House of Egmond

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van Egmond
noble family
Coat of arms
Coat of Arms
Country Netherlands
Founded 13th century
Founder Wouter van Egmond
Dissolution 17th century
Ethnicity Dutch

The Egmond or Egmont family is named after the Dutch town of Egmond, province of Noord Holland, and played an important role in the Netherlands during the Middle Ages. The family is extinct.

History[edit]

They were one of the principal noble families of the County of Holland during the Middle Ages.[1] The family rose to power due to its hereditary position as Voogd (Advocate) of the powerful Egmond Abbey in North Holland. They built their residence in Egmond aan den Hoef and became the Lords of Egmond. Thanks to a number of judicious marriages they were able to add the strategically important Lordship of IJsselstein[2] and the semi-sovereign territory of the Lords of Arkel[3] to their domains.

The family achieved even greater prominence in the period of Burgundian and Habsburg rule over the Netherlands. In the late 15th century, the senior branch became the sovereign Dukes of Guelders, whilst the younger branch split into the Counts of Egmond (elevated to become Princes of Gavere in 1553) and the Counts of Buren and Leerdam.[4] The senior branches of the family died out in the 16th and 17th centuries, but illegitimate branches (such as that of the Bavarian Counts of Geldern-Egmond[5]) flourished well into the 20th century.

The execution of Lamoral, Count of Egmont in 1568 helped spark the Dutch Revolt that eventually led to the independence of the Netherlands, while Anna van Egmond-Buren, known as Anna van Buren[6] in the Netherlands, was the first wife of William the Silent, the leader of this national uprising. Ironically, in 1573 both the Egmond Abbey and the Egmond Castle were destroyed on order of William the SIlent.

Notable members of the family[edit]

For the earlier lords, see List of Lords and Counts of Egmont.

Coat of arms[edit]

Shield: Or, seven chevronels gules. The Egmond coat of arms is depicted in the medieval Gelre Armorial (folio 83v) [7]

Note[edit]

The Irish Perceval family, which erroneously claims descent from the house of Egmond, was admitted to the Irish peerage as Earls of Egmont in 1722.[8]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Aalbers, J., et al, "De Bloem der Natie, Adel en Patriciaat in de Noordelijke Nederlanden. Amsterdam, 1987; p. 54
  2. ^ Dek, Dr. W.A.E., Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond. The Hague, 1958; p.14
  3. ^ Dek, Dr. W.A.E., Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond. The Hague, 1958; p. 18
  4. ^ Dek, Dr. W.A.E., Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond. The Hague, 1958; pp. 21-33 and pp. 48-64. Coppens, Thera, "Buren, Egmond en Oranje; Over heren, graven en prinsen" Buren, 1989; pp.14-46
  5. ^ Dek, Dr. W.A.E., Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond. The Hague, 1958; pp.34-47
  6. ^ Dek, Dr. W.A.E., Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond. The Hague, 1958; p. 67. Coppens, Thera, "Buren, Egmond en Oranje; Over heren, graven en prinsen" Buren, 1989; pp.79-106
  7. ^ [1]|Gelre Armorial folio 83v.
  8. ^ Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York, 1990[page needed],[page needed]

References[edit]

  • Aalbers, J; et al (1987), De Bloem der Natie, Adel en Patriciaat in de Noordelijke Nederlanden, Amsterdam, p. 54 
  • Coppens, Thera (1989), Buren, Egmond en Oranje; Over heren, graven en prinsen, Buren, pp. 14–46, 79–106 
  • Dek, W.A.E. (1958), Genealogie der Heren en Graven van Egmond, The Hague, pp. 14, 18, 21–64, 67 
  • Kidd, Charles; Williamson, David, eds. (1990), Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage, New York 

External links[edit]