Harakmbut people

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Harakmbut
Q'Orianka Kilcher 1.JPG
Q'orianka Kilcher, actress of Huachipaeri and Quechua descent[1]
Total population
810 (1987/2000)[2][3]–5,000 (2011)[4]
Regions with significant populations
 Peru
Languages
Harakmbut languages (Amarakaeri and Huachipaeri)[5] and Spanish[3]
Religion
traditional tribal religion

The Harakmbut (Arakmbut, Harakmbet) are indigenous people in Peru that include two major groups, the Amarakaeri and Huachipaeri.

They speak Harakmbut languages. An estimated 5,000 Harakmbut people live in the Madre de Dios Region near the Brazilian border in the Peruvian Amazon[4]

Amarakaeri[edit]

location of Harakmbut

Amarakaeri are also called Amaracaire or Amarakaire people. Subgroups of their tribe include the Kochimberi, Küpondirideri, Wíntaperi, Wakitaneri, and Kareneri peoples. As of 1987, 500 Amarakaeri people lived near the Madre de Dios and Colorado Rivers. Some pan for gold as a means of subsistence.[2]

Huachipaeri[edit]

Huachipaeri are also known as Huachipaire or Wacipaire people. As of 2000, there were 310 Huachipaeri living near the upper Madre de Dios and Keros Rivers. Subgroups of the Huachipaeri including the following, with population figures from 2000:

  • Arasairi, population 20
  • Manuquiari, population 50
  • Puikiri (Puncuri), population 36–50
  • Sapiteri, population 12
  • Toyeri, population 10[3]

All the subgroups speak dialects of the Huachipaeri language.[3]

History[edit]

When the Harakmbut were first contacted by members of the Dominican Order in 1940, they numbered 30,000.[4]

Notable Harakmbut people[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yuan, Jada. "The Newcover: Q'orianka Kilcher." New York Movies. 18 Dec 2005. Retrieved 15 Feb 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Amarakaeri." Ethnologue. Retrieved 15 Feb 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d "Huachipaeri." Ethnologue. Retrieved 15 Feb 2012.
  4. ^ a b c "Peru: Indigenous Harakmbut Suffer Effects Of Climate Change." Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources. (retrieved 20 Feb 2011)
  5. ^ "Language Family Trees: Harakmbet." Ethnologue. Retrieved 15 Feb 2012.