Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute

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Not to be confused with HathiTrust.

The Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) is a research and teaching institute at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. HATII undertakes innovative research in Information, Communication, and Technology (ICT) in the cultural heritage and arts and humanities sectors. HATII focuses on research in archival and library science and in information/knowledge management with emphasis on their impact on the growth of the creative industries. Recognised research strengths are in the areas of humanities computing, digitisation, digital curation and preservation, and archives and records management. Members of HATII, most of whom have day-to-day experience of mediating information in a variety of formats, are currently addressing issues under the broad headings of access and re-usability, content analysis and appraisal, evaluation and impact technologies, and preservation/curation.

HATII offers an undergraduate programme of study in Arts and Media Informatics, postgraduate programmes in Information Management and Preservation (IMP) and eDiscovery and Computer Forensics (CFED), and it runs a doctoral programme.

HATII was established in 1997 to enhance Glasgow’s reputation as a centre of excellence in Humanities Computing and Information Studies, with Professor Seamus Ross as its Founding Director. HATII has, also, continued to promote discipline-based humanities computing by building on nearly two decades of pioneering initiatives and experience in the Faculty of Arts at Glasgow. More recently HATII is home to or partner in range of internationally recognised research activities, including AHDS Performing Arts, CASPAR digital preservation project, DigiCULT, Digital Curation Centre (DCC), DigitalPreservationEurope (DPE), DELOS Digital Preservation Cluster, ERPANET, Planets Project, Primarily History, Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951 and TheGlasgowStory.

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