Hunt v. Cromartie

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Hunt v. Cromartie
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued August 4, 1999
Decided May 17, 1999
Full case name James B. Hunt, Jr., Governor of North Carolina, et al., Appellants v. Martin Cromartie, et al.
Citations 526 U.S. 541 (more)
Holding
The 12th district of North Carolina as drawn was unconstitutional because it was created for the purpose of placing African-Americans in one district thereby constituting illegal racial gerrymandering.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Thomas, joined by Rehnquist, O'Connor, Scalia, Kennedy
Concurrence Stevens, joined by Souter, Ginsburg, Breyer

Hunt v. Cromartie, 526 U.S. 541 (1999), was a United States Supreme Court case regarding the contentious North Carolina's 12th congressional district. In an earlier case, Shaw v. Reno, 517 U.S. 899 (1995), the Supreme Court ruled that the 12th district of North Carolina as drawn was unconstitutional because it was created for the purpose of placing African-Americans in one district thereby constituting illegal racial gerrymandering. The Court then ordered the state of North Carolina to redraw the boundaries of the district.

In this follow up case, the Supreme Court ruled that the state was able to justify the new boundaries of the 12th district by showing that it was intended to create a safe seat for Democrats, and therefore the redrawn district was a constitutional example of political gerrymandering. Justice O'Connor acted as the swing vote, satisfied with the change in reasoning since Shaw v. Reno.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Saunders, Melissa L. (2002). "A Cautionary Tale: Hunt v. Cromartie and the Next Generation of Shaw Litigation". Election Law Journal 1 (2): 173–194. doi:10.1089/153312902753610011. 

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