Huntingburg, Indiana

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Huntingburg, Indiana
City
Downtown Huntingburg
Downtown Huntingburg
Nickname(s): "Hollywood of the Midwest"
Motto: "A City Like No Other!"
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 38°17′49″N 86°57′16″W / 38.29694°N 86.95444°W / 38.29694; -86.95444Coordinates: 38°17′49″N 86°57′16″W / 38.29694°N 86.95444°W / 38.29694; -86.95444
Country United States
State Indiana
County Dubois
Government
 • Mayor Dennis Spinner (R)
Area[1]
 • Total 5.27 sq mi (13.65 km2)
 • Land 5.06 sq mi (13.11 km2)
 • Water 0.21 sq mi (0.54 km2)
Elevation 489 ft (149 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 6,057
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 6,050
 • Density 1,197.0/sq mi (462.2/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 47542
Area code(s) 812
FIPS code 18-35284[4]
GNIS feature ID 0436632[5]
Website http://www.huntingburg.org/

Huntingburg is a city in Dubois County, Indiana, United States. The population was 6,057 at the 2010 census. Located in southwestern Indiana, the city is known for its downtown with numerous antique shops. It is part of the Jasper Micropolitan Statistical Area. The city is also known as the "Hollywood of the Midwest." The movies A League of Their Own (1992), Hard Rain (1998), and the HBO film Soul of the Game (1996) were filmed in Huntingburg. Columbia Pictures built the grandstand at League Stadium that was to become part of the set for A League of Their Own.

League Stadium was home to the Dubois County Dragons who played in the Heartland League (1996–1998) and the Frontier League (1999–2002). From 1996-2001, Huntingburg was the smallest city to host a professional baseball team. After the Dragons franchise moved, League Stadium stood empty in the summers until the Bluff City Bombers of the Central Illinois Collegiate League moved to Huntingburg in 2005 and were renamed the Dubois County Bombers. The CICL then merged with the Prospect League. As the Prospect League has a larger geographical footprint, the Bombers moved to the Ohio Valley League as of the 2013 season.

As part of Dubois County, Huntingburg re-entered the Eastern Time Zone on November 4, 2007 after 15 months on the Central Time Zone.[6]

History[edit]

Huntingburg was platted in 1837 by Colonel Jacob Geiger who purchased 1,920 acres of land and became one of the city's first permanent settlers.[7][8] It was likely so named because the site had been a popular hunting ground.[9] Huntingburg was incorporated as a town in 1866.[8]

Geography[edit]

Huntingburg's water tower

Huntingburg is located at 38°17′49″N 86°57′16″W / 38.29694°N 86.95444°W / 38.29694; -86.95444 (38.296853, -86.954344).[10]

According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 5.27 square miles (13.6 km2), of which 5.06 square miles (13.1 km2) (or 96.02%) is land and 0.21 square miles (0.54 km2) (or 3.98%) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 2,527
1910 2,464 −2.5%
1920 3,261 32.3%
1930 3,440 5.5%
1940 3,816 10.9%
1950 4,056 6.3%
1960 4,146 2.2%
1970 4,794 15.6%
1980 5,376 12.1%
1990 5,242 −2.5%
2000 5,598 6.8%
2010 6,057 8.2%
Source: US Census Bureau

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,057 people, 2,334 households, and 1,554 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,197.0 inhabitants per square mile (462.2 /km2). There were 2,492 housing units at an average density of 492.5 per square mile (190.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 87.3% White, 0.5% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 9.9% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.5% of the population.

There were 2,334 households of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.4% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.4% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.11.

The median age in the city was 35.1 years. 27.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.3% were from 25 to 44; 23.6% were from 45 to 64; and 13.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.7% male and 52.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

Huntingburg City Hall

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 5,598 people, 2,162 households, and 1,444 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,543.3 people per square mile (595.4/km²). There were 2,267 housing units at an average density of 625.0 per square mile (241.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city is mostly White, 92.2%, Hispanic 9.8%, African American 0.2% two races or more 0.8%.

There were 2,162 households out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.2% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,415, and the median income for a family was $41,925. Males had a median income of $29,756 versus $22,167 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,882. About 6.8% of families and 10.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.3% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation[edit]

Airport[edit]

Huntingburg Airport is a public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) south of the central business district of Huntingburg. It is owned by the Dubois County Airport Authority.[11]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Places: Indiana". 2010 Census Gazetteer Files. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-04-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Smith, Mike (September 21, 2007). "5 counties do time warp again". The Journal Gazette. Associated Press. 
  7. ^ http://americanprofile.com/articles/col-jacob-geigers-favorite-hunting-grounds/
  8. ^ a b Wilson, George R. (1910). History of Dubois County from Its Primitive Days to 1910. pp. 365–366. 
  9. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 163. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ FAA Airport Master Record for HNB (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective May 31, 2012.

External links[edit]