Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey

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See also: the Borough of Hopewell, New Jersey and Hopewell Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey.
Hopewell Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hopewell
The Delaware and Raritan Canal in Hopewell Township
The Delaware and Raritan Canal in Hopewell Township
Location of Hopewell Township in Mercer County. Inset: Location of Mercer County highlighted in the state of New Jersey
Location of Hopewell Township in Mercer County. Inset: Location of Mercer County highlighted in the state of New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°21′23″N 74°48′43″W / 40.356361°N 74.812002°W / 40.356361; -74.812002Coordinates: 40°21′23″N 74°48′43″W / 40.356361°N 74.812002°W / 40.356361; -74.812002[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Founded February 20, 1700
Royal charter March 1, 1755
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Vanessa Sandom (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Paul Pogorzelski[4]
 • clerk Laurie E. Gompf[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 58.911 sq mi (152.580 km2)
 • Land 58.031 sq mi (150.300 km2)
 • Water 0.880 sq mi (2.279 km2)  1.49%
Area rank 22nd of 566 in state
1st of 13 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 217 ft (66 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 17,304
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 17,290
 • Rank 147th of 566 in state
7th of 13 in county[12]
 • Density 298.2/sq mi (115.1/km2)
 • Density rank 479th of 566 in state
13th of 13 in county[12]
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08560 - Titusville[13][14]
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 730, 737, 18[15]
FIPS code 3402133180[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882129[18][2]
Website www.hopewelltwp.org

Hopewell Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 17,304,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,199 (+7.4%) from the 16,105 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,515 (+39.0%) from the 11,590 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The township dates back to February 20, 1700, when the area was still part of Burlington County. It was formerly the name for one of two portions of 800 acres (3.2 km2) of land purchased in 1714 by William Trent, and was formally set off to Hunterdon County, when that county was created on March 11, 1714. Trenton Township was formed out of this estate on June 3, 1719, later to become the City of Trenton. Hopewell Township was incorporated by Royal charter on March 1, 1755, and was re-incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of the state's initial group of 104 townships. Hopewell Township became part of Mercer County at its creation on February 22, 1838. Portions of the township were taken to form Marion Township (February 22, 1838, reverted to Hopewell Township on February 14, 1839), the Borough of Pennington (January 31, 1890) and Hopewell Borough (April 14, 1891), with additional portions of the township transferred to both Pennington and Hopewell Borough in 1915.[20]

Hopewell Township includes the location (now known as Titusville) along the east side of the Delaware River to which George Washington and the Continental Army crossed from Pennsylvania. Once in Hopewell Township, the army marched to Trenton on December 26, 1776. The Battle of Trenton followed. Today, Washington Crossing State Park commemorates this important milestone in American history.

Hopewell Township was also the location where, two months after being abducted from his home in neighboring East Amwell, the body of Charles Lindbergh, Jr was discovered on May 12, 1932. [21]

Geography[edit]

Hopewell Township is located at 40°21′23″N 74°48′43″W / 40.356361°N 74.812002°W / 40.356361; -74.812002 (40.356361,-74.812002). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 58.911 square miles (152.580 km2), of which, 58.031 square miles (150.300 km2) of it is land and 0.880 square miles (2.279 km2) of it (1.49%) is water.[2][1]

Titusville is an unincorporated community located within Hopewell Township.

Washington Crossing State Park is located in the western part of the township.

Some neighborhoods in the township include Hopewell Hunt, Brandon Farms and Elm Ridge.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,320
1810 2,565
1820 2,881 12.3%
1830 3,154 9.5%
1840 3,205 1.6%
1850 3,698 15.4%
1860 3,900 5.5%
1870 4,276 9.6%
1880 4,462 4.3%
1890 4,338 −2.8%
1900 3,360 * −22.5%
1910 3,171 * −5.6%
1920 3,249 2.5%
1930 3,907 20.3%
1940 3,738 −4.3%
1950 4,731 26.6%
1960 7,818 65.3%
1970 10,030 28.3%
1980 10,893 8.6%
1990 11,590 6.4%
2000 16,105 39.0%
2010 17,304 7.4%
Est. 2012 17,290 [11] −0.1%
Population sources:
1790-1920[22] 1840[23] 1850-1870[24]
1850[25] 1870[26] 1880-1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 17,304 people, 6,282 households, and 4,925 families residing in the township. The population density was 298.2 per square mile (115.1 /km2). There were 6,551 housing units at an average density of 112.9 per square mile (43.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 86.74% (15,010) White, 2.10% (364) Black or African American, 0.07% (12) Native American, 8.89% (1,539) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.52% (90) from other races, and 1.66% (288) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.31% (573) of the population.[8]

There were 6,282 households, of which 39.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.1% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.14.[8]

