Honey (Mariah Carey song)

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"Honey"
Single by Mariah Carey
from the album Butterfly
Released August 26, 1997
Format CD single, cassette single, 7" single, 12" single, VHS
Recorded February 1997
Genre
Length 4:59
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Mariah Carey, Puff Daddy, Stevie J, Q-Tip (The Ummah), Bobby Robinson, Stephen Hague, Ronald Larkins, Malcolm McLaren, Larry Price
Producer(s) Mariah Carey, Puff Daddy, Stevie J, Q-Tip (The Ummah)
Mariah Carey singles chronology
"Underneath the Stars"
(1996)
"Honey"
(1997)
"Butterfly"
(1997)
Butterfly track listing
"Honey"
(1)
"Butterfly"
(2)

"Honey" is a song by American singer-songwriter Mariah Carey from her sixth studio album, Butterfly. It was released as the lead single from the album on August 26, 1997. The song was written by Carey, Puff Daddy, Q-Tip and Stevie J, all of whom served as the song's producers as well. It samples "Hey DJ" by the World's Famous Supreme Team, and "The Body Rock" by the Treacherous Three. "Honey" was a re-defining song in Carey's career, pushing her further into hip-hop world. The song's lyrics describe the feeling the protagonist feels towards her lover, and compares the sensation to honey, and its overbearing sweetness.

The song was universally acclaimed by contemporary music critics, who called Carey's musical transition "genuine." The song experienced strong success in the United States, becoming Carey's third single to debut atop the Billboard Hot 100, a feat that has yet to be duplicated. The song stayed at number one for three weeks. "Honey" also reached number one in Canada, and hit the top ten in Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. In other most European countries, the song charted outside the top ten, not matching the success of Carey's previous singles.

"Honey" was nominated for two Grammy Awards at the 1998 Grammy Awards, for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance and Best R&B Song. Carey included the song in the set-list of various live shows and future tours, where she would sing both the original and remix versions.

"Honey" is well known for its accompanying music video, which presented a more sexual and less conservative image of Carey than had been previously seen. The video features Carey being held hostage in a mansion, which she escapes in a James Bond-themed plot. Subsequent scenes see Carey escaping her assailants on a watercraft, dancing aboard a ship with sailors, and frolicking on a beautiful island with her lover. The video garnered much controversy, as many comparisons were made between the video and the rumors of Carey's failing marriage. While Carey denied the comparisons were anything more than coincidence, many close friends including Walter Afanasieff, Carey's writing partner, felt they were more than obvious.

Background and recording[edit]

After the success of her urban crossover album Daydream, Carey began exerting more control over the creative aspects of her career.[1] In doing so, she began pursuing a more hip-hop oriented sound, something very different from anything she had recorded previously. However, she was still writing ballads with Afanasieff, but began looking for more hip-hop/R&B producers to helm part of her new project.[1] The song was recorded in February 1997.[2] After Carey began working on the song with Q-Tip, they brought the lyrics, samples and melody over to Puff Daddy, who as a producer, had just earned his second number one single on the Hot 100 with "Mo Money Mo Problems."[1] Due to rumors of Puffy's overbearing nature, Carey recorded her vocals separately, until she gave him a few demos to choose from. Puffy explained why Carey recorded her vocals separately, and his feelings regarding having worked with her:

A lot of people feel I'm overbearing, so I wasn't allowed in the studio when she did her vocals. I'm trying to work on that, I'm such a perfectionist, sometimes I don't give people the chance to breathe. So I've been banned from a lot of studios. Mariah [recorded "Honey"] until she thought it was perfect, like a hundred times. She gave me like a hundred tracks to choose from.[1]

Puffy expressed his respect for Mariah and her craft, mentioning that she re-did her vocals many times until she felt they were perfect. After they had the vocals, Carey and Puffy began working on the song's hook and incorporating the music samples and blending them into the bridge and chorus.[1] After the song was completed, Combs was very confident with the song, calling it "slammin," but because of its heavy hip-hop influence, he felt only cautiously optimistic about the song's commercial success.[3] On a more personal note, "Honey" served as Carey's first single after her separation from estranged husband, Tommy Mottola, who also lead her current record label, Columbia.[1]

Composition[edit]

The song that led Carey into a hip-hop and R&B influence, and became her twelfth number-one chart topper on the Hot 100.

