Honor Rolls of Baseball

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The Honor Rolls of Baseball were established in 1946 by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum's Permanent Committee to establish as a second level of induction designed to recognize non-playing contributors.[1] The committee designed the Honor Rolls to commemorate managers, executives, umpires and sportswriters, as an addition to their regular vote of old-time players.[2] Though sportswriter Henry Chadwick was elected in 1938, the Hall had not devised a plan to extend recognition to these contributors, and this was the first attempt.[2]

On April 23, 1946, the Permanent Committee voted to induct 11 players into the Baseball Hall of Fame, along with 39 non-players into the Honor Rolls, separated into their respective category. This second-tier list consisted of 5 managers, 11 umpires, 11 executives and 12 sportswriters.[2]

Key[edit]

Name Name of the person by official records
Year inducted Year inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
§ Indicates that person was also player

Honor Rolls of Baseball recipients[edit]

Executives[edit]

Name Year inducted Notes Ref
Barrow, EdEd BarrowHall of Fame 1953 Barrow was the New York Yankees' President and general manager from 1920 to 1945. He was also the on-field manager for the Detroit Tigers from 1903 to 1904, and the Boston Red Sox from 1918 to 1920, which included their World Series victory in 1918. [3][4]
Barnard, ErnestErnest Barnard Barnard was the second President of the American League. His tenure lasted from 1927 to 1931. [5]
Bruce, JohnJohn Bruce Bruce was secretary of the National Commission, the forerunner of Baseball's Commissioner's Office, from 1903 to 1920. He was previously a legal counsel to the American League president, and was a part owner of St. Louis Browns from 1902 to 1916.
Brush, John T.John T. Brush Brush was the principal owner of both the Cincinnati Reds and the New York Giants. [6]
Dreyfuss, BarneyBarney DreyfussHall of Fame 2008 Dreyfuss owned the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise from 1900 to 1932. [7]
Ebbets, CharlesCharles Ebbets Ebbets was an owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers franchise, also serving as President and, for one season, the on-field manager. [8]
Herrmann, AugustAugust Herrmann Herrmann was an owner of the Cincinnati Reds franchise from 1902 to 1927. [9]
Heydler, JohnJohn Heydler Heydler started in Major League Baseball as an umpire, and later became the National League President in 1909, and then again from 1918 to 1934. [10][11]
Quinn, BobBob Quinn Quinn was the principal owner of the Boston Red Sox from 1923 to 1933. [12]
Soden, ArthurArthur Soden Soden was the National League President in 1882. [11]
Young, NicholasNicholas Young Young was a manager and umpire in the National Association before he became the National League President in 1885, an office he held until 1902. [11][13]

Managers[edit]

Name Year Inducted Notes Ref
Carrigan, BillBill Carrigan § Carrigan played 10 seasons with the Boston Red Sox from 1906 to 1916, and was also their manager from 1913 to 1916. He was a part of three World Series championship teams with Boston, two as their player-manager. He later returned as Boston's manager in 1927 and stayed until 1929. [14][15]
Hanlon, NedNed HanlonHall of Fame § 1996 Hanlon had a playing career that lasted from 1880 to 1892, and a managerial career that lasted from 1889 to 1907. As manager, he led his teams to 5 National League titles, three with the Baltimore Orioles and two with the Brooklyn Superbas. He later became part owner of the Brooklyn franchise. [16][17]
Huggins, MillerMiller HugginsHall of Fame § 1964 Huggins had a 13-year playing career that included time with the Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals. He began his managerial with the Cardinals, and later managed the New York Yankees from 1918 to 1929. As their manager, the Yankees made six appearances in the World Series, including four championships. [18]
Selee, FrankFrank SeleeHall of Fame 1999 Selee managed the Boston Beaneaters from 1890 to 1901, and claimed five National League championships. Later he managed the Chicago Cubs from 1902 to 1905. [19]
Ward, John MontgomeryJohn Montgomery WardHall of Fame § 1964 Ward had a 16-year playing career that lasted from 1878 to 1894, and was a manager for seven of those seasons. Was a part of three National League championship teams. He pitched the second perfect game in Major League Baseball history on June 17, 1880. [20][21]

Umpires[edit]