In the township, 26.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 19.8% from 25 to 44, 34.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.4 years. For every 100 females there were 96.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $132,813 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,634) and the median family income was $151,394 (+/- $9,062). Males had a median income of $106,431 (+/- $9,830) versus $66,285 (+/- $11,820) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $55,219 (+/- $3,466). About 0.6% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 16,105 people, 5,498 households, and 4,431 families residing in the township. The population density was 277.1 people per square mile (107.0/km²). There were 5,629 housing units at an average density of 96.9 per square mile (37.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 77.30% White, 15.83% African American, 0.12% Native American, 3.97% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.66% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.45% of the population.[31][32]

There were 5,498 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.6% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.4% were non-families. 16.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.11.[31][32]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 103.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.3 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the township was $93,640, and the median income for a family was $101,579. Males had a median income of $66,849 versus $47,701 for females. The per capita income for the township was $43,947. About 0.9% of families and 1.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hopewell Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with at least one seat coming up for election each year.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.[34]

As of 2014, the members of the Hopewell Township Committee are Mayor Vanessa Sandom D, 2013,[35] Deputy mayor Allen Cannon(D, 2013),[36] John Hart (R, 2016),[37] Harvey Lester (D, 2015),[38] and Todd Brant (R, 2016).[39][40][41]

In the November 5, 2013, general election, John Hart and Todd Brant were elected to the Township Committee.[42] In January 2014 the Committee unanimously appointed Vanessa Sandom as Mayor.

Hopewell Township is served by the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station & Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Mercer County, located in Trenton.[43]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hopewell Township is located in the 12th Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 15th state legislative district.[9][45][46]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[50][51]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 15th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Lawrence Township, Mercer County) and in the General Assembly by Reed Gusciora (D, Trenton) and Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[52][53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy.[56] As of 2013, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D; term ends December 31, 2013, Princeton).[57] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the board selects a Freeholder Chair and Vice-Chair from among its members.[58] Mercer County's freeholders are Freeholder Chair John Cimino (D; 2014, Hamilton Township)[59], Freeholder Vice Chair Andrew Koontz (D; 2013, Princeton),[60] Ann M. Cannon (D; 2015, East Windsor Township),[61] Anthony P. Carabelli (D; 2013, Trenton),[62] Pasqual "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (D; 2015, Lawrence Township),[63] Samuel T. Frisby (D; 2015; Trenton)[64] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (D; 2014, Ewing Township)[65][66] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello (D, 2015).[67] Sheriff John A. "Jack" Kemler (D, 2014)[68] and Surrogate Dianne Gerofsky (D, 2016).[69][41]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 12,218 registered voters in Hopewell Township, of which 3,949 (32.3%) were registered as Democrats, 3,088 (25.3%) were registered as Republicans and 5,178 (42.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[70]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 56.5% of the vote here (5,517 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 41.4% (4,042 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (133 votes), among the 9,765 ballots cast by the township's 12,615 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.4%.[71] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 51.3% of the vote here (4,974 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 46.2% (4,476 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (80 votes), among the 9,698 ballots cast by the township's 11,780 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 82.3.[72]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 48.9% of the vote here (3,503 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 42.9% (3,074 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.9% (497 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (36 votes), among the 7,158 ballots cast by the township's 12,441 registered voters, yielding a 57.5% turnout.[73]

Neighboring municipalities[edit]

Hopewell Township surrounds both Pennington and Hopewell Borough.

View south along NJ Route 29 in Hopewell Township

Transportation[edit]

Route 29 passes through the southwestern part of Hopewell alongside the Delaware and Raritan Canal. Route 31 is the main north-south road that goes through the township. Interstate 95 also passes through in the southern part with two interchanges: Exits 3 (Scotch Road) and 4 (Route 31). Interstate 295 is outside the municipality in neighboring Lawrence Township. A few major county roads that go through are County Route 518, County Route 546, County Route 569 and County Route 579.

View north along Interstate 95 from Route 31 in Hopewell Township. The interchange with the cancelled Somerset Freeway would have been located in the distance where the median between the northbound and southbound roadways widens and becomes wooded

Hopewell Township was supposed to be where the Somerset Freeway would have started in the south, ending in the north in either Piscataway or Franklin. This would have completed I-95 in New Jersey. But the cancellation of this project led to having the New Jersey Turnpike carry the interstate numbering instead. Originally, I-295 had extended into Hopewell and ended where the supposed Somerset Freeway interchange was to be built. Ultimately, the Somerset Freeway was canceled in 1982. I-295 was redesignated I-95 from the canceled interchange to the exit at U.S. Route 1 in 1993.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the township and Trenton on the 602, 606 and 608 routes.[74]

Education[edit]

