Hope Township, New Jersey

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Hope Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hope
Map of Hope Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hope Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hope Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hope Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°54′37″N 74°59′09″W / 40.91031°N 74.98577°W / 40.91031; -74.98577Coordinates: 40°54′37″N 74°59′09″W / 40.91031°N 74.98577°W / 40.91031; -74.98577[1][2]
Country United States
state New Jersey
County Warren
Incorporated April 8, 1839
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Timothy McDonough (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Mary Pat Quinn[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 18.837 sq mi (48.788 km2)
 • Land 18.621 sq mi (48.229 km2)
 • Water 0.216 sq mi (0.559 km2)  1.15%
Area rank 152nd of 566 in state
11th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 436 ft (133 m)
Population (2010)[7][8][9]
 • Total 1,952
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 1,921
 • Rank 488th of 566 in state
21st of 22 in county[11]
 • Density 104.8/sq mi (40.5/km2)
 • Density rank 541st of 566 in state
20th of 22 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07844[12][13]
Area code(s) 908 Exchange: 459[14]
FIPS code 3404133060[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882242[17]
Website www.hopetownship.com

Hope Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 1,952,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 61 (+3.2%) from the 1,891 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 172 (+10.0%) from the 1,719 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] The 2010 Census population marked the first decennial census in which the township's population exceeded the 1,903 recorded in the 1840 Census, the first recorded population after the township was formed.

Hope Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 8, 1839, from portions of Knowlton Township and Oxford Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. Liberty Township was created on March 25, 1926, from portions of the township.[19]

Hope CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 195[20]), Mount Hermon (141[21]) and Silver Lake (368[22]) are census-designated places (CDPs) and unincorporated areas located within the township.[23][24][25]

Geography[edit]

The township is located at 40°54′37″N 74°59′09″W / 40.91031°N 74.98577°W / 40.91031; -74.98577 (40.91031,-74.98577). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 18.837 square miles (48.788 km2), of which, 18.621 square miles (48.229 km2) of it is land and 0.216 square miles (0.559 km2) of it (1.15%) is water.[1][2] The township is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 1,903
1850 1,755 −7.8%
1860 1,789 1.9%
1870 1,542 −13.8%
1880 1,569 1.8%
1890 1,332 −15.1%
1900 1,144 −14.1%
1910 1,119 −2.2%
1920 948 −15.3%
1930 553 * −41.7%
1940 646 16.8%
1950 681 5.4%
1960 833 22.3%
1970 1,140 36.9%
1980 1,468 28.8%
1990 1,719 17.1%
2000 1,891 10.0%
2010 1,952 3.2%
Est. 2012 1,921 [10] −1.6%
Population sources:
1840-1920[26] 1840[27] 1850-1870[28]
1850[29] 1870[30] 1880-1890[31]
1890-1910[32] 1910-1930[33]
1930-1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,952 people, 741 households, and 558 families residing in the township. The population density was 104.8 per square mile (40.5 /km2). There were 809 housing units at an average density of 43.4 per square mile (16.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.21% (1,878) White, 1.18% (23) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.59% (31) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.41% (8) from other races, and 0.61% (12) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.10% (80) of the population.[7]

There were 741 households, of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 19.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.03.[7]

In the township, 22.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 20.1% from 25 to 44, 35.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.2 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.8 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $75,107 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,302) and the median family income was $81,204 (+/- $7,973). Males had a median income of $59,141 (+/- $10,502) versus $52,574 (+/- $25,011) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,283 (+/- $2,988). About 4.8% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.3% of those under age 18 and 0.8% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 1,891 people, 697 households, and 538 families residing in the township. The population density was 102.2 people per square mile (39.5/km²). There were 747 housing units at an average density of 40.4 per square mile (15.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 98.25% White, 0.42% African American, 0.42% Asian, 0.05% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.48% of the population.[35][36]

There were 697 households out of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.3% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.12.[35][36]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the township was $61,319, and the median income for a family was $68,750. Males had a median income of $48,750 versus $34,038 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,902. About 1.1% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.6% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

History[edit]

The Moravian Church in Hope, NJ is now the headquarters for the Bank of Hope.

