Hurricane Ivan tornado outbreak

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Hurricane Ivan tornado outbreak
Date(s) September 15 – 18, 2004
Duration 2 days, 13 hours, 27 minutes[nb 1]
Tornadoes caused 120[nb 2]
Maximum rated tornado F3 (Fujita scale)
Damages $96.9 million[nb 3]
Casualties 7 total + 3 non-tornadic

The Hurricane Ivan tornado outbreak was a three-day tornado outbreak that was associated with the passage of Hurricane Ivan across the Southern United States starting on September 15, 2004 across the Gulf Coast states of Alabama and Florida as well as southern Georgia before ending in the Middle Atlantic Coast on September 18. The outbreak killed 7 people and injured dozens of others across several states from Florida to Pennsylvania. The hurricane itself killed at least 90 people from the US to the eastern Caribbean Islands. Overall it produced 120 tornadoes surpassing the record of 117 that was previously held by Hurricane Beulah during the 1967 Atlantic hurricane season. Ivan also produced 16 more tornadoes than Hurricane Frances which struck most of the same regions (the tornado outbreak) about ten days earlier.


Meteorological synopsis[edit]

Track of Hurricane Ivan

On September 13, 2004, as Category 5 Hurricane Ivan moved through the Yucatan Channel,[4] the Storm Prediction Center noted the possibility of isolated tornadoes for parts of Louisiana and the Florida Panhandle three days out.[5] Though the storm weakened while approaching the United States, strong low-level wind shear along its northeastern periphery allowed for the development of potentially tornadic supercells.[6] A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hurricane Hunter aircraft intercepted Ivan during the afternoon and evening of September 15. During the mission, dropwindsondes were deployed off the Gulf Coast to assess the rainband environment. By this time, an intense band of thunderstorms, with embedded supercells, developed about 250 mi (400 km) east of the hurricane's center. A thermodynamic sounding around 1:00 p.m. EST from Tampa Bay, Florida revealed unusually favorable conditions for deep, rotating convection. Ahead of the band, convective available potential energy (CAPE) levels reached 2,500 J/kg and significant helicity.[7] The significant levels of CAPE, accompanied by a dry air intrusion between the rainband and the main convection of Ivan, were the primary cause of the outbreak. A comparison between Ivan and Hurricane Jeanne revealed that both storms encountered similar conditions near landfall; however, CAPE values were lower during Jeanne and the system produced far fewer tornadoes.[8]

Tracks of the 50 mesocyclones and multiple tornado vortex signatures (denoted by inverted red triangles) identified by the NWS Office in Tallahassee Florida between 1:00 p.m. on September 15 to 9:00 a.m. on September 16.

In light of the increased tornado threat, the first tornado watch was issued around 1:00 p.m. EST for the Florida Panhandle and southern Alabama.[9] By then, "miniature" supercell thunderstorms began approaching the coastline. Data from Doppler weather radar indicated mesocyclones within several of the cells, though mostly while over water. At the onset of the outbreak, three cells exhibited signature characteristics of supercell thunderstorms: cyclonic updraft and a hook-like appendage. Similar to storms over the Great Plains, a mid-level rear flank downdraft was present; however, this feature did not reach the surface.[7] Less than an hour after the watch was issued, the first tornado of the outbreak touched down in Escambia County, Florida. Over the course of the next 20 hours, the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Tallahassee monitored over 50 mesocyclones that had sufficient vorticity to spawn tornadoes. The high number of potential storms led to the issuance of 130 tornado warnings, of which only 20 later verified. One of the mesocyclones had a "nearly textbook appearance" and produced four tornadoes between 8:15 p.m. and 9:50 p.m. as it traveled nearly 75 miles across the Florida Big Bend.[1][2] Two of these tornadoes reached F2 intensity and, collectively, they killed four people, injured eight more, and left $5.5 million in damage. By midnight on September 15, 26 tornadoes had touched down across three states.[1]

With the tornado threat gradually moving northward, new tornado watches were issued further north into much of South Carolina.[10] During the first half of September 16, several F0 tornadoes touched down across the Southeast.[1] By the afternoon, downstream subsidence limited thunderstorm activity; however, as the day wore on, sufficient warm, moist air from the Gulf Stream and breaks in cloud cover allowed for CAPE values to rise.[11] Extensive convective banding to the north and east of the storm continued to encounter extreme levels of helicity. Subsequently, numerous rotating thunderstorms developed over the region, especially across Georgia and South Carolina.[12] Throughout the afternoon, 22 tornadoes touched down across the two states, one of which, an F2, killed one person.[1] The majority of the activity took place along a warm front that developed east of Tropical Storm Ivan within the shear maxima.[13]

Following a lull in activity during the overnight hours between September 16 and 17, conditions once more became increasingly favorable for tornadoes across North Carolina and Virginia. Strong shear associated with the weakening tropical cyclone and the destabilization of air ahead of the main rainband and consequently, a tornado watch was issued for portions of both states around 10:00 a.m.[14]

