Humane education

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Humane education is defined as the teaching of compassion and respect related to animal welfare, environmental, and social justice issues. It teaches relevant knowledge, skills, and commitment to live ethically, sustainably, and peaceably. It does this by infusing the curricula at all levels of education with meaningful information, inspiration, and tools for creating a safe and humane world for all(Selby, 1995). [1]

Humane education examines the challenges facing the planet, including human oppression and animal exploitation as well as materialism and ecological degradation. It explores how individuals might live with compassion and respect for all living beings.

The focus on citizenship makes humane education exceedingly compatible with other educational theories and models of reform, including service-learning and character and democratic education which all promote personal and global responsibility.(Itle-Clark)[2]

Humane education fosters kindness to all beings and examines the effect that choices have. Both personal and cultural choices affect the fate of other people, other species, and the Earth, and responsibility for creating a better world. Humane education achieves these goals by incorporating affective connections to cognitive learning (Piaget, 1963). Humane education promotes empathy and compassion towards all species.

AnimalHeroKids.org has free videos, and interactive, humane education presentations customized for all grade levels. Encouraging and recognizing Animal Hero Kids for 34 years. The importance of childhood instruction has been noted since the time of John Locke. In 1693 Locke made a prominent statement of the need to correct the cruelty of children. The birth of humane education as a national effort dates back to the late 19th century with the work done by George Angell and the formation of The Bands of Mercy and the MSPCA after he became familiar with the RSPCA. Another important event in humane education occurred in 1915. In that year, “Be Kind to Animals Week” was inspired Dr. William O’Stillman, leader of the American Humane Association. AHA’s primary goals were: visiting local schools to promote the development of humane education and publicizing the good works of the nation’s humane societies.(Unti, DeRosa)[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Itle-Clark, S. (2011). Humane education beyond the shelter: Developing humane pedagogy. The Packrat. Fall.
  • Selby, D. (1995). Earthkind: A teacher's handbook on humane education. London, England: Trentham Books Ltd.
  • Wagner, M. (2014). Humane education: Perspectives of practitioners on program evaluation efforts and analysis of changes in knowledge, attitudes, and empathy in two violence prevention and intervention programs. Antioch University). This dissertation is available in open access at AURA: Antioch University Repository and Archive http://aura.antioch.edu/etds/140/
  • Weil, Z. (2004). The Power and the Promise of Humane Education. New Society Publishers.
  • Unti, Bernard and Bill DeRosa. "Humane Education: Past, Present, and Future." The State of the Animals II: 2003. D.J. Salem and A.N. Rowam. eds. 2003 Washington, D.C.: Humane Society Press.
  1. ^ Earthkind: A Teacher's Handbook on Humane Education
  2. ^ Humane Education Beyond the Shelter: Developing Humane Pedagogy
  3. ^ Unti, Bernard and Bill DeRosa. "Humane Education: Past, Present, and Future." The State of the Animals II: 2003. D.J. Salem and A.N. Rowam. eds. 2003 Washington, D.C.: Humane Society Press.