Huarache (shoe)

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A modern-day Huarache

Huaraches(from the original warachi, also known as Purepecha or Tarascan About this sound wa'ɾatʃe , singular huarache) are a type of Mexican sandal. Pre-Columbian in origin, they gained popularity and notability from their use by the 1960s hippie generation.

History[edit]

Pre-Columbian in origin, the sandals are believed related to the cactle or cactli, of Náhuatl origin. The name "Huarache" is derived from the P'urhépecha language term kwarachi, and directly translates into English as sandal.[1]

Early forms have been found in and traced to the countryside farming communities of Jalisco, Michoacan, Guanajuato and Yucatan. Originally of all-leather construction, the thong structure around the main foot is still traditionally made with hand-woven braided leather straps.[2]

After originating in the peasant communities, they were adopted by some religious orders, such as the Franciscan friars. In the 1930s, wider variations began to appear, with soles derived from used rubber car tires - hence the modern "tread" form of sole. After the post-WW2 veterans started to travel deeper into Mexico, from the late 1950/1960's they started gaining popularity in North America thanks to their adoption as part of the 1960s hippy lifestyle. By the end of the 20th century they were to be found all over North and South America.

Styles[edit]

Making a huarache sandal at a workshop at the Museo de Arte Popular, Mexico City.

Traditional huarache designs vary greatly, but are always very simple. Originally made of all-leather, later early designs included woven string soles and occasionally thin wooden soles. Later more elaborate upper designs were created by saddlers and leather workers.

The modern huarache developed from the adoption in the 1930s of rubber soles developed from used rubber car-tires. Modern designs vary hence vary in style from a simplistic sandal to a more complex shoe, using both traditional leather as well as more modern synthetic materials. In recent times, the Sandals have been fashion: young people have returned to put on with thongs decorated with motifs that have revived the like to wear that kind of sandals.

Many shoes hence claim to be huaraches, but they are still traditionally only considered a huarache if they are handmade, and have a woven-leather form in the upper.[2]

Media[edit]

Huaraches are mentioned in the lyrics of the Beach Boys song Surfin' U.S.A.; and in the novel Ask the Dust, written by John Fante (the Camilla Lopez's shoes) also in the novel On The Road, written by Jack Kerouac. Skeeter Phelan wears a pair of the shoes, which her traditionalist Southern mother hates, in the Kathryn Stockett novel The Help. Doc Sportello, the detective from Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice, wears a pair of huaraches. He eventually loses one shoe and finishes the adventure using only the other one.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Free Translation and Professional Translation Services from SDL". Freetranslation.com. 2011-01-20. Retrieved 2012-01-19. 
  2. ^ a b "Huaraches.com | Information > Huarache History". Web.archive.org. 2010-12-07. Retrieved 2012-01-19.