See also: Hall of Fame (umpires) and Retired numbers (umpires)
Name Year Inducted Notes Ref
Connolly, TomTom ConnollyHall of Fame 1953 Connolly's worked 32 of his 35-year career in the American League career. He also worked in eight World Series. [22]
Dinneen, BillBill Dinneen § Dinneen had a 12-year pitching career, then umpired in the American League for 30 years. In addition to his one World Series appearance as a player, he also umpired in eight. [23]
Emslie, BobBob Emslie § Emslie was a pitcher for three seasons before starting his umpiring career. His career lasted 35 seasons, 34 of which were with the National League, from 1890 to 1924. [24]
Evans, BillyBilly EvansHall of Fame 1973 Evans become the youngest umpire in history when he began his 22-year career at the age of 22 in the American League. He umpired in six World Series, and later became general manager of the Cleveland Indians and Detroit Tigers. [25][26]
Gaffney, JohnJohn Gaffney Gaffney's 14-year career as an umpire was interrupted for parts of two seasons when he managed the Washington Nationals in 1886 and 1887. [23]
Hurst, TimTim Hurst Hurst had an umpiring career that lasted 16 seasons from 1891 to 1909, during which he managed the St. Louis Browns for the 1898 season. [27]
Kelly, KickKick Kelly Kelly umpired eight seasons from 1882 to 1897. He managed the Louisville Colonels for the 1887 and 1888 seasons. [28]
Klem, BillBill KlemHall of Fame 1953 In Klem's 37-year National League career, he umpired 18 World Series and two all-star games. [29]
Lynch, ThomasThomas Lynch Lynch had an umpiring career that lasted 13 seasons from 1888 to 1902. Later, he became the National League President from 1910 to 1913. [11][30]
O'Loughlin, SilkSilk O'Loughlin O'Loughlin had an umpiring career that lasted 17 seasons in the American League from 1902 until his death in 1918. [31]
Sheridan, JackJack Sheridan Sheridan began his umpiring career with the Players' League in 1890, then in the National League sporadically until 1901 when he joined the American League and lasted until his death in 1914. [32]

Writers[edit]

Name Spink Award year Notes Ref
Barnes, WalterWalter Barnes After graduating from Harvard, Barnes joined the staff of The Boston Post in 1880. He was also a sports editor of The Boston Journal, the Boston Herald and The Boston Globe. When he retired in 1939, he was the oldest member of the BBWAA, holding card #1. [33]
Cross, HarryHarry Cross After attending Harvard College in 1905, Cross worked for various New York newspaper covering sports. He joined The New York Times from 1909 to 1920, and again from 1924 to 1925, then was the sports editor for the New York Evening post from 1920 to 1924, and the New York Herald Tribune from 1926 to 1941. He also worked for the New York Giants, and was a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame committee from June 1945 until his death in 1946. [34]
Hanna, William B.William B. Hanna After attending Lafayette College, Hanna worked for various New York newspaper covering sports. He first worked for The Kansas City Star before moving to New York. He was writer for the New York Herald in 1892 and the New York Press in 1893. He also wrote for The Sun for 16 years before he returned to the Herald. After 8 years, he moved over to the New York Herald Tribune and worked there until his death in May 1930. [35]
Hough, FrankFrank Hough Hough was a baseball writer for The Philadelphia Inquirer and was given part ownership of the Philadelphia Athletics when he lent money to Connie Mack so he could launch the team in 1901. He later sold his interest in the club to Mack and became sports editor of the Inquirer. [36]
Mercer, SidSid Mercer 1969 Mercer worked for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch before moving to New York and writing for The New York Evening Globe. He later became president of the BBWAA, and wrote for the New York Journal American until his death in 1945. The Sid Mercer-Dick Young Player of the Year Award, presented annually by the New York Chapter of the BBWAA, was named in his honor. [37]
Murnane, TimTim Murnane § 1978 Murnane played seven seasons from 1872 to 1878 for various major league franchises, then was player-manager for the 1884 Boston Reds of the Union Association. He later became a long-time sportswriter for The Boston Globe. [38][39]
Richter, FrancisFrancis Richter Richter's career as a baseball writer lasted from 1870 until his death in 1926. Influential in the development of sports journalism, he began writing for the Philadelphia Day, and the Sunday World. He later developed the first newspaper sports department at the Public Ledger. He founded the Sporting Life, an all-sports journal. [40]
Sanborn, IrvingIrving Sanborn Sanborn, a graduate of Dartmouth College, wrote for the Chicago Tribune for 40 years, retiring in 1930. He was one of the founding members of the BBWAA. [41]
Sheridan, John B.John B. Sheridan Sheridan, St. Louis sports writer, wrote for the Sporting News. [42]
Slocum, BillBill Slocum Slocum wrote for the New York Journal American, and was a ghostwriter for Babe Ruth. The William J. Slocum-Jack Lang Award, presented annually by the New York Baseball Writers Association to a person judged to have a long and meritorious service to baseball, was named in his honor. [43][44]
Tidden, GeorgeGeorge Tidden Tidden was a writer for the New York Journal American. [45]
Vila, JoeJoe Vila Vila was a writer for the New York Morning Sun, and later became the sports editor and columnist for the New York Evening Sun. [45]

