Hyde farm estate

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The Hyde Farm Estate is a residential area situated in Balham, a district of south London, in the United Kingdom. Unlike the rest of Balham, it is wholly within the London Borough of Lambeth. Its boundaries are: to the south Emmanuel Road; to the east: Radbourne Road; to the north: Hydethorpe Road; and to the west: Cavendish Road.

Historically, the estate was one large medieval field of some sixty acres located at the southern edge of the parish of Clapham. The area was known as the Hyde during the Middle Ages, and later as Hydefield. In 1587 the field was purchased by Richard Martyn who then sold it to Emmanuel College, Cambridge, which had been founded three years earlier. The names of Emmanuel Road and Scholars Road commemorate this history.[1] The Hyde farm was reputedly particularly well known for its pigs.[2]

The Hyde Farm Estate was developed between 1896 and 1916. Prior to development starting, the historic field boundary with Tooting Common was realigned. The narrow strip of the common to the east of Cavendish Road was enclosed and the line of Emmanuel Road (formerly Bleak Hall Lane) was moved north to provide a compensating wider portion of common land to the north of the railway line between Streatham Hill and Balham (now known as Emmanuel Field).

The E Hayes-Dashwood Foundation was established in 1946 to provide low-cost housing to infirm or disabled ex-servicemen and their widows.[3] It now owns approximately one hundred and fifty of the properties in the area, most of the remainder having been sold to leaseholders or to other housing associations.

Hyde Farm Conservation Area[edit]

A substantial proportion of the eastern side of the Hyde Farm estate was built to a consistent design by Ernest Hayes-Dashwood in red brick with characteristic bow windows. On 13 February 1996 the London Borough of Lambeth designated a portion of the estate (between Haverhill Road and Radbourne Road) [4] as a Conservation Area under the Civic Amenities Act 1967. Because of the uniform appearance of the houses and the survival of so many original doors and windows, since 2002 the area of the Conservation Area has also been subject to an Article Four Direction restricting changes without specific consent from Lambeth as the planning authority.[5]

Coordinates: 51°26′38″N 0°08′20″W / 51.444°N 0.139°W / 51.444; -0.139