Xi'an Xiguan Airport

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Xi'an Xiguan Airport
西安西关机场
Xī'ān Xīguān Jīchǎng
CAAC Ilyushin Il-14 Xian Airport 1984 King.jpg
CAAC Ilyushin Il-14 at Xiguan (1984)
IATA: SIAICAO: ZLSN
Summary
Airport type Public (defunct)
Serves Xi'an
Coordinates 34°22′36″N 109°7′12″E / 34.37667°N 109.12000°E / 34.37667; 109.12000Coordinates: 34°22′36″N 109°7′12″E / 34.37667°N 109.12000°E / 34.37667; 109.12000
Map
SIA is located in China
SIA
SIA
Location of airport in China
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
05/23 2,800 9,186 Concrete
Source: [1]

Xi'an Xiguan Airport (Chinese: 西安西关机场) (IATA: SIAICAO: ZLSN) is the former airport serving Xi'an, capital of China's Shaanxi Province. It was closed on 1 September 1991, when all flights were transferred to the new Xi'an Xianyang International Airport.[2][3]

History[edit]

During World War II, the airport was known as Hsian Airfield and was used by the United States Army Air Forces Fourteenth Air Force as part of the China Defensive Campaign (1942–1945). The Americans used the airport primarily as a photo-reconnaissance airfield, with unarmed P-38 Lightnings, equipped with aerial cameras flew over Japanese-held territory providing intelligence to the Chinese ground forces. In addition, P-61 Black Widow night interceptor aircraft flew from the airport, providing defense against night bombing raids by the Japanese, along with P-47 Thunderbolts day fighters and C-47 Skytrain transports flying in supplies and ammunition to support friendly forces in the area. The Americans closed their facilities at the airport after the end of the war in September 1945.[4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ Airport information for SIA / ZLSN at Great Circle Mapper. Source: DAFIF (effective Oct. 2006).
  2. ^ Accident history for SIA / ZLSN at Aviation Safety Network
  3. ^ "陕西年鉴1992". 
  4. ^ Maurer, Maurer. Air Force Combat Units Of World War II. Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Office of Air Force History, 1983. ISBN 0-89201-092-4
  5. ^ USAFHRA Document Search - Hsian