Hurry Up, We're Dreaming

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Hurry Up, We're Dreaming
Studio album by M83
Released 18 October 2011 (2011-10-18)
Genre Electronic, synthpop, dream pop, new wave, shoegaze, indie rock
Length 79:05
Label Naïve/Mute
Producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen, Anthony Gonzalez
M83 chronology
Saturdays = Youth
(2008)
Hurry Up, We're Dreaming
(2011)
Oblivion
(2013)
Singles from Hurry Up, We're Dreaming
  1. "Midnight City"
    Released: 16 August 2011 (2011-08-16)
  2. "Reunion"
    Released: 5 February 2012 (2012-02-05)
  3. "OK Pal"
    Released: 30 July 2012 (2012-07-30)
  4. "Steve McQueen"
    Released: 27 November 2012 (2012-11-27)
  5. "Wait"
    Released: 5 December 2012 (2012-12-05)

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming is the sixth studio album by French electronic band M83. The double album was released on 18 October 2011 by Naïve Records in France and Mute Records in the United States.[1][2] The album was produced by Justin Meldal-Johnsen, mixed by Tony Hoffer and has received generally positive reviews.[3][4] In addition, it debuted at number fifteen on the US Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 21,000 copies, becoming M83's highest-charting album to date.[5] The album was nominated for Best Alternative Music Album at the 2013 Grammy Awards.

Production[edit]

Background and recording[edit]

Prior to recording Hurry Up, We're Dreaming, Anthony Gonzalez had moved from his native France to Los Angeles. Describing the move in an interview, Gonzalez said: "Having spent 29 years of my life in France, I moved to California a year and a half before the making of this album and I was excited and inspired by so many different things: by the landscape, by the way of life, by live shows, by movies, by the road trips I took alone... I was feeling alive again and this is, I feel, something that you can hear on the album"[6] Gonzalez's tour with The Killers, Depeche Mode and Kings of Leon, in addition to his road trips to Joshua Tree National Park also heavily influenced the album.[7][8] Gonzalez cited the ambitiousness of albums such as Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness as the reason he made Hurry Up, We're Dreaming a double album. In addition, he described the two discs as brother and sister, with each track having a sibling on the other disc.[7] The album was recorded in Los Angeles at Sunset Studio and The Sound Factory.[9] Because of budget constraints and union issues, the string and brass players who contributed to the album were not paid and were credited with pseudonyms.[8]

Gonzalez recorded the album as a way to remember his childhood.[10] Gonzalez explained to Spin magazine that Hurry Up, We're Dreaming is "mainly about dreams, how every one is different, how you dream differently when you're a kid, a teenager, or an adult. I'm really proud of it. If you're doing a very long album, all the songs need to be different and I think I've done that with this one."[11] In an interview with musicOMH, he described the album as "a reflection of my 30 years as a human being" and something he dedicated to himself.[12]

Style[edit]

Gonzalez described the album's sound as a mix between the synthpop of Saturdays = Youth and the more ambient work of Before the Dawn Heals Us.[11] Additionally, the album uses instruments not found on previous M83 albums, such as acoustic guitar and saxophone.[13] Hurry Up, We're Dreaming also features contributions from Medicine's Brad Laner and Zola Jesus.[11] Critics have noted musical influences from '80s artists such as Kraftwerk, Simple Minds, Peter Gabriel and Harold Faltermeyer, as well as modern electronic artists such as Cut Copy.[14][15][16]

Release[edit]

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming was first teased on 23 June 2011 in a YouTube video titled "Echoes...", which also announced North American tour dates.[17][18] The album's lead single, "Midnight City", premiered online on 19 July 2011,[19][20] and was officially released on 16 August 2011.[21] On 10 October 2011, the album was streamed in its entirety on the Urban Outfitters website.[22] Urban Outfitters also hosted a simultaneous listening party at all of its stores the Saturday before Hurry Up, We're Dreaming's release.[23] On 17 October 2011, a music video for "Midnight City" was released.[24] On May 30, 2012, a music video for the album's second single, "Reunion," was released. The "Reunion" music video is a followup to the "Midnight City" music video.[25] On October 25, 2012, a music video for "Steve McQueen" was released.[26] The track "Outro" was used as the backing music for the extended trailer created for the upcoming film Cloud Atlas. On November 5, 2012, a three disc deluxe edition featuring remixes of "Midnight City," "Reunion" and "Steve McQueen" was announced.[27] On December 5, 2012, a music video for "Wait" was released.[28]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 76/100[4]
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[29]
The A.V. Club B−[30]
The Daily Telegraph 4/5 stars[31]
Drowned in Sound 5/10[32]
NME 7/10[33]
Pitchfork Media 9.1/10[14]
PopMatters 7/10[34]
Slant Magazine 2.5/5 stars[35]
Spin 7/10[36]
Under the Radar 9/10 stars[37]

