I'll Fly Away

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from I'll Fly Away (hymn))
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see I'll Fly Away (disambiguation).
"I'll Fly Away"
Music: Albert E. Brumley
Words: Albert E. Brumley
Published 1932
Language English
Meter 9.4.9.4
Melody name I'LL FLY AWAY

"I'll Fly Away", is a hymn written in 1929 by Albert E. Brumley and published in 1932 by the Hartford Music company in a collection titled Wonderful Message.[1][2] Brumley's writing was influenced in part by an older secular ballad.

"I'll Fly Away" has been called the most recorded gospel song,[1][2] and it is frequently used in worship services by Baptists, Pentecostals, Nazarenes, the Churches of Christ and many Methodists.[3] It appears in many hymnals where it is listed under the topics of eternal life, heaven and acceptance. It is a standard song at bluegrass jam sessions and is often performed at funerals.

History[edit]

Albert E. Brumley has been described as the "pre-eminent gospel songwriter" of the 20th century with over 600 published songs.[3] Other titles of his include "Jesus, Hold My Hand", "Turn Your Radio On", "I'll Meet You in the Morning", and "This World Is Not My Home". According to interviews, Brumley came up with the idea for the song while picking cotton on his father's farm in Rock Island, Oklahoma.[1][3] Brumley says that as he worked he was "humming the old ballad that went like this: 'If I had the wings of an angel, over these prison walls I would fly,' and suddenly it dawned on me that I could use this plot for a gospel-type song."[1] The song Brumley described appears to be "The Prisoner's Song"[4] It was an additional three years later until Brumley worked out the rest of the song, paraphrasing one line from the secular ballad to read, "Like a bird from prison bars has flown" using prison as an analogy for earthly life.[1] Brumley has stated, "When I wrote it, I had no idea that it would become so universally popular."[1]

Recordings[edit]

The Selah Jubilee Singers[edit]

"I'll Fly Away"
Single by Selah Jubilee Singers
Released ?
Format 78 rpm
Recorded February 21, 1941
Genre gospel
Label Decca 7831 (reissued Document DOCD 5499)[5][6]

One of the earliest recordings of "I'll Fly Away" was made by the Selah Jubilee Singers in February 1941 for Decca Records. The group was founded around 1927 by Thermon Ruth, a disc jockey at radio station WOR in Brooklyn New York.[5]

  • [Released date?] - Decca 7831 - "Hide me in thy Bosom"/"I'll Fly Away"[7]

James and Martha Carson[edit]

"I'll Fly Away"
Single by James and Martha Carson
Released 1951
Format Short Play
Recorded ?
Genre gospel
Label Capitol 1415

James and Martha Carson, also known as the "Barn Dance Sweethearts" released their first recordings on White Church in 1947 and later signed with Capitol in 1949. They recorded 22 numbers for Capitol and "I'll Fly Away" is one of a half-dozen that "did well" for them.[8]

  • 1951 - Capitol 1415 - "I'll Fly Away"/"We Will Rise and Shine"[9]

The Chuck Wagon Gang[edit]

"I'll Fly Away"
Single by Chuck Wagon Gang
Released 1950(?)[10]
Format 78 rpm
Recorded December 16, 1948[11]
Genre gospel
Label Columbia

The Chuck Wagon Gang's 1948 recording of "I'll Fly Away" for Columbia sold over one-million copies and ranks among the top selling gospel records of all-time,[12] and is listed among the top selling songs of the 1940s in general.[13] In 1950, Billboard reported that American disc jockeys voted the Chuck Wagon Gang "18th most popular of all singing groups in the nation," considering all music genres, and the third most popular recording artist for Columbia.[11]

In a history given by the current Chuck Wagon Gang, their recording of "I'll Fly Away" is described as the "first commercially licensed" release."[11] Their recording appears to have had two releases on Columbia, first as a B-side in 1949, then as an A-side in 1950.