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"Honey" is an up-tempo song, that blends hip hop and contemporary R&B genres.[4] The song is set in the signature common time, and is written in the key of E major. It features a basic chord progression of A-F-1.[5] Carey's vocal range in the song spans from the note of C3 to the high note of B5; with the piano and guitar pieces range from G3 to G5.[5] The song's remix featured rap leads from The Lox and Mase, with some vocals rapped by Combs himself. The track was very different from anything Carey had ever recorded, and was described as "street Hip-Hop music, with a booming bass."[4] The song's melody was driven by Q-Tip's drum programming and Stevie J's keyboard notes. Combs's production gave the song a "light and airy" effect, further distancing it from Carey's contemporary sound.[4] "Honey" featured musical samples from Treacherous Three's "The Body Rock," and "Hey DJ" from the World's Famous Supreme Team.[4] The track united hip-hop and R&B with traces of pop music and was described as a "[song with a] catchy chorus, combining hip-hop and R&B into something that simply wasn't going to be denied by anyone, and offering a powerful start to a record."[4] According to author Chris Nickson, "Honey" revealed a more confident and independent side to Carey that had never been presented in her previous work. The song truly embodied a more mature and confident woman, with sultrier lyrics and a thumping hip-hop beat to accompany it.[1]

Critical reception[edit]

"Honey" garnered acclaimed response from contemporary music critics. David Browne from Entertainment Weekly described the importance the song held for Carey's musical transition. He wrote "You're prepared for a song on which Carey finally breaks free of her adult-contemporary chains and gets down." He felt "Honey" sounded as "anyone striking out on his or her own — caught between old and new habits and taking cautious baby steps into the future." Browne also commented that Carey showed a commendable vocal restraint in the song, "showing some admirable restraint, she nestles herself into the downy-soft beats of "Honey."[6] Author Chris Nickson felt the single's importance was "well beyond its chart placing" and that the single was one of the most important songs in Carey's career, enabling her to transition into R&B and hip-hop. Nickson commented that before, Carey was seen as a pop singer with R&B tendencies, but "Honey" changed that idea, giving the singer "hip-hop credibility", and forced naysayers to "take another look."[7] Rich Juzwiak from Slant complimented the song, calling it "awakening, both sensually and musically."[8] Juzwiak concluded the review writing "Honey exemplifies the abrupt gear shifting that appreciating Mariah the artist requires. Its new pop brilliance doesn't always come easy, where detecting it depends on the audience's newfound ability to apply Carey's pop life to her pop music."[8] "Honey" was nominated for two Grammy Awards at the 1998 ceremony, for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance and Best R&B Song. The song did not win either nomination, a typical trend of Carey's nominations at the Grammys.[7]

"Honey" won many prestigious awards throughout the music industry in 1997 and 1998. The song was nominated at the 1998 Grammy Awards for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance and Best R&B Song.[9] Additionally, the song won the BMI Pop Award for "Songwriter."[9]

Chart performance[edit]

"Honey" became Carey's third single to debut atop the Billboard Hot 100; the most debuts of any artist to this day.[10] Additionally, the song became her 12th chart topper, breaking the fifth place record she had shared with Whitney Houston and tying Madonna.[11] It replaced "Mo Money Mo Problems" by The Notorious B.I.G. featuring Puff Daddy and Mase, and it was replaced by Boyz II Men's "4 Seasons of Loneliness."[11] At this point, Carey was tied with The Supremes for fourth most US number ones, behind Michael Jackson with thirteen, and Elvis Presley and The Beatles with 17 and 20, respectively.[11] "Honey" was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), denoting shipments of over one million units.[12] The song stalled at number two on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, spending 21 weeks in the chart.[13] "Honey" finished number 32 on the Billboard end of year chart for 1997.[14] In Canada, the song debuted on the RPM Singles Chart at forty-eight on the RPM issue dated August 18, 1997,[15] and reached the top of the chart on September 22, 1997.[16] It was present on the chart for a total of 20 weeks,[17] and ranked 18 on the RPM Year-end chart for 1997.[18]

