Hopatcong, New Jersey

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Hopatcong, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hopatcong
Map of Hopatcong Borough in Sussex County.
Map of Hopatcong Borough in Sussex County.
Census Bureau map of Hopatcong, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hopatcong, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°57′09″N 74°39′35″W / 40.952432°N 74.65966°W / 40.952432; -74.65966Coordinates: 40°57′09″N 74°39′35″W / 40.952432°N 74.65966°W / 40.952432; -74.65966[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
Incorporated April 2, 1898 as Brooklyn
Renamed March 22, 1901 as Hopatcong
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Sylvia Petillo (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Robert Elia[4]
 • Clerk Catherine Gleason[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 12.248 sq mi (31.722 km2)
 • Land 10.854 sq mi (28.113 km2)
 • Water 1.394 sq mi (3.609 km2)  11.318%
Area rank 188th of 566 in state
16th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 997 ft (304 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 15,147
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 14,927
 • Rank 167th of 566 in state
3rd of 24 in county[12]
 • Density 1,395.5/sq mi (538.8/km2)
 • Density rank 347th of 566 in state
6th of 24 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07843[13][14]
Area code(s) 973[15]
FIPS code 3403732910[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885259[18][2]
Website www.hopatcong.org

Hopatcong is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 15,147,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 741 (-4.7%) from the 15,888 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 302 (+1.9%) from the 15,586 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The area had been called "Brookland" in the 19th century and the lake that was expanded to become Lake Hopatcong had been known as "Great Pond" or "Brookland Pond". During the 1830s, the name of the community had been modified to "Brooklyn", to match the spelling of the city on New York's Long Island.[20] Hopatcong was originally established as the Town of Brooklyn on April 2, 1898, from portions of Byram Township. On March 22, 1901, the Borough of Hopatcong replaced Brooklyn.[21] In 1922, residents of Byram Cove, Northwood, and other areas to the west of the original land area of the borough, voted to leave Byram Township and join Hopatcong, leaving the Borough with its current borders.[22]

Geography[edit]

Hopatcong is located at 40°57′09″N 74°39′35″W / 40.952432°N 74.65966°W / 40.952432; -74.65966 (40.952432,-74.65966). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 12.248 square miles (31.722 km2), of which 10.854 square miles (28.113 km2) was land and 1.394 square miles (3.609 km2) (11.38%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 75
1910 146 94.7%
1920 179 22.6%
1930 534 198.3%
1940 660 23.6%
1950 1,173 77.7%
1960 3,391 189.1%
1970 9,052 166.9%
1980 15,531 71.6%
1990 15,586 0.4%
2000 15,888 1.9%
2010 15,147 −4.7%
Est. 2012 14,927 [11] −1.5%
Population sources: 1800-1920[23]
1900-1910[24] 1910-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27][28] 2010[9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 15,147 people, 5,653 households, and 4,110 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,395.5 per square mile (538.8 /km2). There were 6,296 housing units at an average density of 580.0 per square mile (223.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.07% (13,794) White, 2.91% (441) Black or African American, 0.11% (16) Native American, 2.25% (341) Asian, 0.02% (3) Pacific Islander, 1.76% (266) from other races, and 1.89% (286) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.32% (1,714) of the population.[8]

There were 5,653 households, of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.0% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.3% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.13.[8]

In the borough, 22.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 32.0% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 101.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $85,730 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,570) and the median family income was $95,962 (+/- $5,996). Males had a median income of $60,533 (+/- $5,094) versus $47,515 (+/- $7,133) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,033 (+/- $2,406). About 1.6% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 15,888 people, 5,656 households, and 4,236 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,449.7 people per square mile (559.7/km2). There were 6,190 housing units at an average density of 564.8 per square mile (218.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.10% White, 1.95% African American, 0.11% Native American, 1.80% Asian, 1.42% from other races, and 1.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.99% of the population.[27][28]

There were 5,656 households out of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.1% were non-families. 18.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.24.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 34.8% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 6.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 102.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $65,799, and the median income for a family was $73,277. Males had a median income of $47,083 versus $34,238 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,698. About 2.2% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

History[edit]

Lake Hopatcong as seen from Hopatcong Borough.

