Hoosier Lottery

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The Hoosier Lottery is the only US lottery that uses the state's nickname as its official name. It is a member of the Multi-State Lottery Association (MUSL). Its games include Hoosier Lotto, Powerball, Mega Millions, Cash 5, Poker Lotto and numerous draw and scratch games.

History[edit]

In early American history, legislators commonly established lotteries to fund schools, roads, and other public works.[1] The government of the Indiana Territory in 1807 chartered Vincennes University, authorizing it to raise up to $20,000 in a lottery, to provide for a library and other facilities.[2] The lottery was a failure; after a year, those few tickets that had been sold were recalled.[3] Another lottery was authorized in 1810 to raise $1,000 to buy books for a library in Vincennes, but it was unsuccessful.[4] Another was authorized in 1818 for the Jeffersonville Ohio Canal Company to raise $100,000, but it only brought in $2,536.[5]

The 1840s and 1850s saw a general movement against lotteries in the United States, partly on moral grounds, and partly due to a backlash against legislative corruption.[6] The Indiana constitutional convention of 1851 adopted, with little debate, a clause that "no lottery shall be authorized; nor shall the sale of lottery tickets be allowed".[2]

Vincennes University moved to revive its lottery in 1879, arguing successfully in a test case before the Indiana Supreme Court that, under the Contracts Clause, the lottery provision of the 1807 charter could not be revoked, even by a constitutional ban.[7][8] The U.S. Supreme Court soon rejected a similar argument in Stone v. Mississippi,[9] but Vincennes was able to run its lottery as a policy game, contracted out to a group of experienced lottery operators from Kentucky,[10] for over a year before it was ruled unlawful in 1883.[2][11]

In 1988, state voters approved by 62 percent a constitutional amendment lifting the ban.[12][13] Indiana legislators authorized the state lottery, along with parimutuel betting on horse racing, in May 1989.[14][15] The first scratch-off game, Hoosier Millionaire, went on sale in October.[16] Lotto Cash, the first online game, began in April 1990.[17]

Lightning struck twice[edit]

On July 29, 1998, a group of 13 machine-shop workers from Ohio bought a Powerball ticket in Richmond, Indiana that won the then-largest U.S. lottery jackpot ($295.7 million annuity value.) The "baker's dozen" had chosen the cash option. Richmond produced a yet-larger Powerball prize of approximately $314 million in the August 25, 2007 drawing.

Record in-house jackpot[edit]

The drawing on November 7, 2007 had a jackpot of $54.5 million, its largest jackpot ever. Retired steel worker Peter Gilbert of East Chicago, Indiana chose the cash option of $40.4 million rather than the 30 annual payments [1]. There were no jackpot winners since October 21, 2006, so the grand prize broke its previous jackpot record of $42 million set June 5, 1999.

Draw Games[edit]

Daily 3[edit]

Daily 3 is a daily pick 3 game that began in 1990. Prices, prizes and types of play vary. Daily 3 is drawn 13 times weekly, with one drawing on Sundays.

Daily 4[edit]

Daily 4 also began in 1990. Prices, prizes and types of play vary. Daily 4 also is drawn 13 times weekly.

Lucky 5 (ending November 3, 2012)[edit]

Lucky 5 also is drawn 13 times weekly. Top prize is $50,000.

On November 4, 2012, L5 will be replaced by Cash 5, which will draw from 39 numbers instead of 36. Cash 5 will be drawn nightly; it will have a minimum jackpot of $50,000. Players will need only two matching numbers (instead of three) in the $1-per-play game.

Quick Draw[edit]

Quick Draw is daily; games cost $1 each. Players choose 10 numbers from 1-80. The Lottery draws 20 numbers. Matching any 10 of the 20 numbers wins $300,000. This game is very similar to Keno.

Mix & Match[edit]

Mix & Match is played Tuesday and Friday evenings. For each Mix & Match ticket, players receive three lines of five numbers each; one play costs $2. Five numbers from 1-50 are drawn. There are multiple ways of winning. Match the 5 numbers across a three line set to win up to $5,000. Match all five numbers on a single line to win $200,000.

Hoosier Lotto[edit]

Hoosier Lotto was the first Indiana lottery. It is played on Wednesday and Saturdays, and uses a 6/48 matrix. The jackpots begin at $1 million; after two drawings without a winner, the jackpot increases by $500,000 per draw. Games cost $1 each.

Powerball (multi-lottery game)[edit]

Since 1990, the Hoosier Lottery has been a MUSL member. Powerball began in 1992. Powerball's jackpots currently start at $40 million; it is drawn Wednesday and Saturday nights.

Mega Millions (multi-lottery game)[edit]

On October 13, 2009, the Mega Millions consortium and MUSL reached an agreement in principle to cross-sell Mega Millions and Powerball in U.S. lottery jurisdictions. On January 31, 2010, the Hoosier Lottery began selling Mega Millions tickets.

References[edit]

  1. ^ McMaster, John Bach (1911). A History of the People of the United States: From the Revolution to the Civil War. Appleton and Company. p. 588. 
  2. ^ a b c Howard, Timothy Edward (1907). A History of St. Joseph County, Indiana. Lewis Publishing Company. p. 98. 
  3. ^ Burnett, Howard R. (1933). "Early History of Vincennes University". Indiana Magazine of History 29 (2): 120. 
  4. ^ Constantine, J. Robert (1965). "The Vincennes Library Company: A Cultural Institution in Pioneer Indiana". Indiana Magazine of History 61 (4): 316, 352. 
  5. ^ Fatout, Paul (1961). "Canal Agitation at Ohio Falls". Indiana Magazine of History 57 (4): 303. 
  6. ^ Szymanski, Ann-Marie E. (2003). Pathways to Prohibition: Radicals, Moderates, and Social Movement Outcomes. Duke University Press. pp. 95–96. ISBN 978-0-8223-3169-8. 
  7. ^ Kellum v. The State, 66 Ind. 588 (Ind. 1879).
  8. ^ "Men and things in Indiana: A university starting a lottery". New York Times. February 5, 1882. 
  9. ^ Stone v. Mississippi, 101 U.S. 814 (U.S. 1880).
  10. ^ "Notes from Indiana: How a lottery scheme was legalized". New York Times. December 3, 1882. 
  11. ^ State v. Woodward, 89 Ind. 110 (Ind. 1883).
  12. ^ "Voters lift state curb on lottery". The Post-Tribune (Merrillville: via HighBeam). November 9, 1988.  (subscription required)
  13. ^ "Lottery opponents say they will continue fight". The Post-Tribune (Merrillville: via HighBeam). November 10, 1988.  (subscription required)
  14. ^ "Hoosier lottery is approved, along with pari-mutuel bets". Rochester Sentinel. AP. May 4, 1989. 
  15. ^ "They said...". The Post-Tribune (Merrillville: via HighBeam). May 13, 1989.  (subscription required)
  16. ^ "Lottery fever dies, but goal reachable". Bryan Times. UPI. October 16, 1989. 
  17. ^ Kusmer, Ken (April 30, 1990). "Lottery's 'cash game' begins". Madison Courier. AP. 

External links[edit]