Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton

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Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton
Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton, from the southeast
Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton is located in Cheshire
Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton
Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton
Location in Cheshire
Coordinates: 53°04′37″N 2°43′58″W / 53.0769°N 2.7327°W / 53.0769; -2.7327
OS grid reference SJ 510,535
Location Bickerton, Cheshire
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website Holy Trinity, Bickerton
History
Dedication Trinity
Consecrated 7 January 1840
Associated people Sir Philip Grey Egerton
Architecture
Status Parish church
Functional status Active
Heritage designation Grade II
Designated 12 January 1967
Architect(s) Edmund Sharpe
Architectural type Church
Style Gothic Revival
Groundbreaking 1839
Completed 1911
Construction cost £700
(£52,000 in 2014)[1]
Specifications
Materials Red sandstone,
slate roof
Administration
Parish Holy Trinity, Bickerton
Deanery Malpas
Archdeaconry Chester
Diocese Chester
Province York
Clergy
Rector Revd Canon Ian Arthan Davenport
Curate(s) Revd Antony John Dutton

Holy Trinity Church, Bickerton stands to the north of the village of Bickerton, Cheshire, England. The church is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building.[2] It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Chester, and the deanery of Malpas. Its benefice is combined with those of St Wenefrede, Bickley, St John, Burwardsley and All Saints, Harthill.[3]

History[edit]

The church was built as a chapel of ease to St Oswald's Church, Malpas in 1839 and was designed by the Lancaster architect Edmund Sharpe.[2] The land for the church was given by Sir Philip Grey Egerton. Public subscription raised £2,000. £700 of this (£52,000 in 2014)[1] was used to build the church, £300 was used for a minister's house, and the rest was invested to provide a stipend for the minister.[4] A grant of £120 was provided by the Incorporated Church Building Society. The church provided 268 seats.[5] It was consecrated by the Bishop of Chester on 7 January 1840.[4] Holy Trinity became a separate parish church in 1869.[2] A chancel was added in 1875–76 and a baptistry in 1911.[6]

Architecture[edit]

Exterior[edit]

The church is built in red sandstone with a slate roof. Its plan consists of a three-bay nave, a single-bay chancel and a small octagonal west baptistry. The vestry projection to the north and the organ chamber to the south give the church a cruciform plan. The baptistry has a pyramidal roof.[2]

Interior[edit]

The reredos is made of panelled oak. Also in oak are the pulpit, the organ case and the lectern. The octagonal font is in stone. On the nave walls are memorials in alabaster to former vicars of the church.[2] The stained glass in the baptistry is by Kempe and is dated around 1904; there is another window by Kempe on the south side of the church. There are also two windows dating from about 1940 by Trena Cox.[6] The two-manual organ was built by P. Conacher and Company of Huddersfield.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b UK CPI inflation numbers based on data available from Gregory Clark (2013), "What Were the British Earnings and Prices Then? (New Series)" MeasuringWorth.
  2. ^ a b c d e English Heritage. "Church of the Holy Trinity, Bickerton (1138611)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 March 2012 .
  3. ^ Holy Trinity, Bickerton, Church of England, retrieved 29 September 2009 
  4. ^ a b Hughes, John M. (2010), Edmund Sharpe: Man of Lancaster, John M. Hughes, p. 134 
  5. ^ Brandwood, Geoff; Austin, Tim; Hughes, John; Price, James (2012), The Architecture of Sharpe, Paley and Austin, Swindon: English Heritage, p. 211, ISBN 978-1-84802-049-8 
  6. ^ a b Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Hubbard, Edward; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2011) [1971], Cheshire, The Buildings of England, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, p. 139, ISBN 978-0-300-17043-6 
  7. ^ Bickerton Holy Trinity, British Institute of Organ Studies, retrieved 13 August 2008