House of Laanui

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The House of Laʻanui (Hale O Laʻanui in the Hawaiian language) is a family of heirs to the throne of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi collateral to the House of Kamehameha. Both houses are branches of the House of Keōua Nui.

Kalokuokamaile[edit]

The eldest branch of the House of Keōua Nui is from descendants of chiefs of the Kona district of the island of Hawaiʻi, and from the island of Maui. The dynastic line was established by Kalokuokamaile who was the eldest half-brother of King Kamehameha I, who established the reigning House of Kamehameha. Kalokuokamaile was the son of High Chief Keōua Kalanikupuapaikalaninui and High Chiefess Kahikikala-o-kalani of Western Maui.[1]

Laʻanui-Kalokuokamaile[edit]

The male line of Kalokuokamaile went extinct when Kalokuokamaile did not produce a male heir. He was survived by his daughter Princess Kaohelelani, by his wife Kaloiokalani of Kahikinui and Honuaula descent. Kaohelelani married Nuhi, who was noble but not a ruling chief. Rather than being called the House of Nuhi, the House continued under the name of their son, Gideon Peleioholani Laʻanui. Gideon's male line came to end in 1944 after the death of Theresa Owana Laʻanui, the last female descendants.[citation needed]

Her descendants:

  • For daughters, Eva and Daisy,
    (Cartwright-Laanui-Kalokuokamaile)
  • For grandchildren, Elliot, Dwight, and Emily
    (Styne-Cartwright-Laanui-Kalokuokamaile)
  • For son, Robert, from whom descend many other branches.
    (Wilcox-Laanui-Kalokuokamaile)
  • For the most active branch of Robert's descendants under Noa and his mother, Owana
    (Wilcox-Laanui-Kalokuokamaile-DeGuair-Salazar)
  • For daughter, Virginia (Wilcox-Laanui-Kalokuokamaile).
    For Virginia’s descendants (Miller-Wilcox-Laanui-Kalokuokamaile)


Claims to the throne[edit]

The Laʻanui are the closest descendants of Princess Elizabeth Kekaaniau, who attended the Chiefs' Children's School. Each of the 15 royal children were declared eligible to succeed to the Hawaiian throne by King Kamehameha III with approval of the House of Nobles.[2]

Members of the Laʻanui family sometimes claimed the titles of prince and princess, as a matter of tradition and respect of their ancient native Hawaiians ancestry.[citation needed]

Members of the family[edit]

Faith Igutahnood Faith Newbig Ken Newbig Kristin Newbig Afian

References[edit]

External links[edit]