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming received mostly positive reviews from music critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalised rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 76, based on 37 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[4] Pitchfork Media's Ian Cohen gave Hurry Up, We're Dreaming a "Best New Music" designation, dubbing it "the best M83 record yet" and adding that "the traditionally structured songs here are some of the most thrilling pop music released this year. The heavily saturated synths Gonzalez favored early in his career invited plenty of My Bloody Valentine comparisons, but whereas pure shoegaze of that nature attempts to overwhelm and obliterate, Hurry Up is like a sonic planetarium, penetrable and totally geared toward enhancing the user experience."[14] The Daily Telegraph's James Lachno gave the album four out of five stars and stated: "On top of booming synth-pop templates, [Gonzalez's] cosmic compositions arch off in weird directions, incorporating blues-bar sax solos, Afrobeat slap bass, swooping strings, psychedelic imagery and—really—a children's story all about frogs. It's surprisingly exhilarating stuff."[31] Under the Radar's Laura Studarus gave the album nine stars out of ten, calling it a "double album of stunningly ambitious, synth-soaked dreams" as well as a "remarkable accomplishment".[37] The Independent critic Simon Price deemed the album "[e]xtraordinary" and praised it as "a towering city of sparkling synth edifices simultaneously summoning the best of the 1980s (New Order, The Cure) and the current breed (The Knife, Empire of the Sun)".[38] Heather Phares of Allmusic rated the album four out of five stars and noted: "More than any of M83's other albums, Hurry Up, We're Dreaming feels like a destination to explore; while it may not be quite as striking as Saturdays = Youth, it delivers a welcome mix of classic sounds and promising changes."[29] Rudy Klapper of Sputnikmusic complimented the influence of 1980s music on the album, writing: "In its execution, the record is near flawless, an essential distillation of the sounds of Gonzalez's youth, nostalgia and melancholy and happiness all mixed up into a sparkling pop stew."[39] In a review for the NME, Jamie Crossan compared the album to Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's 1943 novella The Little Prince, stating: "If Anthony Gonzalez [...] is like the aviator, having imagined this double album while in the Joshua Tree desert in California, Hurry Up, We're Dreaming is itself the Little Prince: guileless and dreamy. Quite a bold statement to make, but this is an album of equal valour."[33] Reef Younis of BBC Music felt that "[w]hile some consistency may have been sacrificed in favour of a space-filling selection of tracks, this set still represents a heaving, breathing journey through the introspective and the bombastic, the striving and the exhaustive. It is the undeniable sound of one man's triumphant dreams."[40]

Not all reviews were entirely positive, though. David Marchese of Spin commented that while "the album is full of goose-bump moments: Zola Jesus' majestic vocal cameo on 'Intro'; the radiant keyboard riff and blooming melody of 'Steve McQueen'; and the glistening white noise of 'Echoes of Mine,'" the album's "lack of something as enjoyably plain (and relatively calm) as 'Kim & Jessie,' from 2008's Saturdays =Youth, makes Gonzalez's insistence on oversize emotions feel a tad restrictive. The little ones matter, too."[36] Timothy Gabriele of PopMatters opined that, although "M83 lose much of their impact on Hurry Up, We're Dreaming by focusing too much on magnitude throughout and too little on depth", the "totality of sound" on the album "has a way of blinding even the most critical listener to the problems that underline many of the album's lesser songs—weak choruses, unfinished ideas, and a repetition of previously successful formulas."[34] The A.V. Club's Christian Williams found the album underwhelming, concluding: "[F]or an album of such impressive scale and nanoscopic attention to detail, Dreams [sic] leaves a surprisingly light impression."[30] In a similarly mixed review, Drowned in Sound's Mary Bellamy remarked: "Double albums are necessarily somewhat hit and miss. That's part of their pick'n'mix charm. But M83 mostly miss me here. For each post-'Kim and Jessie' slice of pungent Eighties-rehabilitation pop cheese [...] there are two tracks that sound just how you'd imagine Eighties Genesis [...] For each enjoyably blatant Lemon Jelly rip [...] or modest Eno-recalling interlude [...] there's a track where you fully expect Jim Kerr to descend from the gods hooting and dressed as a flower."[32] Kevin Liedel of Slant Magazine criticised the album for rehashing sounds from earlier M83 albums and expressed: "[U]ltimately Hurry Up, We're Dreaming sounds much more like an M83 wannabe's poor imitation than the real deal."[35]