Hope Township is one of the earliest planned communities in the United States, having been established by German Moravians in 1769. They knew what they wanted to achieve, which is shown on several early planning maps, which detail streets, homes, wells, businesses, farms, a school, tavern and church.[38]

Prior to the arrival of the Moravians, there was no distinct town, but several families farmed on Jenny Jump Mountain, to the south of Hope, in surrounding area and on John Samuel Green, Jr.’s farm in the center of what is now the Village. Throughout the 1760s, Moravians from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania traveled through this area on their way to New England to establish new communities. They lodged overnight with the Green Family who were impressed with their religion and way of life.

Old gristmill in Hope

The Moravians were a religious group whose formal name was the “Unitas Fratrum” or Unity of the Brethren. They were followers of Jan Hus, the reformer from Prague who protested against the Roman Catholic Church in 1415 and was finally burned at the stake for his rebellion. These followers continued to practice his views in Moravia and Bohemia in what is now the Czech Republic, hence the common name “The Moravians”. In the late 17th century this group began to be persecuted and sought shelter away from Bohemia. Count Nicolas Ludwig von Zinzendorf offered them refuge on his lands east of Dresden, Germany and provided a base for them to regroup and pursue their religion. That settlement which remains as the center of the worldwide Moravian religion is called Herrnhut or “The Lord's Watch" inhabitants were not only "under the Lord's watchful care" but were also to be "on watch for the Lord". With the support of Count von Zinzendorf, the Church established over 200 missionary settlements.

After a formal survey of the Village completed on November 26, 1774, the community was officially accepted by The Moravian Church and the name was changed by drawing lots on February 8, 1775, from Greenland to Hope.[38]

After almost 40 years of the Moravian “experiment” in Hope, the community was sold and almost all of the Moravians returned to Bethlehem or Nazareth, Pennsylvania. The basic reason for closing the community was that it was never self-supporting and had declined from its height of population of 147 to under 100 people by the early 19th century. The Church in Germany could no longer subsidize such a small village. Moravians worldwide were selling possessions and even some other entire communities to pay off debts incurred years earlier by Count von Zinzendorf, who heavily mortgaged his lands to give them opportunity back in Germany. Disease and a competitive gristmill also contributed to Moravian Hope's decline.[39]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hope Township is governed under the Township form of government with a three-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor, each serving in that role for one year.

As of 2013, the Hope Township Committee consists of Mayor Timothy C. McDonough (I, term on committee ends December 31, 2015; term as mayor ends December 31, 2013), Deputy Mayor George Beatty (R, 2014; term as deputy mayor ends 2013) and M. John Koonz (R, 2013).[4][40][41][42][43]

Constitutional Officers are Township Clerk Mary Pat Quinn, Chief Financial Officer Kathleen Reinalda, Tax Collector Stephen Lance and Tax Assessor Richard Motyka.[4]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hope Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][45][46] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Hope Township had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[47]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[48] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[49][50] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[51][52]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[53][54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are chosen at-large on a staggered basis in partisan elections with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2014, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015), Freeholder Deputy Director Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014) and Freeholder Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2016).[57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[58] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[59][60] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,317 registered voters in Hope Township, of which 248 (18.8% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 523 (39.7% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 545 (41.4% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[62] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 67.5% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 87.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[62][63]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 566 votes here (60.5% vs. 56.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 337 votes (36.0% vs. 40.8%) and other candidates with 20 votes (2.1% vs. 1.7%), among the 936 ballots cast by the township's 1,321 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.9% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[64][65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 628 votes here (62.7% vs. 55.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 339 votes (33.9% vs. 41.4%) and other candidates with 15 votes (1.5% vs. 1.6%), among the 1,001 ballots cast by the township's 1,380 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.5% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 641 votes here (64.6% vs. 61.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 324 votes (32.7% vs. 37.2%) and other candidates with 17 votes (1.7% vs. 1.3%), among the 992 ballots cast by the township's 1,279 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.6% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 467 votes here (68.2% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 142 votes (20.7% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 50 votes (7.3% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 14 votes (2.0% vs. 1.5%), among the 685 ballots cast by the township's 1,328 registered voters, yielding a 51.6% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[68]

