The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

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The Institutes for The Achievement of Human Potential (IAHP), teaches and provides literature on a treatment program which it promotes as improving the health and neurological development of "brain injured" and normal children.[1] The headquarters is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. There are offices and programs offered in several other countries including Japan, Italy, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, Singapore, Norway, China, Australia and India.[1]

Despite being criticized by skeptics, The Institutes programs are widely praised by medical professionals who follow personalized approaches to treatment and education. “Upon reflection, I recognize that the program at the Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential is the quintessential functional neurology program. It shares all the concepts that underlie the principles of the Institute for Functional Medicine. Within its formalization and therapies may lie the solution to autism.” - Jeffrey Bland, Ph.D. Alternative Therapies Nov 2008 Vol 14 Number 6.

History[edit]

The IAHP website gives a founding date of 1955 and lists only Glenn Doman as founder. The Institutes for The Achievement of Human Potential (IAHP, also known as "The Institutes") is located in Wyndmoor, Pa., a suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1] Glenn Doman (a physical therapist), together with Carl Delacato (an educational psychologist), developed an approach to treating children with brain injury, published in 1960 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).[2] Their work drew heavily on the ideas of Temple Fay (a neurophysiologist), who was head of the Department of Neurosurgery at Temple University Medical School and president of the Philadelphia Neurological Society.[3]

Glenn Doman published the book What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child in 1974, which describes the early ideas and techniques first used by IAHP. The subtitle of the book or your Brain-damaged, Mentally Retarded, Mentally Deficient, Cerebral-Palsied, Epileptic, Autistic, Athetoid, Hyperactive, Attention Deficit Disordered, Developmentally Delayed, Down’s Child lists the many conditions the author regards as being encompassed by "brain injured" – the term favoured by IAHP.[4] According to a 2007 WPVI television news report the IAHP uses the word "hurt" to describe the children they see "with all kinds of brain injuries and conditions, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, epilepsy, Down's syndrome, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism." Since 1964, Glenn Doman (later also Janet and Douglas Doman) has published a number of books in the "Gentle Revolution Series", a line of books for parents of normal children, covering topics such as reading, math, intelligence, and swimming.[5][6][7][8][non-primary source needed] Since 1980 Janet Doman has been director of IAHP. Programs for "well children" are a significant aspect of the IAHP's promotional material, literature and web site.

Programs[edit]

Programs for brain-injured children[edit]

The Programs for brain-injured children offered by IAHP include:


Home study:This program consists of learning how to help a child at home by reading the books that have been written by The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential for that specific purpose.

Courses for parents.

Appointments: Evaluation, diagnosis and a home-treatment program.

Support: The Intensive Treatment Program

Programs for well children[edit]

Nurture Your Smart Newborn

How To Multiply Your Baby's Intelligence

How To Teach Your Baby To Read

How To Teach Your Baby Mathematics

How To Give Your Baby Encyclopedic Knowledge

How To Teach Your Baby To Swim

Fit Baby, Smart Baby, Your Baby

Scientific evaluation[edit]

Despite scientific research supporting the effectiveness of sensory stimulation, and the continual publication of results by IAHP since 1973, The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Children With Disabilities issued warnings regarding patterning, just one of many of IAHP therapies for brain injured children, as early as 1968[9] and repeated in 1982.[10] Their latest cautionary policy statement was in 1999, and 2010.[11]

A number of other organizations historically, in the 1960s, issued cautionary statements about claims for efficacy of this therapy. These include the United Cerebral Palsy Association of Texas,[12] the Canadian Association for Retarded Children[13] the executive board of the American Academy of Neurology,[14] and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.[15] Hornby et al. call R.A. Cummins 1988 book The Neurologically Impaired-child: Doman-Delacato Techniques Reappraised (Croom Helm, ISBN 9780709948599), "The most comprehensive analysis of the rationale and effectiveness of the Doman-Delacato programme to date" and state Cummins uses neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to demonstrate that there is no sound scientific basis for the techniques used by the IAHP and concludes any benefit is likely due to increased activity and attention. Hornby et al. conclude, "It is now clear that the only results supporting the effectiveness of the programme come from a handful of early, poorly controlled studies." Kavale and Mostert and others also identified serious problems with the early research on the IAHP program.

Martin Robards also cites widespread criticism in his book Running a Team for Disabled Children and Their Families but concedes that Doman and Delacato caused pediatricians and therapists to recognize that early intervention programs are needed.[16]

IAHP continues scientific research and publication of results in The IN-Report and in peer-reviewed journals. Recently in 2006, a retrospective study of 21 children by the IAHP and others of children with cortical visual impairment found significant improvement after use of the program.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About Us". iahp.org. The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential. 
  2. ^ Doman, R.J.; Spitz, E.B.; Zucman, E.; Delacato, C.H. et al. (1960). "Children with severe brain injuries. Neurological organization in terms of mobility". JAMA 174: 257–62. doi:10.1001/jama.1960.03030030037007. PMID 13817361. 
  3. ^ "Temple Fay, MD". The Society of Neurological Surgeons. 
  4. ^ Doman, Glenn (2005) [1974]. What To Do About Your Brain-injured Child (Revised ed.). Square One. ISBN 0757001866. 
  5. ^ Doman, Glenn; Doman, Janet (2005) [1964]. How To Teach Your Baby To Read (Revised ed.). Square One. ISBN 0757001858. 
  6. ^ Doman, Glenn J.; Doman, Janet (2005) [1983]. How To Multiply Your Baby's Intelligence (Revised ed.). Square One. ISBN 0757001831. 
  7. ^ Doman, Glenn; Doman, Janet (2005) [1979]. How To Teach Your Baby Math (Revised ed.). Square One. ISBN 075700184X. 
  8. ^ Doman, Douglas (2006). How to Teach Your Baby to Swim: From Birth to Age Six. Square One. ISBN 075700198X. 
  9. ^ American Academy of Pediatrics (June 1, 1968 (suppl)). "Doman-Delacato treatment of neurologically handicapped children". AAP Newsletter. 
  10. ^ American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Children With Disabilities (1982). "The Doman-Delacato treatment of neurologically handicapped children". Pediatrics 70: 810–2. PMID 6182521. 
  11. ^ American Academy of Pediatrics (2010). "AAP publications reaffirmed and retired". Pediatrics (Policy Statement) 126 (4): e994. doi:10.1542/peds.2010-2212. 
  12. ^ United Cerebral Palsy Association of Texas (nd), The Doman-Delacato Treatment of Neurologically Handicapped Children (information bulletin), Austin, TX: United Cerebral Palsy Association of Texas. 
  13. ^ Canadian Association for Retarded Children (Fall 1965). "Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential". Ment Retard: 27–8. 
  14. ^ American Academy of Neurology and American Academy of Pediatrics Joint Executive Board Statement (1967). "The Doman-Delacato treatment of neurologically handicapped children". Neurology 17: 637. 
  15. ^ American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (1968). "Doman-Delacato treatment of neurologically handicapped children". Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 49: 183–6. PMID 4296733. 
  16. ^ Robards, Martin F. (1994). Running a Team for Disabled Children and Their Families. Cambridge University Press. p. 83. ISBN 0901260991. 
  17. ^ Malkowicz, D.E.; Myers, G.; Leisman, G. (2006). "Rehabilitation of cortical visual impairment in children". Int J Neurosci 116 (9): 1015–33. doi:10.1080/00207450600553505. PMID 16861165. 

Further reading[edit]

Bratt, Berneen (1989). No Time for Jello: One Family's Experiences with the Doman-Delacato Patterning Program. Brookline. ISBN 9780914797562. 

External links[edit]