Tornado event[edit]

Outbreak death toll
State Total County County
total
Florida 6 Bay 2
Calhoun 4
Georgia 1 Franklin 1
Totals 7
All deaths were tornado-related

The tornado outbreak began during the early afternoon of September 15, when the first outer rain bands and thunderstorms moved ashore across the southern states. One person was killed in Panama City, Florida when a tornado tore through the city damaging many businesses. The tornado that hit just before 4:00 PM was caught on camera as it skirted just outside a local television station that was doing severe weather coverage as tornado warnings were issued in the Panama City media market area.[15] At the same time, another deadly tornado touched down in Bay County, Florida killing 1 when a wood-frame home was lifted and smashed, killing an occupant.[16] Later during the evening many other tornadoes touched down across the Panhandle region of west Florida. An F2 tornado in Calhoun County, Florida tossed mobile homes in the air, killing two occupants in each of 2 mobile homes.[17] At the same time the center of the hurricane was approaching the Florida/southern Alabama state and coastline near Gulf Shores. At least 26 tornadoes were confirmed during the day.

After the cyclone made landfall near Gulf Shores, Alabama, the tornado activity shifted further north into central Alabama and the northern half of Georgia as well as South Carolina. One person was killed in Franklin County, Georgia by an F2 tornado that damaged several businesses and homes. 32 tornadoes were confirmed on that day.[18] As the remnants of Ivan, now a tropical depression moved further inland, increased instability and thunderstorm cells produced a large tornado outbreak from the northern Carolinas to Pennsylvania. Virginia was the hardest hit state during the day as nearly 40 tornadoes affected the state.[19] Several F2s and one F3 did touched down causing significant damage to numerous structures including homes and businesses. Areas roughly to the west and south of Washington D.C were the hardest hit areas. Nearly 60 tornadoes were confirmed on that day before the outbreak ceased during the overnight hours of September 18 across Maryland.

Confirmed tornadoes[edit]

Confirmed tornadoes by Fujita rating
F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 Total
48 53 18 1 0 0 120

September 15 event[edit]