Education[edit]

Bergen-Passaic Expressway (Interstate 80) east of Exit 12 in Hope Township

The Hope Township School District serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade.[69] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district and its one school had a total enrollment of 288 students and 16.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 18.00:1.[70]

Students in public school for grades nine through twelve from Harmony Township, Hope Township and White Township attend Belvidere High School in Belvidere as part of sending/receiving relationships with the Belvidere School District.[69][71]

Students from the township and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8)[72] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[73] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[74][69]

Transportation[edit]

Interstate 80 (the Bergen-Passaic Expressway) passes through the township, with access via Exit 12 to Hope-Blairstown Road (County Route 521). CR 519 also passes through Hope, and can be accessed by CR 521.

Points of interest[edit]

  • Land of Make Believe is an amusement park centered around "Safe and wholesome recreation", with entertaining rides and attractions that are enjoyed by people of all ages but not so extreme that it scares off younger children.[75]
The gate to the Moravian Cemetery in Hope, NJ appeared in the horror movie, Friday the 13th.
  • Hope Township was the filming location for two scenes in the horror movie Friday the 13th, with the Moravian Cemetery (see photo) and Hartung's General Store appearing in the film.[76][77]

Surrounding communities[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Directory of Officials, Hope Township. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hope, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hope township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hope township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hope, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hope, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 246. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  20. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Hope CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Mount Hermon CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Silver Lake - Warren CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  23. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  24. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  25. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, p. III-5, August 2012. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  27. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  28. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 272, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed June 5, 2013. "Hope contained in 1850, 1,755 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,789; and in 1870, 1,542. The Jenny Jump Mountains extend across this township."
  29. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  30. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  31. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 100. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  32. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  33. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  34. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  35. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hope township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  36. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hope township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  37. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hope township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  38. ^ a b Antonoff, Paul S. "The Moravian Village of Hope Is Marked as a Historic Site; A Planned Community", The New York Times, October 7, 1973. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  39. ^ History, Hope Township. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  41. ^ GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 2, 2010, WARREN COUNTY Official Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey Clerk, November 5, 2010. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  42. ^ WARREN COUNTY GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 8, 2011, WARREN COUNTY Official Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey Clerk, November 15, 2011. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  43. ^ General Election November 6, 2012, WARREN COUNTY Tally for WARREN COUNTY of NJ, Warren County, New Jersey, November 19, 2012. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  49. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  50. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  51. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  52. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  53. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  54. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  55. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  57. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  58. ^ County Clerk's Office, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  59. ^ Message from Surrogate, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  60. ^ Constitutional Officers, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  61. ^ 2013 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  62. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Warren, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  63. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  64. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  65. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  68. ^ 2009 Governor: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  69. ^ a b c Municipal Guide to Public School Districts, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  70. ^ District information for the Hope Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  71. ^ Belvidere High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 11, 2013. "Belvidere High School is a small Group I school of approximately 500 students, encompassing grades nine through twelve. Students arrive from the Belvidere K-12 district and three surrounding K-8 districts; Hope, Harmony and White."
  72. ^ Overview, Ridge and Valley Charter School. Accessed September 16, 2013. "Enrollment is open to any child in New Jersey, with preference for students from the districts of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick, Knowlton and North Warren Regional."
  73. ^ About Us, Warren County Technical School. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  74. ^ About, Warren County Special Services School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  75. ^ About Us, Land of Make Believe. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  76. ^ Friday the 13th filming locations, Accessed June 6, 2013.
  77. ^ Staff. "Friday the 13th comes home to Warren County", Warren Reporter, May 13, 2011. Accessed June 5, 2013. "The original Friday the 13th, released in 1980, was centered around Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco in Hardwick Township, and included scenes across northern Warren County, including downtown Blairstown, Hardwick and Hope."

External links[edit]