklin Avenue) is a private nightclub for magicians and magic enthusiasts. It is the premier venue for magic in the United States and is the clubhouse for the Academy of Magical Arts.[5][21][22] Originally constructed in 1909 as a châteauesque mansion for banker, real estate developer, and philanthropist Rollin B. Lane, it is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

Highland-Camrose Bungalow Village (2103 N. Highland Avenue) is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Eagles' Don Henley and Bernie Leadon wrote "Witchy Woman" in a bungalow here shared by Linda Ronstadt and J.D. Souther.[23][24][25]

The Villa Bonita (1817 Hillcrest Road) is a Spanish Colonial Revival-style apartment building designed by architect Frank Webster and built in 1929.[26] It is on the National Register of Historic Places.[27] Residents have included actresses Emma Dunn, Lois Collier, and Ethelind Terry.[18][28]

Hollywood United Methodist Church (6817 Franklin Avenue) was designed by Thomas P. Barber and built from 1927 to 1930. It is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.[5][21][29] It is built on land that includes the location of William C. de Mille and daughter Agnes de Mille's first home in Hollywood.[30]

American Legion Post 43 (2035 N. Highland Avenue) is a distinctive example of Egyptian Revival and Moroccan Art Deco architecture. Designed by Weston & Weston architects and completed in 1929, the building is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.[5][31] Its members have included Gene Autry, Clark Gable, and Ronald Reagan.[32] It served as the venue for Los Angeles' longest-running play, Tamara, from 1984 to 1993.[33][34]

Las Orchidas Apartments (1903 N. Orchid Avenue) were built in 1929 and are an example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture. A Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, its residents have included Wilfred Buckland, Ellen Burstyn, Ray Heindorf, Arthur Lange, and Robert Vaughn.[18][35][36][37]

The DeKeyser Duplex (1911 N. Highland Avenue) was designed by Rudolph Schindler and completed in 1935.[38]

The Abraham Koosis House (1941 Glencoe Way) was designed by Raphael Soriano and completed in 1940.[29]

Koning Eizenberg's Hollywood Duplex (6947 and 6949 Camrose Drive) was built in 1990.[29] [39]

The End of the Road (2042 Pinehurst Road) is the name Carrie Jacobs-Bond gave to her home and was the title of her final book of poetry, published in 1940.[40]

The Franklin Garden Apartments (6917-6933 Franklin Avenue) were an example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture. Built in 1920, they became a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument on June 7, 1978, but were demolished on July 1, 1978, to expand the Magic Castle's parking lot.[41][42]

Notoriety[edit]

From February to April 1964, a ten-week standoff known as the "Siege of Fort Anthony" occurred between Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies and a former Marine named Steven Anthony, who was armed with a shotgun and challenging an eminent domain-based eviction from his home on Alta Loma Terrace.[43][44][45] After Anthony's arrest, his home was razed to make room for the Hollywood Museum, which was never built, and parking for the Hollywood Bowl. Bette Davis had lived in the same house when she first moved to Hollywood.[46]

On July 1, 1969, Charles Manson shot a drug dealer named Bernard Crowe in the home of Charles "Tex" Watson's ex-girlfriend, Rosina Kroner, in the Franklin Garden Apartments.[47] Crowe had threatened the Manson Family after being scammed out of $2500 by Watson. Crowe survived the shooting but did not report it to police. Ten years earlier, Manson had lived directly across the street at 6871 Franklin Avenue, in apartment 306 of what was then called the Bienvenue Hotel Apartments. At that time, he ran a bogus talent agency, 3-Star Enterprises, that also served as a front for a prostitution ring, and he was arrested twice in 1959 while living there.[48][49]

The Divine Light Mission in America was started in a house at 6861 Alta Loma Terrace. Its leader, Guru Maharaj Ji, spoke there in 1971 when he arrived in the United States from India at age 13.[50][51][52]

On February 22, 2001, Ashton Kutcher discovered his girlfriend stabbed to death in her home on Pinehurst Road by an alleged serial killer dubbed the Hollywood Ripper.[53][54]

Schools[edit]

Residents are zoned to Selma Avenue Elementary School, Bancroft Middle School (which contains a performing arts magnet), and Hollywood High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District.[55]

Hollywood Heights is also home to The Oaks School, a private elementary school (grades K-6) on the grounds of the Hollywood United Methodist Church.

Adjacent neighborhoods[edit]

Relation of Hollywood Heights to nearby areas:[1]

Notable residents (past and present)[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°06′29″N 118°20′33″W / 34.108136°N 118.34258°W / 34.108136; -118.34258