Confirmed tornadoes during the September 15–18, 2004 tornado outbreak[nb 4][nb 5]
F# Location County / Parish State Coord. Date Time (UTC) Path length Max width Damage Summary
F0 W of Perdido Key Escambia, Baldwin (AL) FL, AL 30°18′N 87°29′W / 30.30°N 87.48°W / 30.30; -87.48 (Perdido Key (September 15, F0)) September 15 1853–1906 70005000000000000005 miles (8.0 km) 700130000000000000030 yd (27 m) $6,000 A fast-moving, weak tornado touched down near Perdido Key and caused minor damage before dissipating southwest of Josephine, Alabama.[20][21]
F0 E of Pensacola Beach Escambia, Santa Rosa FL 30°20′N 87°00′W / 30.333°N 87.000°W / 30.333; -87.000 (Pensacola Beach (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 1955–2003 700112000000000000012 miles (19 km) A weak tornado touched down in a sparsely populated area east of Pensacola and caused only minor damage before dissipating near Gulf Breeze.[22][23]
F0 Beacon Hill area Gulf FL 29°55′N 85°23′W / 29.917°N 85.383°W / 29.917; -85.383 (Beacon Hill (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2035–2037 70003000000000000003 miles (4.8 km) A short-lived tornado caused minor damage to several homes in Beacon Hill. Several trees and power lines were also felled.[24]
F1 SW of Panama City Bay FL 30°06′N 85°45′W / 30.100°N 85.750°W / 30.100; -85.750 (Panama City (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 2040–2050 70005000000000000005 miles (8.0 km) 1 death – A strong F1 tornado touched down near the St. Andrews recreation area, where it damaged dozens of commercial structures. Traveling northward, the storm then moved through Grand Lagoon. There, one person was killed when a real estate office was destroyed and seven others were injured in a restaurant. The tornado came within 100 yards (91 m) of the WJHG-TV station before dissipating. Overall, damage from this event was estimated at $5 million.[25]
F0 Centerville area Early GA 31°16′N 84°54′W / 31.267°N 84.900°W / 31.267; -84.900 (Centerville (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2040 69995000000000000000.5 miles (0.80 km) Brief tornado downed trees and power lines.[26]
F1 Allanton area Bay FL 29°59′N 85°24′W / 29.983°N 85.400°W / 29.983; -85.400 (Allanton (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 2043–2052 70005000000000000005 miles (8.0 km) 1 death – Shortly after the previous tornado touched down, another formed near Allanton. This storm lofted a wood frame home, with seven people inside, about 60 feet (18 m) into a field; one person was killed and another was injured. Several other homes were damaged before the tornado dissipated.[27]
F0 Blakely area Early GA 31°23′N 84°57′W / 31.383°N 84.950°W / 31.383; -84.950 (Blakely (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2055–2057 70001000000000000001 mile (1.6 km) Brief tornado caused minor damage to a county jail. Scattered trees and power lines were also felled.[28]
F1 Cedar Grove area Bay FL 30°08′N 85°10′W / 30.133°N 85.167°W / 30.133; -85.167 (Cedar Grove (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 2100–2107 70006000000000000006 miles (9.7 km) Another F1 tornado touched down in Bay County, this time near Cedar Grove, and destroyed several homes along its path. Losses from the storm reached $2 million.[29]
F0 S of Damascus Early GA 31°15′N 84°43′W / 31.250°N 84.717°W / 31.250; -84.717 (Damascus (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2116 70002000000000000002 miles (3.2 km) A short-lived tornado caused minor damage to a few homes. Several trees and power lines were also felled.[30]
F0 Colquitt area Miller GA 31°07′N 84°41′W / 31.117°N 84.683°W / 31.117; -84.683 (Colquitt (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2137–2142 70004000000000000004 miles (6.4 km) A weak tornado struck Colquitt, damaging nine homes and two businesses.[31]
F0 W of Arlington Calhoun GA 31°26′N 84°48′W / 31.433°N 84.800°W / 31.433; -84.800 (Arlington (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2142 69992000000000000000.2 miles (0.32 km) A brief tornado downed trees and power lines.[32]
F1 Whigham area Grady GA 30°51′N 84°17′W / 30.850°N 84.283°W / 30.850; -84.283 (Whigham (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 2219–2241 700115000000000000015 miles (24 km) A relatively long-lived tornado damaged five homes and several chicken houses in Whigham. Numerous trees and power lines were also felled by the storm, blocking off many roads.[33]
F0 W of Dixie Escambia AL 31°09′N 86°45′W / 31.150°N 86.750°W / 31.150; -86.750 (Dixie (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2220–2223 70003000000000000003 miles (4.8 km) Weak tornado caused minor tree damage.[34]
F0 S of Castleberry Conecuh AL 31°16′N 87°01′W / 31.267°N 87.017°W / 31.267; -87.017 (Castleberry (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2240–2242 70001000000000000001 mile (1.6 km) Brief tornado caused minor tree damage.[35]
F1 S of Hoggard Mill Baker GA 30°09′N 84°28′W / 30.150°N 84.467°W / 30.150; -84.467 (Hoggard Mill (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 2307 70001000000000000001 mile (1.6 km) Several trees were twisted or uprooted and power lines were felled.[36]
F0 SE of Youngstown Bay FL 30°20′N 85°24′W / 30.333°N 85.400°W / 30.333; -85.400 (Youngstown (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 2320–2328 70007000000000000007 miles (11 km) A weak tornado downed numerous trees and power lines.[37]
F1 Crestview area Baker GA 31°20′N 84°37′W / 31.333°N 84.617°W / 31.333; -84.617 (Hoggard Mill (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 2327 70001000000000000001 mile (1.6 km) Several trees were twisted or uprooted and power lines were felled. The tornado also caused minor structural damage.[38]
F0 NW of Chipley Washington FL 30°39′N 85°29′W / 30.650°N 85.483°W / 30.650; -85.483 (Chipley (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 0037–0052 700112000000000000012 miles (19 km) A relatively long-lived, but weak tornado caused minor damage to several homes. Several trees and power lines were also felled.[39]
F1 NE of Bonifay Holmes FL 30°51′N 85°29′W / 30.850°N 85.483°W / 30.850; -85.483 (Bonifay (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 0055–0100 70004000000000000004 miles (6.4 km) An F1 tornado destroyed one home and damaged several others.[40]
F0 NW of Carrabelle Franklin FL 29°54′N 84°44′W / 29.900°N 84.733°W / 29.900; -84.733 (Carrabelle (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 0115–0120 70005000000000000005 miles (8.0 km) Numerous trees were uprooted between Carrabelle and Morgan Place.[41]
F1 SE of Wilma Liberty FL 30°03′N 84°51′W / 30.050°N 84.850°W / 30.050; -84.850 (Wilma (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 0130–0140 700110000000000000010 miles (16 km) An F1 tornado tracked through the Apalachicola National Forest where it uprooted hundreds of trees.[42]
F1 Dunnellon area Marion FL 29°03′N 82°28′W / 29.050°N 82.467°W / 29.050; -82.467 (Dunnellon (Sep. 15, F1)) September 15 0145 70004000000000000004 miles (6.4 km) One home was destroyed in Dunnellon and numerous trees were uprooted. In Rainbow Springs, roofing material was reported to have fallen on roads.[43]
F2 N of Blountstown Calhoun FL 30°30′N 85°03′W / 30.500°N 85.050°W / 30.500; -85.050 (Blountstown (Sep. 15, F2)) September 15 0207–0218 70007000000000000007 miles (11 km) 4 deaths – A strong F2 tornado touched down near Blountstown and tracked northwestward. After crossing Highway 69, it damaged dozens of homes and uprooted trees. Shortly thereafter, it moved through the Macedonia Community where three trailers were destroyed and 30 homes damaged. Within the community, four people were killed and five others were injured after their mobile homes were thrown into other structures. The tornado subsequently dissipated near Altha. Overall losses from the event reached $2.5 million.[44]
F0 Williston area Levy FL 29°23′N 82°27′W / 29.383°N 82.450°W / 29.383; -82.450 (Williston (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 0217 69992000000000000000.2 miles (0.32 km) Brief tornado with no damage reported by emergency management.[45]
F0 Bronson area Levy FL 29°27′N 82°39′W / 29.450°N 82.650°W / 29.450; -82.650 (Bronson (Sep. 15, F0)) September 15 0222 69992000000000000000.2 miles (0.32 km) Brief tornado with no damage reported by emergency management.[46]
F2 E of Marianna Jackson FL 30°43′N 85°10′W / 30.717°N 85.167°W / 30.717; -85.167 (Marianna (Sep. 15, F2)) September 15 0231–0250 70008000000000000008 miles (13 km) The final Florida tornado on September 15 touched down east of Marianna and struck the Gold Drive Trailer Park. There, it destroyed 25 mobile homes and damaged 10 more. Three people sustained injuries in Gold Drive. Tracking northwest, the storm moved through the Brogdon Lane Trailer Park and damaged 10 more mobile homes and subsequently caused significant damage to the Marianna Federal Correctional Institution. The tornado then destroyed the Sykes Enterprises facility near Marianna Municipal Airport before dissipating. Overall losses from the storm reached $3 million.[47]