  • 1949 - Columbia 20599 - "Dream Boat"/"I'll Fly Away"[10]
  • 1950 - Columbia 20701 - "I'll Fly Away"/"Looking for a City"[10]

The Kossoy Sisters[edit]

In 1956, the Kossoy Sisters included "I'll Fly Away" on the album, Bowling Green, which featured instrumental backing by Erik Darling. The Kossoys, actually twin sisters Irene Saletan and Ellen Christenson, are known for their close harmony singing, which is exemplified on this track. Their recording was introduced to a wider audience when it was included in the 2000 Coen Brothers film, O Brother, Where Art Thou?.[14][15]

George Jones[edit]

George Jones recorded an energetic version on his classic 1965 gospel LP Old Brush Arbors.

Alison Krauss and Gillian Welch[edit]

There have been numerous recordings of "I'll Fly Away" since its inclusion in the 2000 film O Brother Where Art Thou?, although a vintage recording was used in the film itself, (see Kossoy Sisters above), a contemporary recording by Alison Krauss and Gillian Welch was chosen for the O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack. The spare recording, produced by T-Bone Burnett, features Welch on lead vocals with Krauss singing harmony. Their voices are accompanied by Mike Compton on mandolin and Chris Sharp on guitar. The soundtrack sold over eight million copies, reached the top position on at least four of Billboard's album charts, and was named Album of the Year and Best Soundtrack album at the 44th Grammy Awards in February 2002.[16][17]

Alison Krauss and Gillian Welch performed the song again for a May 24, 2000 concert at the Ryman Auditorium that featured many of the artists from the O Brother soundtrack. Film from the concert was used to create the 2000 documentary, Down from the Mountain. Krauss and Welch's live performance is included as the final track on the Down from the Mountain soundtrack album, which sold over 500,000 copies, won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Folk Album, and appeared on several of Billboard's charts.[18][19]

Both the studio and live performances by Krauss and Welch were popular among folk music disk jockeys. The two recordings were ranked at No. 7 and No. 47 respectively on the Top Songs of 2001 Folk Radio airplay chart.[20]

Jars of Clay[edit]

The Christian rock band Jars of Clay have recorded "I'll Fly Away" twice, first, for the 2004 various artists compilation album, WOW Worship: Red and again for their own 2005 album, Redemption Songs. The latter features guest vocals by Sarah Kelly. Redemption Songs reached No. 1 on Billboard's Top Christian Albums chart and No. 71 on the Billboard 200.[21] Their recording of the song was popular enough on Christian radio to be placed at No. 1 on a list of the Top Songs of 2005 by at least one station.[22]

Alan Jackson[edit]

Alan Jackson included "I'll Fly Away" on his first ever gospel album, Precious Memories (2006). He offers an up-tempo performance with guitar and piano solos. Jackson's album sold over 1 million copies and reached the top position on Billboard's charts for Top Country Albums and Top Christian Albums, as well as No. 4 on the Billboard 200.[23][24]

List of recordings[edit]

This will likely always be an incomplete list. The listings at Allmusic are in excess of 1000 entries.[25]

Sampling lawsuit[edit]

"I'll Fly Away" was sampled without permission for the Grammy-winning song "I'll Be Missing You" recorded in 1997 by Puff Daddy and Faith Evans. In 2000, the songwriter's heirs, Albert E. Brumley & Sons, Inc. settled a copyright infringement suit filed against Arista Records, Faith Evans, Illegal Songs Inc., Chyna Baby Music, Janice Combs Publishing Inc., Magnetic Publishing Ltd. and Bad Boy Entertainment. In the settlement, the defendants acknowledged that Albert E. Brumley & Sons were the rightful copyright owners of "I'll Fly Away" and compensated them for an undisclosed amount.[31]

In print[edit]

Hymnals and other church texts[edit]

  • African American Heritage Hymnal (#601)[32]
  • Baptist Hymnal, 2008 (#601)[33]
  • Celebration Hymnal (#779)[34]
  • The Faith We Sing (#2282)[35]
  • The New National Baptist Hymnal (#432), 1977[36]
  • Sing the Faith: New Hymns for Presbyterians (#2282)[37]

Other songbooks[edit]

  • Wonderful Message, Hartford Music Company, 1932 [This is the original publication of the song]
  • The Bluegrass Picker's Tune Book, Mel Bay Publications, 2006