The town of Hopatcong has a rich history, given its relationship with New York City. It borders Lake Hopatcong, a partially man-made lake that is now a source of much recreation and desirable real estate, and is the biggest lake in New Jersey. The community, 40 miles (64 km) west of New York City, began as a summer getaway for the wealthy in NYC who primarily sought access to the lake. An amusement park, called "Bertrand's Island", sprang up and was accessible via the lake, trolley or by car through Mount Arlington. The construction of Interstate 80, a highway that stretches from Teaneck, New Jersey, all the way across the country to San Francisco, California, triggered rapid growth in New York City's suburbs and led to Hopatcong's becoming a permanent residential community.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hopatcong is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

The Mayor is the chief executive officer of the Borough, helps set the agenda for Council meetings and chairs all meetings of the Council. The Mayor can vote only in the event of a tie but has the power to veto any ordinance adopted by the Council.

The Mayor has executive authority to act between Council meetings in matters affecting the Borough. The Mayor can declare a state of emergency and can act to protect the Borough and its citizens. The Mayor appoints the members of all Borough Committees and certain Borough Commissions. The Mayor's nominations for certain other Borough Boards and Commissions are subject to Council approval. The Mayor prepares the initial draft of the annual Borough budget for submission to the Council. The Mayor can issue Proclamations. The Mayor is authorized to perform marriage ceremonies. The Mayor is required to sit as a member of the Borough Planning Board. The signatures of the Mayor and Borough Clerk are necessary to create any legally binding obligation of the Borough.

The Borough Council enacts ordinances, which require public notice / hearings and have the effect of law; and resolutions, which state the policy or direction of the Council.

The Council adopts the annual Borough Budget and approves the Mayor's nominations of certain officials. Council members are annually appointed by the Mayor to act as liaisons to various Borough departments, Boards, Commissions or Committees. The Council annually elects a member to serve in the position of Council President. In the absence of the Mayor, the Council President can assume the role and duties of the Mayor. The Council also annually elects a member to serve as its representative on the Planning Board.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Hopatcong Borough is Sylvia Petillo (R, whose term ends December 31, 2015). Members of the Hopatcong Borough Council are Council President Howard Baker (R, 2013), Rich Bunce (R, 2015), Michael Francis (R, 2013), Marie Ryder Galate (R, 2012), Estelle R. Klein (R, 2014) and John Young (R, 2014).[30][31][32][33]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hopatcong is located in the 11th Congressional District[34] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[9][35][36] Prior to the 2010 Census, Hopatcong had been part of the 5th Congressional District; the change was made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission and took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[37]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[41][42]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[43][44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[47] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[48] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[49] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[50] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[51] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[52][47] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[53] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[54] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[55] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[56][53] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[57][58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 9,554 registered voters in Hopatcong, of whom 1,917 (20.1% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 3,242 (33.9% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 4,383 (45.9% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.[59] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 63.1% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 81.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[59][60]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 3,285 votes here (55.0% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,560 votes (42.9% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 117 votes (2.0% vs. 2.1%), among the 5,973 ballots cast by the borough's 9,652 registered voters, for a turnout of 61.9% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[61] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,941 votes here (54.7% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3,096 votes (43.0% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 117 votes (1.6% vs. 1.5%), among the 7,199 ballots cast by the borough's 9,571 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.2% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[62] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 4,003 votes here (59.4% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,616 votes (38.8% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 98 votes (1.5% vs. 1.3%), among the 6,739 ballots cast by the borough's 9,182 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.4% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[63]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 3,089 votes here (63.2% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,260 votes (25.8% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 441 votes (9.0% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 72 votes (1.5% vs. 1.3%), among the 4,888 ballots cast by the borough's 9,454 registered voters, yielding a 51.7% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[64]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for kindergarten through twelfth grade are served by the Hopatcong Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Hudson Maxim Elementary School[66] (267 students in KG-1), Tulsa Trail Elementary School[67] (300; 2-3), Durban Avenue Elementary School[68] (312; 4-5), Hopatcong Middle School[69] (519; 6-8) and Hopatcong High School[70] (714; 9-12).[71]

Events[edit]

Hopatcong holds annual APBA Boat Races that attract the local residents to a day at the lake. Hopatcong is also known for its yearly "Hopatcong Days" that offer a weekend of events that include a parade, and an array of festivities in Modick Park, sponsored by the local Business Association and including an annual Soap Box Derby and Car Show.[72]

