Howard University School of Law

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Howard University School of Law
Howard University
Motto Veritas et Utilitas
Established 1869
School type Private[1]
Dean Okianer Christian Dark
Location Washington, D.C., USA
Enrollment 451[2]
Faculty 65[3]
USNWR ranking Tier 3[4]
Bar pass rate 71%[5]
Website www.law.howard.edu
ABA profile Howard University School of Law Profile

Howard University School of Law (also known as Howard Law or HUSL) is one of the professional graduate schools of Howard University. Located in Washington, D.C., it is one of the oldest law schools in the country and the oldest historically black college or university law school in the United States.[6] Today, Howard University School of Law confers an average of 185 Juris Doctorate and Master of Law degrees annually to students from the United States and countries in South America, the Caribbean, Africa, and Asia.[7] Howard University School of Law is fully approved by the American Bar Association, and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools.[8]

History[edit]

The legal department at Howard University opened on January 6, 1869.[9] The founders of Howard Law recognized “a great need to train lawyers who would have a strong commitment to helping black Americans secure and protect their newly established rights” during the country’s tumultuous Reconstruction era.[10] The year the legal department was opened, the school declared a nondiscriminatory admissions policy.[11] It was the first school to declare such a policy and Howard admitted white male and female students along with black students from its opening. In the 20th century, it became not only a school, but also the embodiment of legal activism. It emerged as a "clinic" on justice and injustice in America, as well as a clearinghouse for information on the civil rights struggle.[7]

Classes and first graduates[edit]

The first class consisted of six students, all black men, who met three evenings a week in the homes and offices of the four teachers.[12] Classes were held in various locations throughout the years before the law school settled into its current location at 2900 Van Ness Street, N.W., in 1974.[13] At the time, the LL.B program required only two years of study. Ten students were awarded degrees at the first commencement ceremony, which was held on February 3, 1871.[14]

Howard Law Today[edit]

Howard School of Law was accredited by the American Bar Association in 1931. Today, the school annually confers approximately 185 Jurist Doctorate and Master of Law degrees. The faculty consists of around fifty professors.[15]

Women in the History of Howard Law[edit]

Howard Law was the first school in the nation to have a nondiscriminatory admissions policy.[16] The school admitted white male and female students along with black students from its opening. It was a progressive policy at the time to admit women, but despite this, only eight women graduated from Howard Law during the entire first thirty years of its existence.[17] The nation’s first black woman lawyer, Charlotte E. Ray, was a graduate of Howard’s law program. Despite Howard University’s policy of nondiscrimination, it is reported that Charlotte applied to the law program using her initials as a ruse to disguise her gender because she was “[a]ware of the school’s reluctant commitment to the principle of sexual equality.”[18] Ray was admitted in 1869 and graduated in 1872.

Another woman claimed to have been admitted to Howard’s law program prior to Ray. Mary Ann Shadd Carey claimed to have been admitted in 1869, but was barred from graduating on time because of her gender. Carey graduated in 1883, making her the second black woman to do so.[19]

Eliza A. Chambers was an early white female graduate of Howard’s law program. Chambers was admitted in 1885 and successfully completed the three year course of study. However, “the Law School faculty refused to hand in [Eliza’s] name to the examiners, for admission to practice, omitting her from the list of her male classmates whom they recommended, simply because she was a woman.”[20]

Objectives[edit]

The objective of the School of Law is to produce superior professionals, capable of achieving positions of leadership in law, business, government, education, and public service. Most importantly, Howard University School of Law is dedicated to producing social engineers.[7]

Degrees Offered[edit]

Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Howard University School of Law offers the Juris Doctor (J.D.), and the Master of Laws (L.L.M). Additionally, students can enroll in the J.D./M.B.A. dual degree program with the Howard University School of Business.[21]

Campus[edit]

The campus is located in the upper Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., in the Forest Hills area of the city. The law school is located on its own 22-acre (89,000 m2) campus approximately five miles from the main campus.[22]

The campus was built by Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross, which occupied it until the school closed in 1973.

Publications[edit]

These include: [23]

Journals

  • Howard Law Journal (since 1955)[24]
  • The Jurist
  • Human Rights & Globalization Law Review[25]
  • The Barrister

History

  • A Legacy of Defending the Constitution: A Pictorial History Book of Howard University School of Law (1869-2009)[26]

Notable alumni[edit]

Howard University School of Law is one of the oldest law programs in the country. Established in 1869, the school has produced national leaders in politics, business, and in the legal profession. Among its distinguished graduates are Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall; former Virginia Governor Douglas Wilder; and Lazard Freres Senior Managing Director Vernon E. Jordan.

