Horace Geoffrey Quaritch Wales

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Horace Geoffrey "H.G." Quaritch Wales (1900 – 1981) was educated at Charterhouse School, and Queens' College, Cambridge. He immediately embarked on a career in Southeast Asia, from which he was never to be deflected. At the age of 23 he entered the service of the Siamese Government where he served from 1924 to 1928 as an adviser to the courts of King Rama VI and King Rama VII. The first-hand knowledge gained from this experience formed the basis of his pioneering study Siamese State Ceremonies (1931), which remains a work of unrivalled insight into the Brahmanical rituals and Buddhist accretions of Thai kingship. He followed this with another work based on his experiences of Thai court and state functions, Ancient Siamese Government and Administration (1934). [1]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Siamese State Ceremonies: their history and function First published in 1931. Republished with explanatory notes 1992. First edition digitized 2005.
  • Towards Angkor in the Footsteps of the Indian Invaders;;lwith a foreword by Sir Francis Younghusband... and with forty-two illustrations from photographs and several maps. 1937
  • Years of Blindness. 1943 ("memoir of his travels through Asia at the end of the British Empire and European Imperialism following World War I".--AbeBooks)
  • Making of Greater India: a study in South-East Asian culture change. 1951
  • Prehistory and Religion in South-east Asia. 1957
  • Angkor and Rome; a historical comparison. 1965
  • Ancient Siamese Government and Administration. 1965
  • Indianization of China and of South-east Asia. 1967
  • Dvāravatī: the earliest kingdom of Siam (6th to 11th century A.D.) 1969
  • Early Burma — Old Siam: a comparative commentary. 1973
  • Making of Greater India. 1974 ("This study deals with the process of acculturation of Indic cultural values in Southeast Asia. Gives consideration to the problem that, despite the successive Indic influence and other influences, the cultures of Java and Cambodia retained a distinctive character and were never just incongruous admixtures but are usually recognized as Indo-Javanese, Cham, or Khmer."--AbeBooks)
  • Malay Peninsula in Hindu Times. 1976
  • Universe Around Them: cosmology and cosmic renewal in Indianized South-east Asia. 1977
  • Divination in Thailand: the hopes and fears of a Southeast Asian people. 1983

Journal articles[edit]

Journal of the Siam Society [JSS]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Guy (1995). The Dorothy and Horace Quaritch Wales Bequest — A Note. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain & Ireland (Third Series), 5 , pp 91-92 doi:10.1017/S1356186300013511

External links[edit]