Hudson Bay Railway (1997)

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For the original defunct railway, see Hudson Bay Railway (1910).
Hudson Bay Railway
Hudson Bay Railway logo.png
Route Map of Hudson Bay Railway.svg
HBRY in black and KR in grey
Reporting mark HBRY
Locale northern Manitoba
Dates of operation 1997–
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Headquarters The Pas, Manitoba
Website Hudson Bay Railway
Hudson Bay Railway
km
820 Churchill
Tidal
Goose Creek
Digges
Bylot
Lamprey
Chesnaye
junction to
Kischiayamweekemow
Cromarty
726 Belcher
M'Clintock
Back
O'Day
Kellett
663 Herchmer
Owl River
Silcox
Thibaudeau
Lawledge
600 Weir River
Weir River
Charlebois
Amery
junction to unfinished
Port Nelson line
Sundance
Limestone River
Bird
Jacam
Kettle Rapids
Nelson River
junction to Long Spruce
524 Gillam
Luke
Willbeach
Wivenhoe
Nonsuch
460 Ilford
Aiken River
Split Lake
Munk
Kelsey
Pit Siding
junction
Spring Lake
Boyd
Stitt
Nelson River,2nd crossing
Arnot
Armstrong River
Wilde
Armstrong Lake
Bridgar
Pikwitonei River
343 Pikwitonei
Matago
south
(Soab North and South Mines,
near Pisew Falls)
50 Thompson
Thompson Lake
Partridge Crop Lake
Wintering Lake
Middle Tremaine Lake
322 Sipiwesk
321 junction
Leven
296 Thicket Portage
McLaren Creek
Hockin
La Perouse
Earchman
Odhill
Lyddal
Medard
219 Wabowden
Pipun
Dunlop
Button
Ponton
Tyrrell
Turnbull
Wekusko
Paterson
Flin Flon
Flin Flon Creek
Channing
Schist Lake,Channing
Schist Lake
Schist Lake,2nd crossing
Schist Creek
Athapap
Limestone Narrows
Tincan Narrows
Athapapuskow Lake
Payuk
north Keewatin Railway, to Lynn Lake
Sherritt Jct
Cranberry Portage
Dyce
Rawebb
Simonhouse
Dering
66 Cormorant
Cormorant Lake
Halcrow
Atik
Budd
Wanless
Finger
Root Lake
Atikameg Lake
Orok
Tremaudan
Prospector
Flin Flon junction
Saskatchewan River
km 0 The Pas

Hudson Bay Railway (reporting mark HBRY) is a Canadian short line railway operating over 1,300 kilometres (810 mi) of track in northeastern Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba.

HBRY was formed by railroad holding company OmniTRAX in July 1997 to purchase former Canadian National Railway (CN) rail lines running north from The Pas, MB on two branches, one to Flin Flon, MB and on to Lynn Lake, MB, the other to Thompson, MB and on to the Port of Churchill on Hudson Bay. Operations began on August 20, 1997.

At the same time, OmniTRAX also took over the operation and marketing of the Port of Churchill from Transport Canada. Previous owner CN had limited the allowable tonnage to operate on the lines as a result of the light rail and poor track base. However, the HBRY has been able to successfully operate heavier rail cars and longer trains in recent years without difficulty, resulting in increased business to the Port of Churchill and from various mines and pulp mills.

HBRY is considered a vital transportation link in northern Manitoba, hauling ores and concentrates, copper, zinc, logs, kraft paper, lumber, and petroleum products. VIA Rail Canada also operates remote services on HBRY using its Hudson Bay passenger train between Winnipeg, MB and Churchill.

Major customers for HBRY include HudBay Minerals, Tolko, Vale, Gardwine North, Stittco Energy, Farmers of North America, and the Canadian Wheat Board.

History[edit]

The line was constructed by an earlier company of the same name. The Hudson Bay Railway was built starting in the early 1900s under Canadian Northern Railway before being taken over by the Government of Canada and completed in 1929. The lines were operated by Canadian National Railway from 1929-1997 before being sold to OmniTRAX.

2005 washout

On July 27, 2005, heavy rains washed out part of the railroad between The Pas and Pukatawagan; all service over the line, including Via Rail trains 290 and 291, was suspended while repairs took place.[1] Service was restored on August 2, 2005, two days ahead of initial expectations.[2]

2006 sale of Keewatin Railway
Main article: Keewatin Railway

On April 1, 2006, the Hudson Bay Railway sold the former CN Sherridon Subdivision, between Sheritt Junction and Lynn Lake, to the three native tribes in the area, who now own and operate the railway, running twice-weekly mixed (passenger plus freight) trains.

References in Popular Culture[edit]

  • The American novelist Courtney Ryley Cooper's 1931 adventure novel End of Steel is a fictionalized recounting of the line's original construction.
  • Calgary performer John Leeder wrote and recorded a song titled "Hudson Bay Line" about the rigors of bygone train travel on this route.[3] According to Leeder, "it's been recorded six times that I know of."[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]