September 16 event[edit]

List of reported tornadoes – Thursday, September 16, 2004
F#
Location
County
Coord.
Time (EST)
Path length
Comments/Damage
Alabama
F0 E of Troy (1st tornado) Pike 31°48′N 85°57′W / 31.800°N 85.950°W / 31.800; -85.950 (Troy (Sep. 16, F0)) 12:25 a.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado downed several trees.[48]
F0 S of Clio Barbour 31°41′N 85°37′W / 31.683°N 85.617°W / 31.683; -85.617 (Clio (Sep. 16, F0)) 12:56 a.m. 0.2 miles (0.32 km) Brief tornado downed several trees.[49]
F0 E of Troy (2nd tornado) Pike 31°48′N 85°45′W / 31.800°N 85.750°W / 31.800; -85.750 (Troy (Sep. 16, F0)) 1:05 a.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado downed several trees.[50]
F0 E of Snowdoun Montgomery 32°15′N 86°13′W / 32.250°N 86.217°W / 32.250; -86.217 (Snowdoun (Sep. 16, F0)) 1:49 a.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado downed several trees.[51]
F0 E of Clayton Barbour 31°53′N 85°19′W / 31.883°N 85.317°W / 31.883; -85.317 (Clayton (Sep. 16, F0)) 3:05 a.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado downed several trees.[52]
F0 SE of Tuskegee Macon 32°20′N 85°35′W / 32.333°N 85.583°W / 32.333; -85.583 (Tuskegee (Sep. 16, F0)) 4:00 a.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado downed several trees.[53]
Florida
F0 NE of Lloyd Jefferson, Leon 30°31′N 83°58′W / 30.517°N 83.967°W / 30.517; -83.967 (Lloyd (Sep. 16, F0)) 4:45 a.m. – 4:50 a.m. 5.5 miles (8.9 km) A weak tornado touched down near Lake Miccosukee and tracked northeast, damaging two homes and destroying a shed. Numerous trees and power lines were felled by the storm.[54][55]
F0 Steinhatchee area Taylor 29°41′N 83°24′W / 29.683°N 83.400°W / 29.683; -83.400 (Steinhatchee (Sep. 16, F0)) 8:50 a.m. 0.2 miles (0.32 km) A waterspout moved onshore near Steinhatchee and caused minor damage to several homes.[56]
Georgia
F0 E of Williamsburg Dougherty 31°29′N 84°03′W / 31.483°N 84.050°W / 31.483; -84.050 (Williamsburg (Sep. 16, F0)) 6:30 a.m. – 6:33 a.m. 2 miles (3.2 km) A weak tornado damaged several homes and felled many trees. A portion of Georgia State Route 133 near Pecan City was temporarily closed due to downed trees.[57]
F0 S of Ambrose Coffee 31°30′N 83°01′W / 31.500°N 83.017°W / 31.500; -83.017 (Ambrose (Sep. 16, F0)) 10:35 a.m. 2 miles (3.2 km) A short-lived tornado damaged several homes and sheds. One mobile home was also blown off its foundation.[58]
F1 NNE of Colbert Madison 31°30′N 83°01′W / 31.500°N 83.017°W / 31.500; -83.017 (Colbert (Sep. 16, F1)) 2:05 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. 7 miles (11 km) An F1 tornado touched down near Georgia State Route 72 and tracked north-northwest towards a country club. There, five large homes sustained extensive damage. Twenty other homes were also damaged by the tornado before it dissipated near the Madison County High School in Danielsville. Overall losses from the storm reached $1.3 million.[59]
F0 Paoli area Madison 34°05′N 83°06′W / 34.083°N 83.100°W / 34.083; -83.100 (Paoli (Sep. 16, F0)) 2:33 p.m. 1 mile (1.6 km) A brief tornado destroyed one barn destroyed and damaged several homes.[60]
F0 N of Yatesville Upson 32°59′N 84°08′W / 32.983°N 84.133°W / 32.983; -84.133 (Paoli (Sep. 16, F0)) 2:42 p.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado caused minor tree damage.[61]
F2 Franklin Springs area Franklin 34°17′N 83°09′W / 34.283°N 83.150°W / 34.283; -83.150 (Franklin Springs (Sep. 16, F2)) 2:50 p.m. – 2:53 p.m. 2 miles (3.2 km) Strong tornado struck the town of Franklin Springs, damaging or destroying 25 residential structures. Additionally, the local fire and police stations sustained damage. Overall losses from the storm reached $1.1 million.[62]
F1 Red Hill area Franklin 34°23′N 83°15′W / 34.383°N 83.250°W / 34.383; -83.250 (Red Hill (Sep. 16, F1)) 3:15 p.m. – 3:20 p.m. 3.5 miles (5.6 km) A tornado damaged several homes and downed numerous trees and power lines.[63]
F0 S of Griffin Spalding 33°13′N 84°16′W / 33.217°N 84.267°W / 33.217; -84.267 (Griffin (Sep. 16, F0)) 3:21 p.m. 0.2 miles (0.32 km) Brief tornado touched down near the Griffin-Spalding Airport. Several large trees were significantly damaged and many others were uprooted. A few homes sustained minor roof damage.[64]
