How Can I Unlove You

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"How Can I Unlove You"
Single by Lynn Anderson
from the album 'How Can I Unlove You'
B-side "Don't Say Things You Don't Mean"
Released August 1971
Format 45 rpm
Recorded 1971
Genre Countrypolitan
Length 2:49
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Joe South
Producer(s) Glenn Sutton
Lynn Anderson singles chronology
"You're My Man"
(1971)
"How Can I Unlove You"
(1971)
"Cry"
(1972)

"How Can Unlove You" is the name of a No. 1 country hit by country music singer Lynn Anderson, released in 1971.

"How Can I Unlove You", was released as a single in August 1971, shortly after her previous hit, "You're My Man", peaked at No. 1 on the country charts, where it spent three weeks at the top.[1] Anderson had recently enjoyed the biggest hit of her career, "(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden", in February 1971. "How Can I Unlove You" reached No. 63 on the Pop charts, the same position as her previous No. 1 country hit, "You're My Man".

"How Can I Unlove You" was written by Joe South, who had also written "(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden". The song was produced by Anderson's husband at the time, Glenn Sutton, who had also produced "(I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden".

A Bluegrass version of the song was recorded by Anderson for her Grammy-nominated 2004 album, The Bluegrass Sessions.

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 1
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 63
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks 30
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 1
Canadian RPM Top Singles 42
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks 14

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944-2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 27. 
Preceded by
"Easy Loving"
by Freddie Hart
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number-one single

October 16-October 30, 1971
Succeeded by
"Here Comes Honey Again"
by Sonny James
Preceded by
"You're Lookin' at Country"
by Loretta Lynn
RPM Country Tracks
number-one single

November 6, 1971
Succeeded by
"Rollin' in My Sweet Baby's Arms"
by Buck Owens