Hyde Park Township, Cook County, Illinois

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This article is about the former township in Cook County, Illinois. For the Chicago community area, see Hyde Park, Chicago.
Coordinates: 41°47′39″N 87°35′38″W / 41.79417°N 87.59389°W / 41.79417; -87.59389
Hyde Park Township
Former Township
Hyde Park Township.PNG
The original boundaries of Hyde Park Township, imposed on a current map of Chicago
Country United States
State Illinois
County Cook
Elevation 591 ft (180.1 m)
Coordinates 41°47′39″N 87°35′38″W / 41.79417°N 87.59389°W / 41.79417; -87.59389
Population 85,000 (1889)
Organized 1861
 - Disbanded 1889
Timezone CST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Location of Hyde Park Township in Illinois

Hyde Park Township is a former civil township in Cook County, Illinois, United States that existed as a separate municipality from 1861 until 1889 when it was annexed into the city of Chicago.[1] Its borders are Pershing Road (formerly 39th Street) on the north, State Street on the west, Lake Michigan and the Indiana state line on the east, and 138th Street and the Calumet River on the south.[2] This region comprised most of what is now known as the South Side of Chicago.

During Chicago's initial explosive growth, it developed from an adjacent rural area to a developed residential, commercial and resort community. However, due to infrastructure limitations, legislative incentives and the lure of better municipal services it, along with numerous adjoining townships, agreed to be annexed into the city of Chicago, creating the largest city in the United States at that time.

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

Paul Cornell, the founder of Hyde Park

The township was founded by Paul Cornell, who paid for a topographical survey of the lakefront south of the city in 1852.[3] In 1853, following the advice of Senator Stephen Douglas, he bought 300 acres (1.21 km2) of speculative property between 51st Street and 55th Street and set about developing the first Chicago railroad suburb.[4][5][6] This area was 7 miles (11.27 km) south of the mouth of the Chicago River and 6 miles (9.66 km) south of downtown Chicago. In the 1850s, Chicago was still a walkable urban area well contained within a 2 miles (3.22 km) radius of the center.[6] He selected the name Hyde Park to associate the area with the elite neighborhood of Hyde Park in New York as well as the famous royal park in London.[7] By 1855 he began acquiring large land tracts, which he would subdivide into lots for sale in the 1870s.[8]

In 1837, the City of Chicago incorporated, and by the 1870s the surrounding townships had followed suit.[2] After 1850, Cook County was divided into basic governmental entities,[9] which were designated as townships as a result of the new Illinois Constitution.[2][10] Illinois's permissive incorporation law empowered any community of 300 resident citizens to petition the Illinois legislature for incorporation as a municipality under a municipal charter with more extensive powers to provide services and tax local residents.[2][11] Hyde Park Township was created by the Illinois General Assembly in 1861 within Cook County.[12] This empowered the township to better govern the provision of services to its increasingly suburban residents.[10]

Annexation and current status[edit]

Following the June 29, 1889 elections,[13] several suburban townships voted to be annexed to the city, which offered better services, such as improved water supply, sewerage, and fire and police protection.[2][11] Hyde Park Township, however, had installed new waterworks in 1883 just north of 87th Street. Nonetheless, the majority of voters in 1889 supported annexation perhaps because of the city’s water system for fire prevention.[14] or because of the belief that township government had become too unwieldy.[10] After the 1889 annexation Chicago was able to leverage efficiencies as the largest United States city in area and second largest in population.[14]

The township has no current governmental structure or functions,[1] other than being used by the Cook County Assessor's office for taxation valuation and record keeping purposes.[15] The Hyde Park Historical Society also offers middle school and high school awards with eligibility based on the historical boundaries.[16] Hyde Park was the site of the Columbian Exposition of 1893, and is also the location of the University of Chicago, which was founded two years after Hyde Park was annexed into Chicago, in 1891.

Location[edit]

Hyde Park included the entirety of the following community areas (see map, below right): Hyde Park (41), Kenwood (39), Woodlawn (42), South Shore (43), South Chicago (46), East Side (52), Hegewisch (55), Avalon Park (45), Calumet Heights (48), South Deering (51), Burnside (47), Pullman (50), and Riverdale (54) as well as the Southern part of Oakland (36) and the eastern parts of Grand Boulevard (38), Washington Park(40), Greater Grand Crossing (69), Chatham (44), Roseland (49), and West Pullman (53).

Demographics[edit]

When first created the township had only 350 residents.[3] The creation of the Union Stock Yards in 1865 changed the evolutionary path of Hyde Park and the neighboring Lake Township, which became the industrial center while Hyde Park became the middle class enclave.[3] The population of the township grew from 3,600 in 1870 to 15,700 ten years later.[17] By 1889 the population had reached 85,000.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Keating, Ann Durkin (2005). "Hyde Park Township". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Keating, Ann Durkin (2005). "Annexations and Additions to the City of Chicago". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  3. ^ a b c Pacyga, Dominic A., Chicago Journal, "Hyde Park - from the 1830s to the beginning of Urban Renewal," pp. 5-7, November 25, 1981.
  4. ^ "Graveyards of Chicago Oak Woods Cemetery". Hucke, Matt. 2002. Retrieved 2007-04-11. 
  5. ^ Sawyers, June Skinner, Chicago Portraits, "Paul Cornell", pp. 56-7, Loyola University Press, 1991, ISBN 0-8294-0701-4.
  6. ^ a b Conzen, Michael P. (2005). "Commuting". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  7. ^ "Hyde Park Community Collection". Chicago Public Library. Retrieved 2007-04-11. 
  8. ^ Best, Wallace (2005). "Greater Grand Crossing". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  9. ^ "Townships: Townships After 1850". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. 2005. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  10. ^ a b c Keating, Ann Durkin (2005). "Townships". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  11. ^ a b Teaford, Jon C. (2005). "Government, Suburban". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  12. ^ Orum, Anthony (2005). "Governing the Metropolis". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  13. ^ Cain, Louis P. (2005). "Annexation". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  14. ^ a b Cain, Louis P. (2005). "Annexations". The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. Chicago Historical Society. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  15. ^ "Reassessment Notices for Hyde Park Township Mailed". Cook County Assessor's Office. 2006-09-01. Retrieved 2007-07-18. [dead link]
  16. ^ "2005 Hyde Park Historical Society Neighborhood History Awards". Hyde Park Historical Society. 2005. Retrieved 2007-07-20. 
  17. ^ Louise Carroll Wade, Chicago's Pride: The Stockyards, Packingtown, and Environs in the Nineteenth Century (University of Illinois Press; 1st Pbk. Ed edition, 2002), p. 148

References[edit]

  • Keating, Ann Durkin. Building Chicago: Suburban Developers and the Creation of a Divided Metropolis. 1988.
  • Miller, Donald L. City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America pp. 282–284; 292.