Holmes Regional Medical Center

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The Holmes Regional Medical Center is a not-for-profit hospital operated by Health First. It is located in Melbourne, Florida. It is a 514-bed facility, including the only level II trauma center in Brevard County.[1]

In 2010, the hospital had 38.8% of the patient admissions in the county, 23,250, twice what its nearest competitor in the county admitted.[2]

History[edit]

In 1928 Dr. Isaac Hay opened what is now considered the first local hospital from which the current hospital traces its origin.[3]

In 1933 Mr. and Mrs. John Rodes donated land for a hospital. A loan of $30,000 was obtained under the National Industrial Recovery Act for construction.[3]

In 1937, the new hospital opened on US 1.[3]

In 1953, James E. Holmes was elected to the Board of Governors, serving as its president for the next 25 years, until 1978.[3]

In 1954, bed capacity was increased to 60.[3]

In 1956, the city granted the hospital 10 acres (4.0 ha) on what is now the current site on Hickory Street.[3]

In 1962, the hospital expanded to 181 beds in a four story building.[3]

In 1963, there were 47 active and associate members. Hospital staff was 400.[3]

In 1966, the hospital cared for 10,421 patients, 1,420 new babies and 37,165 outpatients.[3]

In 1969, the north wing was added bringing the total capacity to 331 beds.[3]

In 1978, as Holmes retired from the board, the hospital was named after him.[3]

In 1983, 206 beds were added costing $43 million.[3]

In 1986, the hospital constructed what was then the region's only complete caridovascular program.[3]

In 2004, the hospital was listed in Money magazine as "one of America's top hospitals" for Intervention Cardiology and Stroke Care.[3]

From 2007 to 2009, the hospital was rated one of the top 50 hospitals in the country.[4]

In 2011, it had 55.1% of its admissions through the emergency room, less than any other hospital in Brevard and below the state average of 61.6%. Some of this difference can be explained by procedural differences in how hospitals admit patients.[5]

Procedures[edit]

In the year ending June 2010, there were 899 hospitalizations for angioplasty, the most selected surgery.[6]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Schweers, Jeff (March 18, 2009). State affirms center's safety, attorneys for Holmes say. Florida Today. 
  2. ^ Schwers, Jeff (March 22, 2011). "Viera's growth spurred need for new hospital". Florida Today (Melbourne, Florida). pp. 1A. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "From Humble Roots to Nation's Top 50". Merritt Island, Florida: Space Coast Medicine and Healthy Living. March–April 2009. pp. 97–99. 
  4. ^ McClung, Chuck (November 11, 2011). "Holmes president steps down". Melbourne, Florida: Florida Today. pp. 4B. 
  5. ^ McClung, Chuck (December 24, 2012). "Wuesthoff admissions mirror rest of Florida". Florida Today (Melbourne, Florida). pp. 1A. 
  6. ^ Jenks, Susan (22 February 2011). "Angioplasty tops popular surgeries". Florida Today (Melbourne, Florida). pp. 1D. 

Coordinates: 28°05′15″N 80°36′51″W / 28.0874231°N 80.6143055°W / 28.0874231; -80.6143055