Hype Energy

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Hype Energy
Hype Energy Logo
Type Energy drink
Introduced 1993
Variants Hype Energy, Hype Energy Up, Hype Energy MFP, Hype MFP Zero Max, Hype Energy Enlite, Hype Energy Shot
Website www.hype.com

Hype Energy is a range of energy drinks distributed in over 40 countries across the world including the USA and Canada.[1] First launched in 1994 by Hard Rock Cafe founder Barry Cox,[2] the company has been headed since May 2000 by former Formula One racing driver, Bertrand Gachot.[3]

Products[edit]

  • Hype Energy (introduced in 2000) [4] – Packaged in a blue can embossed with a silver Hype Energy logo. The lightly carbonated drink contains elderberry and cranberry fruit juice, which give it a natural red colour. Other ingredients include taurine, guarana, ginseng, caffeine and ten vitamins: Vit C, Vit B3 (niacin), Vit B5, Vit E, Vit B6, Vit B2, Vit B1, Vit B12, Vit B9 and Vit B8 (folic acid). Hype Energy is free from artificial colours and preservatives.
  • Hype Energy MFP (introduced in 2006) [5] – Packaged in a black, carbon fibre-effect can with a silver Hype Energy logo and a solid black ring pull. The lightly carbonated drink is gold in colour and has a unique, citric sweet flavour. Ingredients include taurine, guarana, ginseng, glucuronolactone, caffeine and four vitamins: Vit B3 (niacin), Vit B5, Vit B6 and Vit B12. Hype Energy MFP is free from artificial colours and preservatives.
  • Hype Energy Enlite (introduced in 2007) [6] – Packaged in a pink can, Enlite is the low calorie version (about one fifth of the regular products' sugar content, 9.9kcal/100ml) of Hype Energy MFP. The pale pink coloured drink includes ingredients such as taurine, guarana, ginseng, caffeine and four vitamins: Vit B3 (niacin), Vit B5, Vit B6 and Vit B12. It is a lightly carbonated beverage and is free from artificial preservatives.
  • Hype Energy Shots (introduced in 2009) [7] – Available in Hype Energy MFP flavour, these powerful, non-carbonated shots claim to provide an "energy boost" that lasts approximately four hours with no "jitters" or crash to follow.
  • Hype Energy UP (introduced in 2013) - Package in a blue can, this is the new version of the original fruity Hype Energy drink. It contains an "ice berry mix", a blend of elderberry and cranberry with a cool mint ice after taste effect. It also has 10 vitamins, guarana and ginseng.
  • Hype Energy MFP Zero Max (introduced in 2013) - This is the sister product to Hype's MFP flavour. Packaged in a white carbon fibre designed can to match the original black MFP can. The Zero Max is the 7th addition to Hype Energy's range if you include their origin.

Hype Energy drinks are available in 250ml and 500ml aluminium cans for Europe, and 8.4fl oz and 16fl oz aluminum cans for the USA and Canada. Hype Energy Shots come in 74ml bottles in the USA and Canada, and 60ml bottles in Europe and the Middle East.[8]

Hype Energy also manufactures a shot glass, introduced in 2000, which has two compartments. A Hype Energy drink can be poured into the bottom compartment and vodka or a similar alcoholic shot is poured into the top compartment. The liquids only mix upon drinking.[9]

History[edit]

Hype Energy was first developed in 1993 by Ashley Roy, Nigel Spiro,[10][11] and Andrew Barshall[12][13] and backed by Hard Rock Cafe founder, Barry Cox.[14] Under Spiro and Managing Director David Harris Hype Energy became heavily involved in motor-sport by first sponsoring the Arrows Formula One team [15] and subsequently Benetton,[16] Williams,[16] a NASCAR outfit and several motorbike teams. Associated with the Formula One party lifestyle and with a strong presence in the paddock, Hype Energy committed to considerable amounts of sponsorship in an attempt to achieve global recognition and establish worldwide distribution. In 1997, having established a credible brand, Hype Corporation (the holding company) decided to pull back from the sport to focus on resolving manufacturing difficulties, which were restricting further growth.