Occurrences in film and television[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Richard Matteson, Jr., The Bluegrass Picker's Tune Book, Mel Bay Publications, 2006 (accessed at google books on 04-03-2011)
  2. ^ a b Barnett, David (2006), Honky Tonks, Hymns, and the Blues, retrieved 2009-10-30 
  3. ^ a b c Joe Edwards, 'I'll Fly Away' hymn classic, Associated Press/Kentucky New Era, Mar 13 1987, page 4D
  4. ^ W.K. McNeil, Encyclopeida of American Gospel Music, Routlage, 2005, page 54
  5. ^ a b c Dixon, Robert M. W. Blues and Gospel Records: 1890-1943, Oxford University Press (1997), page 785 - ISBN 0-19-816239-1
  6. ^ Allan F. Moore, The Cambridge companion to blues and gospel music, Cambridge University Press, 2002, p.192
  7. ^ Decca 7500-8000 series Numerical Listing, THE ONLINE DISCOGRAPHICAL PROJECT
  8. ^ W. K. McNeil, Encyclopedia of American gospel music, p.66
  9. ^ James and Martha Carson Discographie, Rocky Productions, June 14, 2005
  10. ^ a b c Chuck Wagon Gang: Discographie, Rocky Productions, Oct 23, 2010
  11. ^ a b c History: The Chuck Wagon Gang (official web site of the band's current incarnation)
  12. ^ Bil Carpenter, Uncloudy days: the gospel music encyclopeida, 2005 [numbers referenced are based on RIAA figures]
  13. ^ Songs of the Century: The Swing Era / The War Years (1940-1950)
  14. ^ Jon Johnson, O Kossoy Sisters, where art thou been?, Country Standard Time, January 2003
  15. ^ Dan Pashman, What's the Best "I'll Fly Away" Ever?, The Bryant Park Project:NPR, June 17, 2008
  16. ^ RIAA database (a search shows O Brother, Where Art Thou? was certified 8XMulti Platinum on 10/10/2007, accessed 04/06/2011)
  17. ^ O Brother, Where Art Thou? charts and Awards at Allmusic.com
  18. ^ RIAA database (a search shows Down from the Mountain was certified Gold on 01/23/2003, accessed 04/06/2011)
  19. ^ Down from the Mountain charts and Awards at Allmusic.com
  20. ^ Richard Gillmann, Top Songs of 2001, folkrado.org (accessed 04/06/2011)
  21. ^ Redemption Songs charts and awards at Allmusic.com
  22. ^ "Top Songs of 2005 - US Singles Charts". AlaskaJim.com. Retrieved April 3, 2011. 
  23. ^ RIAA database (a search shows Precious Memories was certified Platinum on 08/03/2006, accessed 04/06/2011)
  24. ^ Precious Memories charts and awards at Allmusic.com
  25. ^ Search results for "I'll Fly Away" at Allmusic.com
  26. ^ Grovin' Time at Smithsonian Folkways
  27. ^ Somebody Bigger Than You and I at Allmusic.com
  28. ^ D.C. Blues: Library of Congress Recordings, Vol. 2 at Allmusic.com
  29. ^ [1] at Amazon.com
  30. ^ [2] at Amazon.com
  31. ^ Publisher settles copyright lawsuit, Nashville Business Journal, September 26, 2000
  32. ^ "African American Heritage Hymnal 601. Some glad morning when this life is o'er". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 2012-02-24. 
  33. ^ "Baptist Hymnal 2008 601. Some glad morning when this life is o'er". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 2012-02-24. 
  34. ^ "Celebration Hymnal 779. Some glad morning when this life is o'er, I'll fly away;". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 2012-02-24. 
  35. ^ "The Faith We Sing 2282. Some glad morning when this life is o'er". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 2012-02-24. 
  36. ^ "The New National Baptist Hymnal 432. Some glad morning when this life is o'er". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 2012-02-24. 
  37. ^ "Sing the Faith 2282. Some glad morning when this life is o'er". Hymnary.org. Retrieved 2012-02-24. 
  38. ^ a b Song Catalog - TV at brumleymusic.com
  39. ^ a b c Song Catalog - movies at brumleymusic.com
  40. ^ Allison Keyes, The Sounds And Soul Of Treme, Tell Me More, NPR, August 26, 2010