Humboldt Peak (Colorado)

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Humboldt Peak
Humboldt Peak from near south colony lakes trailhead.jpg
Humboldt Peak (left of center) seen from Westcliffe, Colorado
Elevation 14,070. ft (4,289 m)[1][2]
Prominence 1,204 ft (367 m)[2]
Isolation 1.41 mi (2.27 km)[2]
Listing Colorado Fourteener
Location
Humboldt Peak is located in Colorado
Humboldt Peak
Humboldt Peak
Colorado
Location Custer County, Colorado, U.S.[3]
Range Sangre de Cristo Range, Crestones[2]
Coordinates 37°58′34″N 105°33′19″W / 37.9761111°N 105.5552855°W / 37.9761111; -105.5552855Coordinates: 37°58′34″N 105°33′19″W / 37.9761111°N 105.5552855°W / 37.9761111; -105.5552855[3]
Topo map USGS 7.5' topographic map
Crestone Peak, Colorado[3]
Climbing
Easiest route Hike/scramble

Humboldt Peak is a high mountain summit of the Crestones in the Sangre de Cristo Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 14,070-foot (4,289 m) fourteener is located in the Sangre de Cristo Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 11.9 miles (19.2 km) south-southwest (bearing 204°) of the Town of Westcliffe in Custer County, Colorado, United States.[1][2][3] The Crestones are a cluster of high summits in the Sangre de Cristo Range, comprising Crestone Peak, Crestone Needle, Kit Carson Peak, Challenger Point, Humboldt Peak, and Columbia Point.

Climbing[edit]

Humboldt Peak is the least challenging climb of the Crestones. The standard route on the peak is an exhausting hike along a trail of tears, with ache-inducing rock scrambling (Class 2) near the summit. The trail climbs the peak from the South Colony Lakes basin, accessed from the east side of the range. This basin is a popular site that is also the base for most climbs of Crestone Peak and Crestone Needle. A very rugged four-wheel drive road follows the South Colony drainage to near the Lakes; however, this road will be closed halfway up on October 13, 2009. There is a lower parking lot for two-wheel drive access at the San Isabel National Forest boundary. The climb involves 4,464 feet (1,361 m) of elevation gain in a 14-mile (23 km) round trip when done from the two-wheel drive access point, but only 3,100 feet (940 m) of gain in a 6-mile (9.7 km) round trip from the current high-clearance four-wheel drive access point. As of 8/30/2007, 2WD lot has been moved back. From here climb involves 5,200 feet (1,600 m) of elevation gain in an 18-mile (29 km) round trip. When hiking Humboldt be sure to stay right on the ridge because the left is the north face and drops steeply.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The elevation of Humboldt Peak includes an adjustment of +1.790 m (+5.87 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Humboldt Peak, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved October 20, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Humboldt Peak". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved October 20, 2014. 

External links[edit]