F1 Tignall area Wilkes 33°52′N 82°44′W / 33.867°N 82.733°W / 33.867; -82.733 (Tignall (Sep. 16, F1)) 4:10 p.m. 7 miles (11 km) Relatively large tornado, measured up to 500 yd (460 m) wide, caused significant damage in Tignall and Norman. A total of 23 structures were damaged along the storm's path to varying degrees. Numerous trees and power lines were downed, twisted, or uprooted. Additionally, a large communications tower was destroyed. Overall losses from the storm reached $1.5 million.[65]
F1 SE of Fortsonia Elbert 34°00′N 82°46′W / 34.000°N 82.767°W / 34.000; -82.767 (Fortsonia (Sep. 16, F1)) 4:18 p.m. – 4:29 p.m. 7.5 miles (12.1 km) Tornado touched down near Fortsonia and damaged a house. One person inside the house sustained injuries. Damage along the remainder of the path was confined to trees.[66]
F1 NNE of Elberton Elbert 34°13′N 82°49′W / 34.217°N 82.817°W / 34.217; -82.817 (Elberton (Sep. 16, F1)) 4:38 p.m. – 4:40 p.m. 1 mile (1.6 km) Brief tornado damaged trees and power lines.[67]
F2 W of Franklin Springs Franklin 34°17′N 83°16′W / 34.283°N 83.267°W / 34.283; -83.267 (Franklin Springs (Sep. 16, F2)) 4:45 p.m. – 4:53 p.m. 5.5 miles (8.9 km) 1 death – Strong tornado touched down west of Franklin Springs and damaged many buildings, vehicles, and trees. One person was killed after her car was hit by a fallen tree. A passenger in the car was also injured.[68]
F1 WSW of Orange Cherokee 34°44′N 84°22′W / 34.733°N 84.367°W / 34.733; -84.367 (Orange (Sep. 16, F1)) 4:55 p.m. – 4:56 p.m. 1 mile (1.6 km) Brief tornado downed dozens of trees, many of which fell on homes and vehicles, resulting in four injuries. Six homes were damaged by the downed trees and losses from the storm reached $300,000.[69]
F1 Reed Creek area Hart 34°27′N 82°55′W / 34.450°N 82.917°W / 34.450; -82.917 (Red Creek (Sep. 16, F1)) 5:15 p.m. – 5:17 p.m. 1.5 miles (2.4 km) Tornado downed numerous trees and power lines. One home was damaged by a fallen tree.[70]
F1 Cornelia area Habersham 34°31′N 83°31′W / 34.517°N 83.517°W / 34.517; -83.517 (Cornelia (Sep. 16, F1)) 7:30 p.m. – 7:33 p.m. 2 miles (3.2 km) Tornado downed numerous trees and power lines.[71]
F1 S of Altman Screven 32°40′N 81°37′W / 32.667°N 81.617°W / 32.667; -81.617 (Altman (Sep. 16, F1)) 8:10 p.m. – 8:25 p.m. 6 miles (9.7 km) Tornado bent or snapped numerous trees.[72]
F1 NW of Sylvania Screven 32°49′N 81°42′W / 32.817°N 81.700°W / 32.817; -81.700 (Sylvania (Sep. 16, F1)) 8:40 p.m. – 8:56 p.m. 7 miles (11 km) Tornado bent or snapped numerous trees.[73]
South Carolina
F0 N of Aiken Aiken 33°36′N 81°43′W / 33.600°N 81.717°W / 33.600; -81.717 (Aiken (Sep. 16, F0)) 1:56 p.m. – 2:08 p.m. 6 miles (9.7 km) Tornado downed numerous trees along an intermittent track.[74]
F1 NNE of Saluda Saluda 34°04′N 81°44′W / 34.067°N 81.733°W / 34.067; -81.733 (Saluda (Sep. 16, F1)) 3:00 p.m. – 3:12 p.m. 6 miles (9.7 km) A barn was destroyed, while several mobile homes, two cars and several framed homes were damaged. One person was injured by the storm.[75]
F0 SE of Laurens Laurens 34°22′N 81°51′W / 34.367°N 81.850°W / 34.367; -81.850 (Laurens (Sep. 16, F0)) 4:12 p.m. 0.5 miles (0.80 km) Brief tornado downed a few trees.[76]
F0 SSE of Townville Anderson 34°31′N 82°52′W / 34.517°N 82.867°W / 34.517; -82.867 (Townville (Sep. 16, F0)) 5:25 p.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief tornado damaged a few trees.[77]
F0 SE of Walhalla Oconee 34°38′N 82°54′W / 34.633°N 82.900°W / 34.633; -82.900 (Walhalla (Sep. 16, F0)) 5:35 p.m. – 5:43 p.m. 5 miles (8.0 km) Tornado downed several trees and power lines.[78]
F0 W of Iva Anderson 34°18′N 82°43′W / 34.300°N 82.717°W / 34.300; -82.717 (Iva (Sep. 16, F0)) 5:40 p.m. 0.1 miles (0.16 km) Brief touchdown in an open field.[79]
F1 Westminster area Oconee 34°40′N 83°06′W / 34.667°N 83.100°W / 34.667; -83.100 (Westminster (Sep. 16, F1)) 5:55 p.m. – 6:02 p.m. 4.5 miles (7.2 km) A mobile home was destroyed and a few other homes were damaged by fallen trees. Numerous trees and power lines were also downed.[80]
Source: Tornado History Project - September 16, 2004 Storm Data, NCDC Storm Events Database

