Howard Sturgis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Howard Overing Sturgis)
Jump to: navigation, search
Howard Sturgis
Born (1855-01-30)January 30, 1855
London, England
Died February 7, 1920(1920-02-07) (aged 65)
Windsor, Berkshire, England, Britain
Occupation novelist
Nationality British

Howard Overing Sturgis (January 30, 1855 – February 7, 1920) was an English-language novelist who wrote about same-sex love. Of American parentage, he lived and worked in Britain.

Biography[edit]

Howard Overing Sturgis was born in Britain on 30 January 1855, in London. He was born into an affluent New England American family - his father, Russell Sturgis, being the head of Baring's Bank. He had a brother, Julian, who also became a novelist. His parents sent him to be educated at Eton College. He went on to study at the University of Cambridge.

He became a friend of the novelists Henry James and Edith Wharton.[1]

After the death of his mother in 1888 he moved with his lover, William Haynes-Smith, into a country house named Queen's Acre, near Windsor Great Park.[1]

Sturgis's first novel, Tim: A Story of School Life (1891), was published anonymously and was dedicated to the "love that surpasses the love of women." It describes the love of two youths at boarding-school. It was followed in 1895 by All that was possible, an epistolary novel about a retired actress. Sturgis's first two novels were successful as far as sales were concerned; but his third, Belchamber (1904), failed to gain the same plaudits.[1] Although Edith Wharton praised it, Henry James found it unsatisfactory,[2] and afterwards Sturgis went on to publish only one short story (1908), about a lesser writer driven suicidal by the criticism of a greater, and a memorial on his friend, Anne Thackeray.

He died on 7 February 1920.[2] After his death appreciations of him were published by A. C. Benson (1924), Edith Wharton (1934), E. M. Forster (1936) and George Santayana (1944), his cousin.

Works[edit]

  • [Anonymously published], Tim: A Story of School Life (1891)
  • All That Was Possible (1895)
  • Belchamber (1904)
  • 'On the Pottlecombe Cornice', in Fortnightly Review (1908) [short story]

Further reading[edit]

  • Alan Hollinghurst, 'Don't ask Henry' [review of 2008 reissue of Belchamber], in London Review of Books; 30:19 (2008 October 9)
  • M. Seymour, A Ring of Conspirators: Henry James and his literary circle (1986)
  • E. Borklund, 'Howard Sturgis, Henry James and Belchamber ', in Modern Philology; 58 (1961), p. 255-269
  • George Santayana, Persons and Places (1944; repr. 1986)
  • E. M. Forster, 'Howard Overing Sturgis', in Abinger Harvest (1936), p. 121-129
  • Edith Wharton, A Backward Glance (1934; repr. 1985)
  • A. C. Benson, Memories and friends (1924)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c New York Review of Books
  2. ^ a b Borklund, Elmer. "Howard Sturgis, Henry James, and Belchamber". Modern Philology, Vol. 58, No. 4 (May, 1961)

External links[edit]