The song debuted on the UK Singles Chart on September 6, 1997 at its peak of number three, and spent a total of eight weeks in the chart.[19] "Honey" is Carey's 15th best-selling single in the United Kingdom as of 2009, with estimated sales of over 165,000.[20] In Australia, "Honey" peaked at number eight on the charts, spending a total of 19 weeks in the chart. It was certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA), denoting shipments of over 35,000 units.[21][22] In New Zealand, the song peaked at number three, and stayed in the chart for 14 weeks.[23] The song's success in most other worldwide markets was moderate, with it not reaching the same peaks as Carey's previous singles. While "Honey" peaked at number 12 in Finland, it fell dropped out of the chart the next week, spending a total of only one week in the chart.[24] In Sweden, the song performed well, peaking at number eight and staying within the chart for ten weeks.[25] In Austria and France, "Honey" peaked at number 39, spending one and four weeks on the charts, respectively.[26][27] The song peaked at number 29 and 30 in Belgium Flanders and Wallonia.[28][29]

Music video[edit]

A woman emerging from a swimming pool.
Carey in the music video. Carey is seen rising out of the pool, which became one of the most iconic moments in Carey's videos[10]

Aside from the attention surrounding the song, the music video garnered much speculation. For the first time in her career, Carey was featured provocatively dressed, giving viewers a "taste of the freer Mariah."[7][30] The Puerto Rico-filmed video's concept was created by Carey with Paul Hunter filling in as the director.[30] Serving a James Bond theme, Carey was cast as "the very sexy agent M", a woman who escapes a large mansion in which she has been held captive.[30] Carey said of the video that "I don't really think the video is overtly sexual, but for me-I mean people used to think I was the nineties version of Mary Poppins!"[4]

The video premiered on MTV and BET in September 1997 and was shot in Puerto Rico on July 26, 1997.[10] The video begins with Carey, playing as "Agent M," being held hostage in a large mansion. The captors are played by Eddie Griffin, Frank Sivero, and Johnny Brennan of The Jerky Boys, who continue to taunt Carey over her capture and eventual death.[10] "Agent M" speaks in Spanish to the captors, saying she can not understand them. After a series of dialogue, Carey escapes her Griffin's character and dives into a swimming pool from the mansion's roof. After an ensemble change, Carey dons a swimsuit and escapes the island via a watercraft.[10] The video's antagonists continue their pursuit of Carey throughout a large body of water, until she arrives aboard a large ship. It is unclear if both scenes are happening separately or side by side. Throughout most of the video, Carey is seen posing on a large sailboat, while wearing a white bikini.[10] After boarding the ship, Carey begins dancing and is soon joined by a group of male sailors. After a sequence of dance light dance routines, Carey is seen on an island with her lover, male model David Fumero, and her real life dog, Jack. They frolic together on the island, while Carey happily enjoys her romance.[10]

"It was a grueling process; I'm not going to say it was easy. I got up at 3 A.M. every day, and worked until 9 in the morning the next day – for four hours in a row, swimming in my Gucci pumps! I can't say that I really jumped off the roof, but [I did] dive into the pool. But I did wear and swim in those pumps, and I was not happy"

—Carey, on her exhausting experience on the set of "Honey."[30]

During the time of the video's release, Carey and Mottola were in the midst of their divorce and this led to many speculation on the video's message. Tabloids and critics were linking the video's theme to Carey's marriage, writing how Mottola would lock Carey in their mansion.[7] While Carey denied the allegations, many found it to be very obvious. Carey's writing partner of six years, Afanasieff, felt the video was undeniably about Mottola.[30] While speculation about the video grew, Carey continued to deny any intention of portraying her marriage in the video.[7] In an interview, Carey said that "Tommy loves the video, he says it's my best video yet."[7]

