Honeynet Project

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The Honeynet Project is a leading international security research organization, dedicated to investigating the latest attacks, developing open source security tools to improve Internet security and learning how malicious hackers behave. With Chapters around the world, The Project volunteers have contributed to fight against malware (such as Confickr), discovered new attacks and created security tools used by businesses and government agencies all over the world. After pioneering the use of honeynet technologies more than 10 years ago, the organization continues to be on the cutting edge of security research by working to analyze the latest attacks and educating the public about threats to information systems across the world. The project itself is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

History[edit]

The Honeynet Project began in 1999 as a small mailing list of a group of people. Over time, the group expanded and officially dubbed itself as the Honeynet Project in June 2000. Today it includes dozens of active chapters around the world,[1] including Brazil, Indonesia, Greece, India, Mexico, Iran, Australia, Ireland, and many in the United States. This gives the Project a more global approach to gathering its research and raising the awareness of information security.

The Project's Goals[edit]

The Honeynet Project focuses on three primary goals. The first is to raise awareness of the existing threats on the Internet. The second goal is to conduct research covering data analysis approaches, unique security tool development and gathering data about attackers and malicious software they use. The third goal is to provide the tools[2] and techniques used by the Honeynet Project so that other organizations can benefit.[3]

Research and Development[edit]

The Honeynet Project volunteers collaborate on security research efforts covering data analysis approaches, unique security tool development and gathering data about attackers and malicious software they use. The Project research provides critical additional information, such as their motives in attacking, how they communicate, when they attack systems and their actions after compromising a system. Such information is provided through Know Your Enemy whitepapers, The Project blog posts and Scan of the Month / Forensic challenges.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Groups directory | The Honeynet Project. Honeynet.org. Retrieved on 2013-10-30.
  2. ^ Projects | The Honeynet Project. Honeynet.org. Retrieved on 2013-10-30.
  3. ^ About The Honeynet Project | The Honeynet Project. Honeynet.org. Retrieved on 2013-10-30.

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  • For the Honeynet Project's brief history, see Spitzner, L. (2003). The Honeynet Project: Trapping the Hackers. IEEE Security & Privacy,,1(2) pp.  15-23.