References[edit]

General
  • Cook, William A. 2007. "August Garry Herrmann: A Baseball Biography". McFarland. ISBN 0-7864-3073-7.
  • James, Bill. 1995. "Whatever happened to the Hall of Fame?: baseball, Cooperstown, and the politics of glory". Simon and Schuster. ISBN 0-684-80088-8.
  • Lieb, Fred; Ritter, Lawrence. 1977. "Baseball As I Have Known It". University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0-8032-7962-0.
  • Redmount, Robert. 1998. "The Red Sox Encyclopedia". Sports Publishing LLC. ISBN 1-58261-012-6.
Specific
  1. ^ James, p. 46
  2. ^ a b c Fleitz, David L. (January 2006). "The Forgotten Honor Rolls of the National Baseball Hall of Fame". Baseball Research Journal #34. University of Nebraska Press. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 
  3. ^ "Ed Barrow's Career Statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-17. 
  4. ^ Ed Barrow at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Dan Levitt, retrieved 2009-11-17
  5. ^ "Ernest S. Barnard". baseballlibrary.com. The Idea Logical Company, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-17. 
  6. ^ John Brush at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by John Saccoman, retrieved 2009-11-17
  7. ^ Barney Dreyfuss at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Sam Bernstein, retrieved 2009-11-17
  8. ^ Charlie Ebbets at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by John Saccoman, retrieved 2009-11-17
  9. ^ Cook, p. 2
  10. ^ "John Heydler's career umpiring statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-17. 
  11. ^ a b c d Flemming, Frank. "National League Presidents". sportsecyclopedia.com. Tank Productions. Retrieved 2009-11-17. 
  12. ^ Redmount, p. 200
  13. ^ "Nicholas Young's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-17. 
  14. ^ "Bill Carrigan's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  15. ^ Bill Carrigan at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Mark Armour, retrieved 2009-11-18
  16. ^ "Ned Hanlon's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-17. 
  17. ^ Ned Hanlon at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Zack Triscuit, retrieved 2009-11-17
  18. ^ "Miller Huggins' career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  19. ^ "Miller Huggins' career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  20. ^ "Monte Ward's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  21. ^ "No Hitters Chronologically". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-18. 
  22. ^ "Tommy Connolly's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  23. ^ a b "Bill Dinneen's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  24. ^ "Bob Emslie's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  25. ^ "Billy Evans' career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  26. ^ Billy Evans at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by David Anderson, retrieved 2009-11-19
  27. ^ "Tim Hurst's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  28. ^ "Kick Kelly's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  29. ^ "John Gaffney's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  30. ^ "Thomas Lynch's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  31. ^ "Silk O'Loughlin's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  32. ^ "Jack Sheridan's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  33. ^ "Walter S. Barnes". baseballlibrary.com. The Idea Logical Company, Inc. Retrieved 19 November 2009. 
  34. ^ "New York Times' obituary for Harry Cross". The New York Times. April 4, 1946. p. 23. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 
  35. ^ "New York Times' obituary for William Hanna". The New York Times. November 27, 1930. p. 4. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 
  36. ^ "Frank Hough". baseballlibrary.com. The Idea Logical Company, Inc. Retrieved 21 November 2009. 
  37. ^ "Sid Mercer". baseballlibrary.com. The Idea Logical Company, Inc. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 
  38. ^ "Tim Murnane's Career Statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-11-12. 
  39. ^ "The Forgotten Honor Rolls of the National Baseball Hall of Fame". sabr.org. Society For American Baseball Research. 01-09-2006. Retrieved 2009-11-12. 
  40. ^ Shaw, Amber. "The Impact of Francis Richter upon the Development of Baseball". uga.edu. University of Georgia. Retrieved 21 November 2009. 
  41. ^ "Irving Sanborn". baseballlibrary.com. The Idea Logical Company, Inc. Retrieved 21 November 2009. 
  42. ^ Del Pratt at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Steve Steinberg, retrieved 2009-11-21
  43. ^ Young, Geisler. "Slocum Award". baseball-almanac.com. Hosting 4 Less. Retrieved 21 November 2009. 
  44. ^ Rohde, David (May 19, 1997). "Frank Slocum, 71, an Executive In Baseball and a Writer for TV". nytimes.com (The New York Times). Retrieved 21 November 2009. 
  45. ^ a b Lieb, p. 32