The song's Bad Boy remix featured a different music video as well.[7] It features the same concept, however not emphasizing on the kidnapping and escape. The video begins with Carey diving into the pool, and driving a watercraft. As she reaches a point far into the body of water, she is offered a rope lift from a helicopter.[11] After she accepts and ascends the line, Carey boards the aircraft alongside its pilots, Puffy and the members of Bad Boy Entertainment. Other scenes sequence Carey dancing with Puffy in a golden indoor tunnel. As the video concludes, more staff from the helicopter join Carey in the golden entryway, as they dance and enjoy themselves.[11]

Remixes[edit]

Several remixes were commissioned for "Honey," most notably the Bad Boy remix and the Classic mix, the latter of which appears on Carey's remix compilation The Remixes (2003). The former is similar to the original version, with the addition of a new spoken intro from Carey in which she states, "I thought I told you, we won't stop."[10] The string chords present in the original "Honey" are entirely excised from the Bad Boy remix, and it features rapping verses by The Lox and Mase (who did the bridge on the original version). The rap from Mase entirely replaces the second chorus of the song, while the Lox's parts replaces a section of the song's bridge.[10] The song's main remix, "Honey" (Bad Boy remix), has an accompanying music video, with additional sequences directed by Paul Hunter.[10] Much of the footage from the video is from the original, with few new scenes featuring Carey with Puffy, Mase and the Lox in a long golden tunnel flowing with water ("The Honey Tunnel"). During Mase's rap, Carey is rescued by them (rather than joining the sailors on the boat) when he lowers a rope into the ocean from his helicopter.[10]

Another major hip-hop mix of the song was released: "Honey" (So So Def mix), produced by Jermaine Dupri and featuring rap verses from him and Da Brat.[7] Carey re-recorded some of her vocals, but most lyrical and melodic structures were kept similar to the album version. The song uses a new sample from "It's Great to Be Here" (originally performed by The Jackson 5), but it does not use "The Body Rock" melody from the album version and Bad Boy remix.[7] The So So Def remix does use the sample of "Hey DJ," but in a different manner: both the album and Bad Boy remixes use the piano riff from "Hey DJ," while the So So Def remix uses the line "Hey JD, won't you play that song, keep them dancing, dancing all night." David Morales created several dance remixes of the song, the most notable being "Honey" (Classic mix), and variations of this include "Honey" (Def Club mix), "Honey" (Rascal dub), and "Honey" (Boss Anthem mix).[7] These give songwriting credit to the writers of "The Body Rock," although this is not sampled. Morales is also credited as a songwriter for the remixes, although they are close to the original melodic and lyrical structure of the original song.[7]

Live performances[edit]

"Honey" was performed on various live television appearances as well as most of Carey's tours. Carey first performed a mash-up of the song and the Bad Boy remix live on the British music chart program Top of the Pops in 1997.[4] The performance incorporated themes from both videos, in which Carey was dressed in the same white bikini from the music video. Additionally, the stage was set up to resemble the deck of a ship.[4] Dancers similar to the video joined Carey on stage as she performed the song. Carey performed "Honey" at the 1998 World Music Awards. The performance garnered her a standing ovation, and featured many male dancers, all donning sailor costumes. After the second verse, a large projection of the Bad Boy remix video played while pre-recorded rap verses from Puffy played. A live performance of the song was taped via satellite and aired live in Japan, featuring similar costumes and themes as the others.[4] Carey performed the song throughout her Butterfly World Tour (1998), which served as the accompanying tour for Butterfly.[4] During her live routine of the song, various male dancers donned in similar sailor outfits joined Carey on stage. Serving as an intro to the song, Carey re-enacts the hostage from the video, and formulates her escape. The song's performance in Taipei, Taiwan was used as the official act of the song on Carey's 1998 concert DVD, Around the World, which featured live tapings from Japan, Taiwan, Australia and the US.[4]

