INSAT-2DT

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Arabsat-1C → INSAT-2DT
Mission type Communication
Operator ArabsatISRO
COSPAR ID 1992-010B
Mission duration 7 years (planned)
12¾ years (achieved)
Spacecraft properties
Bus Spacebus 100
Manufacturer Aérospatiale
Launch mass 1,360 kilograms (3,000 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date 26 February 1992, 23:58:10 (1992-02-26UTC23:58:10Z) UTC
Rocket Ariane 44L
Launch site Kourou ELA-2
Contractor Arianespace
End of mission
Disposal Decommissioned
Deactivated October 2004 (2004-11)
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric
Regime Geostationary
Longitude 31° East
55° East
82.5° East
Period 24 hours
Transponders
Band 2 E/F-band
25 G/H-Band

INSAT-2DT, previously Arabsat-1C and also known as INSAT-2R, was a Saudi Arabian and subsequently Indian communications satellite which was operated initially by Arabsat, and then by the Indian Space Research Organisation.

Launch and Arabsat service[edit]

Launched in 1992 as Arabsat-1C, it was operated at 31° East longitude in geostationary orbit,[1] from where it was used to provide communication services to the Arab States. It was constructed by Aérospatiale, based on the Spacebus 100 satellite bus, and carried two NATO E/F-band (IEEE S band) and 25 NATO G/H-Band (IEEE C band) transponders. At launch, it had a mass of 1,170 kilograms (2,580 lb), and an expected operational lifespan of seven years.[2]

It was launched by Arianespace using an Ariane 4 rocket in the 44L configuration, flying from ELA-2 at the Guiana Space Centre in Kourou. The launch took place at 22:58:10 GMT on 26 February 1992.[3] It was the final Spacebus 100 satellite to be launched.

ISRO operations[edit]

In November 1997, Arabsat-1C was sold to ISRO as INSAT-2DT.[4] In December, it was moved to a new slot at 55°E longitude, where it replaced the INSAT-2D satellite which had failed in orbit.[5] It remained at 55°E until August 2003, when it was moved to 85.2°E, arriving in November.[6] By the time of its departure from 55°E, its orbital inclination had increased somewhat.

INSAT-2DT remained at 85.2°E until October 2004, when it was retired from service and placed into a graveyard orbit.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wade, Mark. "Arabsat". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  2. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "Arabsat 1A, 1B, 1C / Insat 2DT". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  3. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  4. ^ "Arabsat 1C". TSE. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  5. ^ "INSAT-2D". TSE. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  6. ^ a b "INSAT-2R". TSE. Retrieved 2009-07-05.