Howard High School of Technology

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Howard High School
Howard HS Wilmington.JPG
Entrance
Howard High School of Technology is located in Delaware
Howard High School of Technology
Location 13th and Poplar Streets, Wilmington, Delaware
Coordinates 39°44′47.6″N 75°32′29.6″W / 39.746556°N 75.541556°W / 39.746556; -75.541556Coordinates: 39°44′47.6″N 75°32′29.6″W / 39.746556°N 75.541556°W / 39.746556; -75.541556
Built 1867
Architect James Oscar Batelle
Architectural style No Style Listed
Governing body Local
NRHP Reference # 85000309
Significant dates
Added to NRHP February 21, 1985[1]
Designated NHL April 4, 2005[2]
Howard High School of Technology
Established 1928 (incorporated into the New Castle County Vocational-Technical School District in 1978)
Type Vocational-Technical Secondary
Students 871
Grades 09–12
Location Wilmington, Delaware, USA
District New Castle County Vocational-Technical School District
Campus Urban
Colors Blue and White
Mascot Wildcats
Athletics Blue Hen Conference, Flight "B"
Website http://www.nccvotech.com/

Howard High School of Technology is a vocational-technical high school in Wilmington, Delaware and is the oldest of four high schools within the New Castle County Vocational-Technical School District, which includes Delcastle Technical High School in Newport, Hodgson Vo-Tech High School in Glasgow, and St. Georges Technical High School in St. Georges.

History[edit]

Formerly "Howard High School" and then "Howard Career Center," the school is a culturally significant institution in Wilmington, Delaware. Before becoming a vo-tech school, it was an all-black school, subject of Gebhart v. Belton, a 1953 desegregation court case. Parents of students bussed to Howard sued to allow admittance to all-white Claymont High School. Upon appeal to the U.S. Supreme court, it combined with four other cases, and thus was one of five schools subject of the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education U.S. supreme court case. The Howard case was the only one that had resulted in an order of desegregation at the state level. The Supreme Court ruling overturned "separate but equal" doctrine and ordered desegregation in all of the cases. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2005.,[2][3] It is located in the East Brandywine Historic District.

Howard High School was named after Oliver Otis Howard (November 8, 1830 – October 26, 1909) a career United States Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. He was a corps commander noted for suffering two humiliating defeats, at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, but he recovered from the setbacks while posted in the Western Theater, and served there successfully as a corps and army commander.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. 
  2. ^ a b "Howard High School". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2007-10-02. 
  3. ^ Flavia W. Rutkosky and Robin Bodo (January 5, 2004). "National Historic Landmark Nomination: Howard High School" (pdf). National Park Service.  and Accompanying seven photos

External links[edit]

School District[edit]