Howard Sachar

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Howard Morley Sachar (born February 10, 1928) is an American historian. He is Professor Emeritus of History and International Affairs at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and the author of 16 books,[1] as well as numerous articles in scholarly journals, on the subjects of Middle Eastern and Modern European history. His writings, which have been published in six languages,[2] are widely regarded as solid reference works.[3][4][5][6]

Biography[edit]

He was born to Dr. Abram L. Sachar and his wife, Thelma Horwitz,[7] during his father's tenure as a professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.[1][8] He was born in St. Louis, Missouri and raised in Champaign, Illinois. He was the eldest of three brothers; his brother Edward J. Sachar became a pioneering biological psychiatrist and David B. Sachar became a gastroenterologist.

He completed his undergraduate education at Swarthmore College and earned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Harvard University.[2]

Career[edit]

Sachar was a full-time faculty member of the Department of History and the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University for 40 years.[1] He was also a visiting professor at Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University, and a guest lecturer at nearly 150 other universities in North America, Europe, South Africa and Egypt.[2] In 1996 he was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. He has also received the National Jewish Book Award on two separate occasions.[2]

In 1961 he founded Brandeis University's Jacob Hiatt Institute in Jerusalem,[2] one of the first study-abroad programs in Israel,[1] and served as its director until 1964.[2] Through his connections with the United States Foreign Service, where he worked as a consultant and lecturer on Middle Eastern Affairs,[2] he was able to obtain funding for the Jacob Hiatt Institute from the U.S. State Department in 1965.[1]

He is a member of the American Historical Association as well as one dozen editorial boards and commissions. In addition to his books, he is editor-in-chief of the 39-volume The Rise of Israel: A documentary history.[2]

Political position[edit]

He is a member of the advisory council of the controversial lobbying organization J Street.[9]

He is an advocate of the two-state solution for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.[citation needed]

Works[edit]

  • The Course of Modern Jewish History (1959; updated 1990)[10] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 58-67-57
  • Aliyah: The peoples of Israel (1961)[11] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 61-12017
  • From the Ends of the Earth: The peoples of Israel (1964)[12] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 64-12064
  • The Emergence of the Middle East: 1914–1924 (1969) [13] Lib. of Cong. Cat. No. 76-79349
  • Europe Leaves the Middle East, 1936–1954 (1972)[14]
  • A History of Israel: From the rise of Zionism to our time (1976; 3rd edition 2007)[15]
  • The Man on the Camel: A novel (1980)[16]
  • Egypt and Israel (1981)[17]
  • Diaspora: An inquiry into the contemporary Jewish world (1985)[18]
  • A History of Israel, Volume II: From the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War (1987)[19]
  • The Rise of Israel: A documentary record from the nineteenth century to 1948 : a facsimile series reproducing over 1,900 documents in 39 volumes, Volume 1 (1987)[20]
  • A History of the Jews in America (1992)[21]
  • Farewell Espana: The world of the Sephardim remembered (1994; reprinted 1995)[22]
  • Israel and Europe: An Appraisal in History (1998; reprinted 2000)[23]
  • Dreamland: Europeans and Jews in the aftermath of the Great War (2002; reprinted 2003)[24]
  • A History of the Jews in the Modern World (2005; reprinted 2006)[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Fuchs, Sam (11 September 2009). "All in the Family: Dr. Howard Sachar and the Jacob Hiatt Institute". Brandeis University. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Emeritus Faculty: Howard M. Sacher". George Washington University. 17 June 2004. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  3. ^ Benn, Aluf (11 December 2009). "What To Read On Israeli Politics". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  4. ^ Kaufmann, David (16 December 2005). "Narrative History in the Grand Tradition". The Jewish Daily Forward. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  5. ^ Zipperstein, Steven J. (4 September 2005). "'A History of the Jews in the Modern World': The Best of Times?". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  6. ^ Brown, L. Carl (1984). International Politics and the Middle East: Old rules, dangerous game. Princeton University Press. p. 290. ISBN 1-85043-000-4. 
  7. ^ Lyons, Richard D. (25 July 1993). "Dr. Abram L. Sachar, Historian And 1st Brandeis U. President, 94". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  8. ^ Kirsch, Jonathan (28 December 1994). "BOOK REVIEW / HISTORY: A Poignant Celebration of a Rich Vein of Jewish History: FAREWELL ESPANA: The World of the Sephardim Remembered by Howard M. Sachar, Knopf, $30, 439 pages". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  9. ^ "Advisory Council". J Street. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  10. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1990). The Course of Modern Jewish History. Vintage Books. pp. 891 pages. ISBN 0-679-72746-9. 
  11. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1961). Aliyah: The peoples of Israel. World Publishing Co. p. 475. 
  12. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1964). From the Ends of the Earth: The peoples of Israel. p. 510. 
  13. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1969). The Emergence of the Middle East: 1914–1924. Knopf. p. 518. 
  14. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1972). Europe Leaves the Middle East, 1936–1954. Knopf. p. 687. ISBN 0-394-46064-2. 
  15. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2007). A History of Israel: From the rise of Zionism to our time. Knopf. p. 1270. ISBN 0-375-71132-5. 
  16. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1980). The Man on the Camel: A novel. Times Books. p. 308. ISBN 0-8129-0909-7. 
  17. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1981). Egypt and Israel. R. Marek. p. 384. ISBN 0-399-90124-8. 
  18. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1985). Diaspora: An inquiry into the contemporary Jewish world. Harper & Row. p. 539. ISBN 0-06-015403-9. 
  19. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1987). A History of Israel, Volume II: From the aftermath of the Yom Kippur War. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-504386-3. 
  20. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley; Cohen, Michael Joseph; Friedman, Isaiah; Klieman, Aaron S. (1987). The Rise of Israel: A documentary record from the nineteenth century to 1948 : a facsimile series reproducing over 1,900 documents in 39 volumes, Volume 1. Garland Pub. ISBN 978-0-8240-4926-3. 
  21. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1992). A History of the Jews in America. Knopf. p. 1051. ISBN 0-394-57353-6. 
  22. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (1995). Farewell Espana: The world of the Sephardim remembered. Vintage Books. p. 464. ISBN 0-679-73846-0. 
  23. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2000). Israel and Europe: An appraisal in history. Vintage Books. p. 416. ISBN 0-679-77613-3. 
  24. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2003). Dreamland: Europeans and Jews in the aftermath of the Great War. Vintage Books. p. 400. ISBN 0-375-70829-4. 
  25. ^ Sachar, Howard Morley (2006). A History of the Jews in the Modern World. Vintage Books. p. 848. ISBN 1-4000-3097-8.