Accolades[edit]

Publication Country Accolade Year Rank
eMusic US Best Albums of 2011[41] 2011 2
Filter US Top 10 of 2011[42] 2011 1
Paste US The 50 Best Albums of 2011[43] 2011 9
Pitchfork Media US Top 50 Albums of 2011[44] 2011 3
Popmatters US The 75 Best Albums of 2011[45] 2011 5
Spin US The 50 Best Albums of 2011[46] 2011 19
Stereogum US The 50 Best Albums of 2011[47] 2011 12

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming has appeared on several end-of-year lists. Filter name it the best album of 2011.[42] Paste named Hurry Up, We're Dreaming the 9th best album of 2011, writing "As with everything the Frenchman's done so far, the album is lush and ably produced, crescendo after crescendo."[43] Pitchfork Media named it the third best album of 2011, with Jayson Greene writing: "Hurry Up We're Dreaming doesn't just draw liberally from the spirit of the massive rock albums Gonzalez name-checked, it practically swallows them whole, regurgitating and redistributing them into something listeners from every corner of the music universe can hear a piece of their lives in."[44] Popmatters ranked Hurry Up, We're Dreaming #5 on its list of the top 75 albums of 2011, while Spin ranked the album #19 on its end-of-year list.[45][46] Online music retailer eMusic ranked the album #2 on its Best Albums of 2011 list.[41]

The track "Midnight City" has been singled out for praise. Paste named it the second best song of the year.[48] PopMatters named the track the best song of 2011, with Ryan Reed writing: "On this transcendent standout [...] Anthony Gonzalez and co-synth-scientist Justin Meldal-Johnsen build layer upon layer of keys, arena-sized drums, and vocal atmospherics (not mentioning one of the tastiest sax solos this side of a Springsteen record). The result? The synth Sistine Chapel."[49]

Tour[edit]

M83 on the Hurry Up, We're Dreaming tour, November 2011 at Music Box Theater.

Prior to the tour, Gonzalez posted an open audition on the M83 website for a multi-instrumentalist who could play guitar, bass and keyboards to join him on tour.[50] Sparta Township, New Jersey native Jordan Lawlor won the audition.[51]

The tour for Hurry Up, We're Dreaming began in Mexico City on October 15, 2011 and ended December 1, 2011 in London, England.[52] A second leg of the tour began January 12, 2012 in Los Angeles and was originally going to end August 8, 2012 in New York, New York. During this second leg, M83 performed at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on April 13 and 20, at the St Jerome's Laneway Festival in Australia and New Zealand, and at Lollapalooza in Chicago, Illinois.[53][54] The tour was later extended and ended in London on 8 November.

Track listing[edit]

All songs composed by Anthony Gonzalez, except "Splendor" written by Anthony Gonzalez and Brad Laner.[55] Additional music composition by Justin Meldal-Johnsen. Additional lyrics by Yann Gonzalez, Morgan Kibby and Brad Laner.

CD 1
No. Title Length
1. "Intro"   5:22
2. "Midnight City"   4:03
3. "Reunion"   3:55
4. "Where the Boats Go"   1:46
5. "Wait"   5:43
6. "Raconte-moi une histoire"   4:04
7. "Train to Pluton"   1:15
8. "Claudia Lewis"   4:31
9. "This Bright Flash"   2:23
10. "When Will You Come Home?"   1:23
11. "Soon, My Friend"   3:09
Total length:
37:34
Interlude
No. Title Length
1. "Mirror" (downloadable bonus track[1][20]) 5:45
CD 2
No. Title Length
1. "My Tears Are Becoming a Sea"   2:31
2. "New Map"   4:22
3. "OK Pal"   3:58
4. "Another Wave from You"   1:53
5. "Splendor"   5:06
6. "Year One, One UFO"   3:17
7. "Fountains"   1:21
8. "Steve McQueen"   3:48
9. "Echoes of Mine"   3:39
10. "Klaus I Love You"   1:44
11. "Outro"   4:07
Total length:
35:46
Deluxe edition disc 3
  1. "Midnight City" (Eric Prydz Private remix)
  2. "Midnight City" (Trentemøller remix)
  3. "Midnight City" (Team Ghost remix)
  4. "Reunion" (Mylo remix)
  5. "Reunion" (Sei A remix)
  6. "Reunion" (White Sea remix)
  7. "Steve McQueen" (Maps remix)
  8. "Steve McQueen" (BeatauCue remix)

Personnel[edit]

The following people contributed to Hurry Up, We're Dreaming:[56]

Charts[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]