For her Rainbow World Tour (2000), the beginning of the original video served as the acts intro.[31] As the music began playing, Carey emerged wearing a mini sailor suit and a matching headpiece. During the set, many male dancers joined Carey on stage, and re-enacted a similar performance than that of her previous tour.[31] "Honey" was performed during Carey's following tour, the Charmbracelet World Tour (2002–2003).[32] The performances of the song throughout the tour were altered from those in 1997–98. The act began with the video intro like before, however the dancers featured, no longer bared any resemblance to the video.[32] Male and female dancers joined, performing traditional and exotic dance routines. Carey donned a blue one piece mini skirt, and joins with some light dance moves.[32] Carey continued performing the song throughout her 2006 tour, The Adventures of Mimi.[33] The performance did not include any video intro, but did introduce a four-piece of male dancers dressed in sailor outfits.[33] Carey wore a pair of black leggings, accompanied by a sparkling mini-bra. During the performance in Madison Square Garden, Carey was joined with Sean "Diddy" Combs (previously known as Puffy) on stage after the second verse.[33] During her Angels Advocate Tour (2010) performance of the song, Carey donned a sparkling mini-Herve Leger gown, with a faux-fur snug jacket.[34] During the song, male and female dancers joined her on stage, and performed up-tempo dance routines.[34]

Formats and track listing[edit]

CD Single[35]

  1. "Honey" (LP Version) – 4:59
  2. "Honey" (Bad Boy Remix) – 5:32

US CD Maxi Single[36]

  1. "Honey" (LP Version) – 4:59
  2. "Honey" (Bad Boy Remix) – 5:32
  3. "Honey" (Classic Mix) – 8:05
  4. "Honey" (So So Def Mix) – 5:11
  5. "Honey" (Classic Instrumental) – 7:32

UK CD Single Pt.1[37]

  1. "Honey" (LP Version) – 4:59
  2. "Honey" (Bad Boy Remix) – 5:32
  3. "Honey" (Smooth Version With Intro) – 4:47
  4. "Honey" (So So Def Mix) – 5:11

UK CD Single Pt.2[38]

  1. "Honey" (LP Version) – 4:59
  2. "Honey" (Classic Mix) – 8:05
  3. "Honey" (Morales Club Dub) – 11:01
  4. "Honey" (Mo' Honey Dub) – 7:24
  5. "Honey" (Classic Instrumental) – 7:32

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the Butterfly liner notes.[39]

  • Mariah Carey – vocals, songwriting, co-producing
  • Puff Daddy – songwriting, co-producing
  • Stevie J. – songwriting, co-producing
  • Q-Tip – songwriting, co-producing
  • Bobby Robinson – songwriting
  • Stephen Hague – songwriting
  • Ronald Larkins – songwriting
  • Malcolm McLaren – songwriting
  • Larry Price – songwriting

Charts[edit]

Preceded by
"Mo Money Mo Problems" by The Notorious B.I.G. featuring Puff Daddy and Mase
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
September 13, 1997 – September 27, 1997
Succeeded by
"4 Seasons of Loneliness" by Boyz II Men
Preceded by
"Get Up, Stand Up" by Phunky Phantom
Billboard Hot Dance Club Play number-one single
October 18, 1997
Succeeded by
"Never, Never Gonna Give You Up" by Lisa Stansfield