Public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, a comprehensive regional public school district serving students from Hopewell Borough, Hopewell Township and Pennington Borough.[75] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[76]) include four elementary schools — Bear Tavern Elementary School[77] (grades PreK-5; 469 students), Hopewell Elementary School[78] (PreK-5; 470), Stony Brook Elementary School[79] (K-5; 448) and Toll Gate Grammar School[80] (K-5; 307) — Timberlane Middle School[81] with 970 students in grades 6-8 and Hopewell Valley Central High School[82] with an enrollment of 1,203 students in grades 9 - 12.[83][84]

The Hopewell Project[edit]

Hopewell is home to an experimental renewable energy project called The Hopewell Project, which uses solar power to generate hydrogen that is used to provide 100% of a home's heating, cooling and electrical needs. The Hopewell Solar-Hydrogen Residence was dedicated on October 20, 2006.[85]

Wineries[edit]

Media[edit]

  • Hopewell Valley News
  • Pennington Post
  • Town Topics
  • The Hopewell Sun

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Hopewell Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Hopewell Township. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Hopewell Township. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hopewell, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hopewell township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hopewell township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Titusville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 24, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Titusville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 162. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  21. ^ "Lindbergh Kidnapping Index". Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 11, 2013.
  23. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 11, 2013. Population of 3,213 is listed, in conflict with data in table.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 275, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 11, 2013. Hopewell contained in 1850, 3,698 inhabitants; in 1860, 3,900; and in 1870, 4,276."
  25. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 139. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 11, 2013.
  26. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed September 23, 2012. Source lists population of 3,750 for 1980, in conflict with the data shown for the 1890 Census.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hopewell township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hopewell township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hopewell township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  34. ^ Form of Municipal Government, Township of Hopewell. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  35. ^ Mayor Vanessa Sandom, Township of Hopewell. Accessed November 23, 2012.
  36. ^ Allken Cannon, Township of Hopewell. Accessed November 23, 2012.
  37. ^ James Burd, Township of Hopewell. Accessed november 23, 2012.
  38. ^ Lester.html Harvey Lester, Township of Hopewell. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  39. ^ Michael Markulec, Township of Hopewell. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  40. ^ Hopewell Township Committee, Township of Hopewell. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  41. ^ a b Elected Officials, p. 8. Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  42. ^ [1] - Mercer County Official election results
  43. ^ Cooperative Extension of Mercer County, Rutgers University. Accessed October 12, 2007.
  44. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  48. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  50. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  51. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  52. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 29, 2014.
  53. ^ District 15 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 29, 2014.
  54. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  55. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ Elected Officials, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ County Executive, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ John Cimino, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  60. ^ Andrew Koontz, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  61. ^ Ann M. Cannon, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  62. ^ Anthony P. Carabelli, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  64. ^ Samuel T. Frisby, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed August 1, 2011.
  65. ^ Lucylle R. S. Walter, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  66. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  67. ^ County Clerk, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  68. ^ Meet the Sheriff, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  69. ^ Meet Surrogate Diane Gerofsky, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  70. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Mercer, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  71. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  72. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  73. ^ 2009 Governor: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  74. ^ Mercer County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  75. ^ History, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed November 19, 2012. "The district, as it functions today, has been a regionalized operation since 1965 when voters of Hopewell Township, Hopewell Borough and Pennington Borough approved a plan to consolidate their schools."
  76. ^ Data for the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  77. ^ Bear Tavern Elementary School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  78. ^ Hopewell Elementary School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  79. ^ Stony Brook Elementary School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  80. ^ Toll Gate Grammar School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  81. ^ Timberlane Middle School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  82. ^ Hopewell Valey Central High School, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  83. ^ Hopewell Valley Schools, Hopewell Valley Regional School District. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  84. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Hopewell Valley Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  85. ^ Hurdle, Jon. "Solar power eliminates utility bills in U.S. home", Reuters, January 19, 2007. Accessed September 23, 2012.
  86. ^ Rasmussen, Dr. Mark. "Baptists We Should Know: John Gano", The Baptist Voice. Accessed February 2, 2011.
  87. ^ John Hart, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed June 17, 2007.
  88. ^ Staff. "HOLT CLAIMS WIN IN 12TH DISTRICT, BUT ZIMMER DECLINES TO CONCEDE PRELIMINARY RETURNS PUT THE U.S. HOUSE INCUMBENT AHEAD BY 581 VOTES - WITH ABOUT 400 BALLOTS TO GO.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 18, 2000. Accessed February 2, 2011. "U.S. Rep. Rush Holt, the physicist from Hopewell Township, declared victory yesterday in his hard-fought 12th District contest against Republican challenger Dick Zimmer."
  89. ^ Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society 7. New Jersey Historical Society. 1922. p. 278. Retrieved 2011-02-02. 

External links[edit]