The Hopatcong Museum holds a variety of local historical artifacts.[citation needed]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Hopatcong include:

  • Joe Cook (1890–1959), vaudeville actor who lived on the shores of Lake Hopatcong in a house he named "Sleepless Hollow".[73]
  • Lotta Crabtree (1847-1924), actress.[22][74]
  • Joe Martinek (born 1989), leading football rusher in New Jersey high school history.[75]
  • Hudson Maxim (1853–1927), inventor and chemist who is the namesake of the district's Hudson Maxim School.[76]
  • Dave Yovanovits (born 1981), former NFL offensive lineman.[77]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administrator, Borough of Hopatcong. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Hopatcong. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Hopatcong, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hopatcong borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hopatcong borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hopatcong, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 3, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hopatcong, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  20. ^ Balston, Mottel. A HISTORY OF LANDING, MORRIS COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, LandingNewJersey.com. Accessed May 19, 2008.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. pp. 231 (re Hopatcong) and 229 (re Brooklyn) Accessed October 26, 2012.
  22. ^ a b History, Borough of Hopatcong. Accessed October 3, 2011.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed January 23, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed October 3, 2011.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hopatcong borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hopatcong borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hopatcong borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  30. ^ Mayor / Council. Borough of Hopatcong. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  31. ^ County Election Summary - General election November 2, 2010, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 8, 2010. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  32. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  33. ^ County Summary With Detail - General Election: November 6, 2012, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  34. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  44. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ a b Sussex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  48. ^ Richard A. Vohden, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  49. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  50. ^ Phillip R. Crabb, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  51. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  54. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Clerk's Office. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ Sheriff's Office, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  56. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Surrogate. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  58. ^ Sussex County Official Directory 2014, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  59. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  60. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  61. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 26, 2013.
  62. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  63. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  64. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  65. ^ Data for Hopatcong Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  66. ^ Hudson Maxim Elementary School, Hopatcong Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  67. ^ Tulsa Trail Elementary School, Hopatcong Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  68. ^ Durban Avenue Elementary School, Hopatcong Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  69. ^ Hopatcong Middle School, Hopatcong Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  70. ^ Hopatcong High School, Hopatcong Public Schools. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  71. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Hopatcong Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  72. ^ Staff. "Hopatcong Days festivities begin", Daily Record (Morristown), July 12, 2002. Accessed February 21, 2013.
  73. ^ History, Borough of Hopatcong. Accessed February 1, 2011. "The center for much of this activity was Joe Cook's Sleepless Hollow in Hopatcong's Davis Cove. Cook was a popular Vaudevillian, comedian and musical theater star who lived at the Lake from 1924 to 1941."
  74. ^ Lawson, Anthony. "'Miss Lotta' makes impressive appearance on Lake Hopatcong", Aim Jefferson, September 6, 2013. Accessed October 15, 2013. "The former Southern Belle was re-christened Miss Lotta in honor of one of Lake Hopatcong's most famous summer residents, Lotta Crabtree, an entertainer from the 1800's. In 1885 Lotta's mother had an 18 room summer cottage built in the Breslin Park section of Mount Arlington. She gave it to Lotta and called it Attol Tryst (Lotta spelled backwards)."
  75. ^ Hofmann, Joe. "Off and running", Daily Record (Morristown), September 7, 2006. Accessed February 1, 2011. "Hopatcong's Joe Martinek and Pope John's Jeremy Tucker are both first-team All-State running back candidates who combined for 5,010 yards and 62 touchdowns last year."
  76. ^ Via Associated Press. "Hudson Maxim has passed on", Christian Science Monitor, May 7, 1927. Accessed February 1, 2011. "LAKE HOPATCONG, N.J. (AP)-- Hudson Maxim, inventor of explosives and author on a variety of subjects, has passed on at his home here."
  77. ^ Hoffman, Joe. "Former Hopatcong star Yovanovits used skill, work ethic to become an NFL draft pick", Daily Record (Morristown), May 3, 2003. Accessed October 3, 2011. "Dave Yovanovits was told to watch for his name to scroll across the bottom of the television screen during the second day of the NFL draft last Sunday. Temple was the only Division 1 school to offer him a scholarship after his senior season at Hopatcong."

External links[edit]