September 17 event[edit]

List of reported tornadoes – Friday, September 17, 2004
F#
Location
County
Coord.
Time (EST)
Path length
Comments/Damage
North Carolina
F0 Waco area Cleveland 35°22′N 81°26′W / 35.367°N 81.433°W / 35.367; -81.433 (Waco (Sep. 17, F0)) 5:05 a.m. – 5:06 a.m. 0.9 miles (1.4 km) Several structures had their roofs blown off and numerous trees and power lines were downed.[81]
F1 Stokesdale area Guilford, Rockingham 36°11′N 79°59′W / 36.183°N 79.983°W / 36.183; -79.983 (Stokesdale (Sep. 17, F1)) 10:09 a.m. – 10:25 a.m. 15.3 miles (24.6 km) Tornado tracked through Stokesdale and caused widespread damage. Three homes were destroyed, nine were severely damaged and fifty-two others were affected. Seventy percent of the trees in a heavily wooded area near the town were snapped or uprooted.[82] Continuing into Rockingham County, the tornado damaged several more homes and destroyed a double-wide trailer before dissipating.[83]
F0 NW of Vass Moore 1555 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
Damage to trees and power lines.
F0 W of Pittsboro Chatham 1625 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
Damage to trees and power lines.
Virginia
F2 W of Collinsville Henry, Franklin 1504 8.8 miles
(14.1 km)
40 vehicles were damaged or destroyed at a factory which sustained significant damage. There was roof and tree damage at a subdivision. A residential garage was damaged by a fallen tree, and two semi-trucks were overturned. 4 people were injured.
F2 E of Stewartsville Bedford 1612 3 miles
(4.8 km)
A poorly constructed building was destroyed. Homes sustained roof damage and trees were downed.
F0 N of Straightstone Pittsylvania 1724 0.3 miles
(0.5 km)
Brief touchdown with no damage.
F1 NE of Rustburg Campbell 1754 1.9 miles
(3 km)
Many trees were downed, one of which crushed a car. Homes sustained minor damage, and a garage lost its roof.
F1 W of Thomas Terrace Campbell 1759 3 miles
(4.8 km)
Trees were snapped and uprooted and sheds were damaged. A trampoline was thrown 200 yards.
F0 N of Earlysville Albemarle 1844 0.3 miles
(0.5 km)
Brief touchdown with no damage.
F3 Remington area Fauquier 1902 9 miles
(14.4 km)
Several homes in a subdivision had their roofs torn off, and one home was shifted from its foundation. Garages and outbuildings were destroyed, and large trees were snapped and uprooted. Maximum structural damage was F2, as the F3 rating was based on a car that was lofted more than 75 yards over trees and power lines. Two people were injured.
F2 S of Stanardsville Greene 1905 5 miles
(8 km)
4 homes, a trailer and a mobile home were destroyed with over 50 structures sustaining damage. 3 people were injured.
F1 W of Mannboro Amelia 1908 1.5 miles
(2.4 km)
A garage was lifted off its foundation and had its roof removed. Trees were downed as well.
F0 E of Riverton Warren 1910 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F2 E of Fletcher Madison 1912 8 miles
(12.8 km)
A garage was destroyed and several homes were damaged. There was extensive damage to trees in the Rapidan Wildlife Management Area and Shenandoah National Park.
F2 Warrenton area Fauquier 1912 8 miles
(12.8 km)
Tornado damaged two subdivisions. Projectiles were speared into homes, trees, and vehicles. Large trees were snapped and uprooted.
F1 NW of Woodford Caroline 1915 1.5 miles
(2.4 km)
A cinder-block detached garage was destroyed, and a mobile home was destroyed by a falling tree. Two vehicles were damaged and trees were snapped. Several homes sustained minor damage.
F2 N of Opal Fauquier 1924 13 miles
(20.8 km)
Tornado caused severe tree damage and some structural damage.
F0 NE of Massaponax Spotsylvania 1929 2 miles
(3.2 km)
Minor damage to trees and a few homes.
F0 Fredericksburg area Fredericksburg 1936 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
Brief tornado scattered some debris.
F2 Winchester area Frederick 1939 5 miles
(8 km)
A detached parking garage was destroyed, while three homes sustained roof damage. A platform deck was blown away and an office trailer was overturned. Numerous trees were snapped and uprooted.
F1 E of Daffan Stafford 1942 6 miles
(9.6 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 Manakin area Goochland 1950 1 miles
(1.6 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 SW of Oakland Louisa 1956 1.5 miles
(2.4 km)
Two house trailers were blown into a creek. Numerous trees were snapped as well.
F0 Short Pump area Henrico 1959 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
Minor damage to homes occurred, with shingles torn off and garage doors blown in.
F0 Holladay area Spotsylvania 2005 0.1 miles
(0.16 km)
Brief touchdown with no damage.
F1 W of Danton Orange 2015 3 miles
(4.8 km)
Two homes were heavily damaged and several trees were uprooted.
