Hoshang NE Dinshaw

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Hoshang NE Dinshaw was the eldest son of the Karachi landowner Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw, and grandson of the renowned philanthropist Seth Edulji Dinshaw. He played an important part in the economic development of Pakistan, including as the President of the Central Board of Directors of the National Bank of Pakistan.[1]

Economic positions held[edit]

Hoshang NE Dinshaw was the chairman of Pakistan's Public Investment Council, and of the Reorganisation Council. He was the President of the Central Board of Directors of the National Bank of Pakistan. He was also a Vice President of the Federation of the Chamber of Commerce in Karachi; a founder member of the Old Buyers' and Shippers Chamber of Commerce and of the Pakistan Industrial Finance Corporation (later the Industrial Development Bank of Pakistan); and a director of the Karachi Electrical Supply Company.[2] He was offered a knighthood but declined it.[3]

NED Engineering College and Hoshang Road[edit]

In 1924, in memory of their father, the heirs of Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw, who were Hoshang, Minocher, Dinshaw and Faredoon, made substantial donations to Prince of Wales Engineering College and it was renamed as Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw Engineering College or NED Engineering College Karachi.[4] Parsis are guaranteed 4 seats for admission each year at NED.

Hoshang Road in Karachi, is named after him. This is a busy road connecting the famous Clifton Bridge of Karachi and Abdullah Haroon Road with Dr. Ziauddin Ahmed Road.

Family[edit]

He had two sons, Jamshed Dinshaw and Nadir Dinshaw. The Dinshaw family remains particularly noted for their charitable donations, especially to non-Parsis.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John R. Hinnells, The Zoroastrian Diaspora, Oxford, (2005) pp.225-6
  2. ^ John R. Hinnells, The Zoroastrian Diaspora, Oxford, (2005) pp.225-6
  3. ^ John R. Hinnells, The Zoroastrian Diaspora, Oxford, (2005) pp.225-6
  4. ^ John R. Hinnells, The Zoroastrian Diaspora, Oxford, (2005) p.225
  5. ^ John R. Hinnells, Zoroastrians in Britain, Oxford, (1996) p.58