Hpakant

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Hpakant
ဖားကန့်
Hpakant is located in Burma
Hpakant
Hpakant
Location in Burma
Coordinates: 25°37′0″N 96°19′0″E / 25.61667°N 96.31667°E / 25.61667; 96.31667Coordinates: 25°37′0″N 96°19′0″E / 25.61667°N 96.31667°E / 25.61667; 96.31667
Country  Burma
Division Kachin State
District Myitkyina District
Township Hpakant Township
Population (2005)
 • Religions Buddhism, Christianity
Time zone MST (UTC+6.30)

Hpakant (Burmese: ဖားကန့်; also Hpakan and Farkent), is a town in Hpakant Township, Kachin State of the northernmost part of the Union of Myanmar. It is located on the Uyu River 350 km north of Mandalay in the middle of one of the world's most inhospitable and malaria infested jungles, cut off for several months a year during the monsoons. It is famous for its jade mines which produce the world's best quality jadeite.[1][2]

In 2011 fighting broke out between the Kachin Independence Army and the Burmese Army in the area around the Hpakant jade mines displacing an estimated 90,000 people by September, 2012 and killing hundreds of people.[3]

Transport[edit]

Located 48 miles from Mogaung, Hpakant.

Political economy[edit]

Like an old mining town of the American West, Hpakant has been dubbed "the wild wild east" replete with alcohol, gambling, prostitution, and opium dens. Since after the Kachin Independence Army (KIA) came into the area before negotiating a cease-fire agreement with Burma's military government in the early 1990s, heroin is no longer openly on sale on the streets of Hpakant. Both addicts and drug dealers were rounded up, taken to the nearby Uru River, shot and dumped in the river.[2]

Concerns have been expressed regarding the encroachment on and destruction of the environment from deforestation and landslides resulting from mining activities and consequent flooding. The Uru River has also been affected by the dumping of soil. There have been instances of locals being forced to leave their homes when upland areas were bulldozed by the big mining companies.[4]

The KIA however lost control of the jade mines once the cease-fire had been arranged, and firms from China, Hong Kong and Singapore started to operate in the area after winning concessions from the government.[5] More recently however the mining contracts went to the well known Burmese tycoon Tay Za's Htoo Group and also to Myanmar Dagaung Co Ltd, a subsidiary of the Hong Pang Group headed by Wei Hsueh-kang, a former drug trafficker and leader of the Wa insurgent group UWSA turned entrepreneur after the cease-fire deal.[6]

Maran Brang Seng, former chairman of the Kachin Independence Organisation (KIO) from 1976 until he died in 1994, was born in Hpakant in 1930.[7]

Mining hazards[edit]

One thousand miners apparently drowned in 2000 when flood waters of the Uru River rushed into the underground mines, but the news was hushed up by the authorities according to the locals. An explosion at Hpakant Gyi mine on New Year's Eve 2008 killed 2 miners and injured 7. It is owned by another one of the ethnic cease-fire groups, the Pa-O National Army (PNA) headed by Aung Kham Hti.[8]

More than 30 (and up to 70) people are believed to have been killed in a massive landslide near Hpakant, Kachin State in early July 2009; official figures are not available. The flood waters swept away homes, blocked roads and cut communications. The disaster is being blamed on jade mining, which creates large deposits of debris that block heavy rain from reaching natural rivers and drainage, including the Uru river.

About 100 jade mining companies operate in the Hpakant area. The Kachin Environmental Organization, based on the Sino-Burmese border, says that people living in the Hpakant area had appealed to the companies not to dump waste near the Uru River and to avoid environmental damage. The companies enjoy government backing, however, and local complaints are regularly ignored. [1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Hpakan Other Rock Mine (Myanmar)". aditnow.co.uk. Retrieved 2008-12-26. 
  2. ^ a b Richard W. Hughes and Fred Ward. "Heaven and Hell: The Quest for Jade in Upper Burma". Ruby-Sapphire.com. Retrieved 2008-12-26. 
  3. ^ Democratic Voice of Burma, Displaced by fighting, villagers take shelter in Hpakant, 22 October 2012, http://www.dvb.no/news/displaced-by-fighting-villagers-take-shelter-in-hpakant/23955
  4. ^ Violet Cho. "Gem Mining Destroying Environment, Activists Say". The Irrawaddy 25 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-26. 
  5. ^ John S. Moncreif and Htun Myat. "The War on Kachin Forests". The Irrawaddy October 2001, vol 9, no 8. Retrieved 2008-12-26. 
  6. ^ "Te Za mines jade with sophisticated equipment in Phakant". KachinNews.com, 5 July 2007. Retrieved 2009-01-06. 
  7. ^ "Kachin's Anti-Government Forces". Kachinstate.com. Retrieved 2009-01-06. 
  8. ^ "Two miners killed, seven injured on New Year eve explosion in Hpakant mine". KachinNews.com, 7 January 2009. Retrieved 2009-01-11. 

External links[edit]