F1 S of Lovettsville Loudoun 2020 12 miles
(20.8 km)
A farmhouse, outbuildings and a horse barn were damaged or destroyed, and two horses were injured by debris.
F2 SE of Independent Hill Prince William 2026 4 miles
(6.4 km)
Tornado snapped or uprooted many large hardwood trees. Some of the trees fell on houses and other structures. A vehicle was moved several feet, and homes sustained roof damage.
F2 E of Everona Orange 2028 7 miles
(11.2 km)
A mobile home, horse trailer, and two silos were destroyed. A tree was thrown onto a house and a mobile home was destroyed
F1 N of Mitchells Culpeper 2036 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
12 homes sustained significant damage and a shed was lifted from its foundation. Numerous trees were uprooted.
F1 SW of Winchester Frederick 2037 9 miles
(14.4 km)
Barns, outbuildings and a garage were damaged. One home was destroyed, and 100 others were damaged due to falling trees.
F0 N of Hanover Hanover 2040 1 miles
(1.6 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 Manassas area Manassas, Prince William, Manassas Park, Fairfax 2040 3.5 miles
(5.6 km)
Several structures and trees were damaged.
F0 E of Taylorsville Caroline 2042 1 miles
(1.6 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 S of Alanthus Culpeper 2050 0.1 miles
(0.16 km)
A house and its garage lost portions of its roof. Tree branches were snapped.
F2 Chantilly area Fairfax 2055 7 miles
(3.2 km)
One home was destroyed and 50 others were damaged. Many trees and power lines were downed and one person was injured.
F1 W of McDuff Caroline 2111 1.5 miles
(2.4 km)
Damage limited to trees, although one falling tree damaged one home.
F2 Dulles International Airport area Loudoun, Montgomery (MD) 2112 8 miles
(24 km)
Seven buildings were damaged and a tractor-trailer was overturned near Dulles Airport. A few structures were also damaged in Maryland.
F1 W of Port Royal Caroline 2123 2 miles
(3.2 km)
2 homes were heavily damaged and numerous trees were snapped.
F1 S of Fairview Beach King George 2125 7 miles
(11.2 km)
Frame homes were damaged by falling trees. A barn and two outbuildings sustained significant damage.
F1 SW of Oilville Goochland 2134 0.2 miles
(0.32 km)
Numerous trees were downed and a house lost part of its roof.
F0 NW of Durand Greensville 2135 0.8 miles
(1.3 km)
A few homes were damaged and trees were downed.
Pennsylvania
F1 NW of Wardfordsburg Fulton 2030 0.5 miles
(0.8 km)
A tractor barn was leveled, and a house roof and another barn were damaged. Tall grass and corn was flattened, and trees were downed.
F1 N of Worleytown Franklin 2214 2 miles
(3.2 km)
Damage to trees and several structures.
F1 E of Markes Franklin 2228 2.5 miles
(4 km)
Damage to trees and several structures.
F1 NE of Germantown Franklin 2318 1.5 miles
(2.4 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 SW of Tatesville Bedford 2330 3.5 miles
(5.6 km)
One home and some farm buildings were damaged. Extensive crop damage occurred at six farms. Many trees were downed as well.
F1 SE of Yount Bedford 2340 2.3 miles
(3.7 km)
Sporadic damage, including to trees and one barn.
F1 N of Oakville Cumberland 2355 2 miles
(3.2 km)
Damage to trees, farmhouses, and farm buildings occurred.
F1 S of Arch Rock Juniata 0005 1 miles
(1.6 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 NE of Arch Rock Juniata 0010 4.5 miles
(7.2 km)
Several structures were damaged and corn fields were flattened. Trees were downed as well.
Maryland
F1 N of Brunswick Frederick, Washington 2110 4 miles
(6.4 km)
In Frederick County, the tornado destroyed outbuildings and other structures. Other buildings sustained roof damage and trees were downed. In Washington County, the tornado downed more trees, some of which landed on homes.
F1 Poolesville area Montgomery 2142 3 miles
(4.8 km)
A few structures were damaged and trees were downed.
F0 N of Wellington Beach Charles 2142 3 miles
(4.8 km)
Damage limited to trees.
F1 Frederick area Frederick 2154 7 miles
(11.2 km)
Minor structural damage to a few homes. Windows were blown out, shingles were peeled off, and chimneys collapsed. Several trees were downed as well.
F2 N of Burkittsville Frederick 2250 3 miles
(4.8 km)
Major tree damage occurred at Catoctin Mountain Park.
West Virginia
F1 E of Tanco Heights Jefferson 2240 2 miles
(3.2 km)
Homes sustained roof and siding damage, and trees were downed.
F2 Darkesville area Berkeley 2250 2 miles
(3.2 km)
Several homes and businesses sustained significant structural damage. Tractor-trailers and vehicles were flipped, and 6 people were injured.
F0 Sleepy Creek area Morgan, Washington (MD) 2334 1 miles
(1.6 km)
Damage limited to trees.
Source: Tornado History Project - September 17, 2004 Storm Data, NCDC Storm Events Database