In 1997, former Formula One racing driver and 24 Hours of Le Mans winner, Bertrand Gachot,[17] signed a distribution agreement with Hype Energy in order to introduce the product to France. Gachot was one of a handful of distributors who remained committed to the brand and in 1998, he approached the Swiss licensor to buy the company holding the Hype Energy trademarks. In May 2000, after two years of negotiation, Gachot came to an agreement and restructured the company. Until 2000 Hype Energy had four products in its portfolio: Hype MFP with a strawberry and cranberry flavour, Hype Energy Morning Rush with a citrus flavour, Hype Passion Attack with passion fruit and Hype Night Boost with peach. In May 2000, the company launched a new version of Hype Energy into selected markets. The culmination of 18 months of development, Hype Energy now used fresh fruit juice, contained ten vitamins and had no artificial colours or preservatives, as it was pasteurized.

The improved Hype Energy product gave the company a substantial boost. It was first launched in France and the Persian Gulf, then the USA and Canada, and by 2001 it had achieved significant global growth. The brand is now present in more than 40 countries across the globe from the USA, Canada, Honduras and Panama to Africa and the Middle East. Hype Energy is manufactured in the USA, Canada and the Netherlands. It has offices in Spain, Dubai and New York.

Sponsorship[edit]

Previous sponsorship includes:

  • A sponsor of NHL's Russian ice hockey superstar Alexander Ovechkin, the first US$100 million deal in NHL history [18]
  • Affiliated with New York-based record label Open Bar Music [19]
  • A sponsor of the Miami Winter Music Conference (WMC) 2007 [20]
  • The official sponsor of the Formula 1 GPC Canada 2007/2008
  • A sponsor of freestyle skiers and skate borders such as Toebee Parkhurst
  • The official drink of the internationally syndicated and streamed internet radio station, SSRadioUK [21]
  • An official sponsor of Cyber Evolution (CEVO) – the largest online gaming league in the United States [22]
  • A long-term sponsor of leading Formula One news website F1i.com

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hype Energy Drink Distributors". Hype.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  2. ^ R. J. Barry Cox (1999-01-29). "R. Cox: Executive Profile & Biography - Businessweek". Investing.businessweek.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  3. ^ "Bertrand Gachot Profile - Drivers - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  4. ^ "Hype Energy drink Review". Edjunkie.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  5. ^ "Hype MFP Energy Drink Review - Energy Drink Ratings and Reviews". Energy-drink-ratings.blogspot.com. 2007-01-28. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  6. ^ "Hype Enlite Energy Drink Review - Energy Drink Ratings and Reviews". Energy-drink-ratings.blogspot.com. 2007-11-20. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  7. ^ "Hype energy shot drink review". Edjunkie.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  8. ^ "Energy drinks from Hype Energy". Hype.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  9. ^ "Bevnet". Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  10. ^ "The ultimate F1 dream > F1 News >". Grandprix.com. 1995-07-31. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  11. ^ "Arrows to get lots of Hype? > F1 News >". Grandprix.com. 1995-09-11. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  12. ^ http://www.businesscoot.com/uk-energy-drink-market-197/
  13. ^ http://cdn.worldheritage.org/articles/Hype_Energy
  14. ^ "Barry Cox Obituary: View Barry Cox's Obituary by The Times". Announcements.thetimes.co.uk. 2010-01-12. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  15. ^ "F1 News - Grandprix.com > GP Encyclopedia > Sponsors > History of sponsorship in Formula 1". Grandprix.com. 2007-03-10. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  16. ^ a b "Formula One sponsorship liveries - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia". En.wikipedia.org. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  17. ^ "Bertrand Gachot | | F1 Driver Profile | ESPN F1". En.espnf1.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  18. ^ Contact the author. "The world’s 23rd most marketable athlete - Alex Ovechkin - Notes & Insights - SportsPro Media sports blog". SportsPro Media. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  19. ^ "DJ/Producer - John Hobbs van Synergy Artists op Myspace". Myspace.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  20. ^ "Winter Music Conference 2013 - WMC 2013". Wintermusicconference.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  21. ^ "SSRadio Hard and Fast - Progressive House, Techno Trance Music Radio and Hard House Mixes". Hard.ssradiouk.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  22. ^ "Empowering Gamers, Growing Communities". CEVO. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 

External links[edit]