Notable Events[edit]

1986 World Food Day Food and Law Conference: The Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem

In 1986, Howard University School of Law and the Department of International Affairs, headed by Ambassador Walter Carrington and in cooperation with the office of satellite communications, held the 1986 World Food Day Food and Law Conference: The Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem. [27] J. Clay Smith, Jr. was acting Dean of the law school during this time. [28] The purpose of the conference was to “shed light on the paths to be followed by concerned people to bring to fruition the realization of the right of people to be free from hunger and to have an adequate diet.”[29] The goal of the conference was to gain an understanding of what needs to be done in order to solve the issue of global hunger: “Our conference is a call to act, to structure our system, our laws and our policies to meet this challenge head-on.”[30]Professor Goler Teal Butcher conceived, designed, and brilliantly participated in … the Symposium.[31] Butcher gathered experts, field participants, and scholars from around the world to serve as panelists for the event. [32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Howard University School of Law,” Entrepreneur.com (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  2. ^ Best Graduate Schools: Howard University School of Law,” U.S. News & World Report. (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/items/03033
  5. ^ http://www.vault.com/wps/portal/usa/!ut/p/c5/04_SB8K8xLLM9MSSzPy8xBz9CP0os3gzQ0u_YHMPIwP_gABTA09npxDXgKAAY1NzU6B8JLJ8oLGLgadBsJ-vsZmpj7GPIQHd4SD7cKoI8DJGl8c0HyRvgAM4Guj7eeTnpuoX5EYYZAakKwIAUnN8Yw!!/dl3/d3/L2dJQSEvUUt3QS9ZQnZ3LzZfNjE5TlM3SDIwT1BQNTBJQ0JURVBSUDNMMDc!/?programid=1603&programtype=2954
  6. ^ United States Cong. House. Recognizing and honoring Howard University School of Law's 140-year legacy of social justice. Carolyn C. Kilpatrick, 111 Cong., 1 sess. HR Res. 684. (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  7. ^ a b c History,” Howard University School of Law. Howard University. 2006. (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  8. ^ ABA-Approved Law Schools by Year,” Section of Legal Education & Admissions to the Bar. American Bar Association. (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  9. ^ Harriet Jackson Scarupa, The Howard School of Law. 125 Years of Changing Lives. . .And the Nation. Nat’l B.A. Mag., Nov./Dec., 1994, at 9.
  10. ^ History of Howard School of Law, http://www.law.howard.edu/19 (last visited April 17, 2013)
  11. ^ J. Clay Smith, Jr., Emancipation: The Making of the Black Lawyer 1844–1944, 54 (1993).
  12. ^ Harriet Jackson Scarupa, The Howard School of Law. 125 Years of Changing Lives. . .And the Nation. Nat’l B.A. Mag., Nov./Dec., 1994, at 9.
  13. ^ History of Howard School of Law, http://www.law.howard.edu/19 (last visited April 17, 2013).
  14. ^ History of Howard School of Law, http://www.law.howard.edu/19 (last visited April 17, 2013).
  15. ^ History of Howard School of Law, http://www.law.howard.edu/19 (last visited April 17, 2013).
  16. ^ J. Clay Smith, Jr., Emancipation: The Making of the Black Lawyer 1844–1944, 54 (1993).
  17. ^ Virginia G. Drachman, Sisters in Law: Women Lawyers in Modern American History, 45 (1998).
  18. ^ Virginia G. Drachman, Sisters in Law: Women Lawyers in Modern American History, 45 (1998).
  19. ^ Lelia J. Robinson, Women Lawyers in the United States, II The Green Bag 28 (Horace W. Fuller, ed.) (1890).
  20. ^ Lelia J. Robinson, Women Lawyers in the United States, II The Green Bag 28 (Horace W. Fuller, ed.) (1890).
  21. ^ Academic Programs and Institutes,” Howard University School of Law. Howard University, 2006. (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  22. ^ Our Campus,” Howard University School of Law. Howard University, 2006. (Retrieved 2009-10-27.)
  23. ^ "Publications". Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  24. ^ "Howard Law Journal". Howard Law. Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  25. ^ http://www.law.howard.edu/hrg
  26. ^ "A Legacy of Defending the Constitution A Pictorial History Book of Howard University School of Law". Howard Law. Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  27. ^ Walter Carrington, Symposium: World Food Day Food and Law Conference: the Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem: Opening and Keynote., 30 How. L.J. 205, 206 (1987).
  28. ^ Walter Carrington, Symposium: World Food Day Food and Law Conference: the Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem: Opening and Keynote., 30 How. L.J. 205, 206 (1987).
  29. ^ Walter Carrington, Symposium: World Food Day Food and Law Conference: the Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem: Opening and Keynote., 30 How. L.J. 205, 206 (1987).
  30. ^ Walter Carrington, Symposium: World Food Day Food and Law Conference: the Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem: Opening and Keynote., 30 How. L.J. 205, 206 (1987).
  31. ^ Henry J. Richardson, III. Tribute: African Americans and International Law: For Professor Goler Teal Butcher, with Appreciation, 37 How. L.J. 217, 222 (1994), citing World Food Day Food and Law Conference: The Legal Faces of the Hunger Problem, 30 How. L.J. 193 (1987).
  32. ^ Henry J. Richardson, III. Tribute: African Americans and International Law: For Professor Goler Teal Butcher, with Appreciation, 37 How. L.J. 217, 222 (1994).

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°56′37″N 77°03′30″W / 38.9437°N 77.0584°W / 38.9437; -77.0584