September 18 event[edit]

List of reported tornadoes – Saturday, September 18, 2004
F#
Location
County
Coord.
Time (EST)
Path length
Comments/Damage
Maryland
F1 Joppatowne area Harford 39°26′N 76°22′W / 39.433°N 76.367°W / 39.433; -76.367 (Joppatowne (Sep. 18, F1)) 2:40 a.m. – 2:43 a.m. 1 mile (1.6 km) A short-lived tornado downed several trees and peeled the siding off a few homes. One of the trees fell on a home, causing extensive roof damage and breaking most of the windows.[84]
F2 Pylesville area Harford 39°42′N 76°22′W / 39.700°N 76.367°W / 39.700; -76.367 (Pylesville (Sep. 18, F2)) 3:00 a.m. – 3:10 a.m. 2 miles (3.2 km) A short-lived tornado destroyed two mobile homes and damaged several other structures. Numerous large trees were also twisted or uprooted.[85]
Source: Tornado History Project - September 18, 2004 Storm Data, NCDC Storm Events Database

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ Thomas P. Grazulis and Bill McCaul (2011). "List of Known Tropical Cyclones Which Have Spawned Tornadoes". Tornado History Project. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
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  8. ^ Adam K. Baker, Matthew D. Eastin, and Matthew D. Parker (February 2009). "Environmental Ingredients for Supercells and Tornadoes within Hurricane Ivan". Weather and Forecasting (American Meteorological Society) 24 (1): 223–244. doi:10.1175/2008WAF2222146.1. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
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  10. ^ Greg L. Dial and Jeffry S. Evans (September 16, 2004). "Tornado Watch 830". Storm Prediction Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
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  12. ^ Gregory Carbin (September 16, 2004). "Mesoscale Discussion 2221". Storm Prediction Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
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  22. ^ "Florida Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. 2004. Retrieved November 3, 2011. 
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  26. ^ "Georgia Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. 2004. Retrieved November 5, 2011. 
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  83. ^ "North Carolina Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. 2004. Retrieved February 10, 2012. 
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Notes
  1. ^ First tornado touched down at 1:53 p.m. on September 15 and the last dissipated at 3:10 a.m. on September 18.[1]
  2. ^ Sources differ on the number of tornadoes during the outbreak. The National Climatic Data Center indicates 119 tornadoes;[1] the Tallahassee, Florida branch of the National Weather Service states approximately 117 tornadoes;[2] Thomas P. Grazulis and Bill McCaul state 127 tornadoes.[3]
  3. ^ All damage figures in the article are in 2004 United States dollars (USD)
  4. ^ All dates are based on the local time zone where the tornado touched down; however, all times are in Coordinated Universal Time for consistency.
  5. ^ All damage totals are in 2004 USD

External links[edit]