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Bronson 2003, p. 858
  2. ^ "Mariah Carey Rolls Out Crave Records". MTV Networks. MTV. 1997-02-19. Retrieved 2010-11-13. 
  3. ^ Shapiro 2001, p. 101
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Nickson 1998, p. 166
  5. ^ a b "Mariah Carey – Honey – Digital Sheet Music". Musicnotes.com. Alfred Publishing. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  6. ^ Browne, David (1997-09-19). "Music Review – Mariah Carey: Butterfly". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2010-09-07. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Nickson 1998, p. 162
  8. ^ a b Juzwiak, Rich (2003-12-18). "Music Review: Mariah Carey: Butterfly". Slant Magazine. Retrieved 2010-09-07. 
  9. ^ a b Shapiro 2001, pp. 161–163
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Nickson 1998, p. 176
  11. ^ a b c d e Nickson 1998, p. 163
  12. ^ "Gold & Platinum – May 30, 2010". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2010-05-30. 
  13. ^ "Mariah Carey: Chart History". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-09-12. 
  14. ^ a b "Billboard Top 100–1997". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-11-13. 
  15. ^ "Top Singles – Volume 65, No. 24, August 18, 1997". RPM. 1997-09-22. Retrieved 2010-09-13. 
  16. ^ a b "Top Singles – Volume 66, No. 3, September 22, 1997". RPM. 1997-09-22. Retrieved 2010-09-13. 
  17. ^ "Top Singles – Volume 66, No. 18, January 26, 1998". RPM. RPM Music Publications Ltd. 1998-01-26. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  18. ^ a b "RPM's Top 100 Singles Of 1997". RPM. 1997-12-15. Retrieved 2010-02-02. 
  19. ^ a b "Chart Stats > Mariah Carey – Honey". The Official Charts Company. Chartstats.com. Retrieved 2010-11-13. 
  20. ^ "Mariah Carey Official Top 20 Best Selling Singles in the UK". MTV Networks Europe. MTV (UK and Ireland). Retrieved 2010-11-10. 
  21. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". ARIA Charts (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  22. ^ Kent, David (2003). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. ISBN 0-646-11917-6. 
  23. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". New Zealand Singles Chart (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  24. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". Finland's Official List (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  25. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". Sverigetopplistan (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  26. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". Ö3 Austria Top 40 (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  27. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". French Singles Chart (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  28. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". Ultratop (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  29. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". Ultratop (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  30. ^ a b c d e Nickson 1998, p. 161
  31. ^ a b Argenson 2010, pp. 29–33
  32. ^ a b c Argenson 2010, pp. 38–42
  33. ^ a b c Argenson 2010, pp. 44–48
  34. ^ a b Argenson 2010, pp. 54–58
  35. ^ Honey (Austrian CD Single liner notes). Mariah Carey. Columbia Records. 1997. 664781 1. 
  36. ^ Honey (US CD Maxi-Single liner notes). Mariah Carey. Columbia Records. 1997. 44K 78665. 
  37. ^ Honey (UK CD Single Pt.1 liner notes). Mariah Carey. Columbia Records. 1997. 665019 2. 
  38. ^ Honey (UK CD Single Pt.2 liner notes). Mariah Carey. Columbia Records. 1997. 665019 5. 
  39. ^ Carey, Mariah (1997). Butterfly (Liner Notes) (Compact Disc). Mariah Carey. New York City, New York: Columbia Records. 
  40. ^ a b "Mariah Carey - Honey". Dutch Top 40 (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  41. ^ "Chartverfolgung/Carey, Mariah/Single" (in German). musicline.de PhonoNet. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ "Search The Charts". The Irish Charts. Irish Recorded Music Association. Retrieved 2010-10-23. 
  43. ^ "Hits of World". Billboard. 1997-09-27. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  44. ^ "Profile of Mariah Carey" (in Japanaese). Oricon. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  45. ^ "Hits of World". Billboard. 1997-10-11. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  46. ^ "Mariah Carey - Honey". Swiss Music Charts (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03. 
  47. ^ a b c d "Mariah Carey > Charts & Awards > Billboard Albums". Allmusic. Macrovision. Retrieved 2010-04-07. 
  48. ^ "ARIA Charts – End Of Year Charts – Top 100 Singles 1997". Australian Recording INdustry Association. Retrieved 2011-03-11. 
  49. ^ "Top 40 1997". Dutch Top 40. MegaCharts. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  50. ^ "Top Annuali Single: 1997" (in Italian). Federation of the Italian Music Industry. 
  51. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 1997 Singles". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 2013. 
  52. ^ "American single certifications – Mariah Carey – Honey". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2013.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]