Horace Waller

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Horace Waller
VCHoraceWallerGrave.jpg
Born 23 September 1896
Batley Carr, West Riding of Yorkshire
Died 10 April 1917 (aged 20)
Heninel, France
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch Flag of the British Army.svg British Army
Rank Private
Unit The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
Battles/wars World War I
Awards Victoria Cross

Horace Waller VC (23 September 1896 – 10 April 1917) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for "gallantry in the face of the enemy" awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Waller was born to John Edward and Esther Waller, of Dewsbury, Yorkshire.[1]

As a 20 year-old private in the 10th Service Battalion, The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, British Army during the First World War, Waller was awarded a Victoria Cross for his valiant actions on 10 April 1917 south of Heninel, France. During the day, Waller continued for more than an hour to throw bombs and held off enemy attack. In the evening the enemy again counter-attacked and eventually killed Waller.

For most conspicuous bravery when with a bombing section forming a block in the enemy line. A very violent counter-attack was made by the enemy on this post, and although five of the garrison were killed, Pte. Waller continued for more than an hour to throw bombs, and finally repulsed the attack. In the evening the enemy again counter-attacked the post and all the garrison became casualties, except Pte. Waller, who, although wounded later, continued to throw bombs for another half an hour until he was killed. Throughout these attacks he showed the utmost valour, and it was due to his determination that the attacks on this important post were repulsed.

—The London Gazette," No. 30122, 8 June 1917[1]

He is buried at Cojeul British Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais, France.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Horace Waller, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Accessed 20 August 2008