Hulsean Lectures

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The Hulsean Lectures were established from an endowment made by John Hulse to Cambridge University in 1777.

The subject of the lectures was originally to be "The evidence of revealed religion; the truth and excellence of Christianity; the prophesies and miracles; direct or collateral arguments; the more difficult texts, or obscure parts of Holy Scripture". The lectures were originally to be given by a clergyman in the University, holding the degree of Master of Arts, who was under the age of forty years. Though the will made provisions for the lectureship, the funds were not enough to begin the lectures until 1820. In 1830 the number of annual lectures or sermons was reduced from 20 to eight; after 1861 they were further reduced to a minimum of four.

Lecturers[edit]

1820–50[edit]

1851–75[edit]

1876–1900[edit]

1901–25[edit]

1926–45[edit]

1946–75[edit]

1976–2000[edit]

2001–[edit]

References[edit]