Anguthimri language

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Not to be confused with Awngthim language.
Anguthimri
Native to Australia
Region Cape York Peninsula, Queensland
Extinct (date missing)
Dialects
Nggerikudi (Yupungati)
Tjungundji
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Variously:
aid – Alngith
lnj – Linngithigh
awg – Mpakwithi (Anguthimri proper)
Glottolog angu1240  (Anguthimri)[1]
leni1237  (Leningitij–Alngith)[2]
tyan1235  (Awngtim–Ntrangit)[3]
AIATSIS[4] Y20 Anguthimri, Y26 Linngithigh, Y19 Yupangathi, Y14 Tjungundji, Y27 Ndra'ngith, Y32 Alnith
(plus Awngthim)

Anguthimri is an extinct Paman language formerly spoken on the Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia, by the Anguthimri people. It is unknown when it went extinct.[5]

Name[edit]

The name Anguthimri is not a synonym of Awngthim, though due to their similarity they have sometimes been confused.[6]

Phonology[edit]

The two dialects have the same sound inventory.[7]

Consonants[edit]

Peripheral Laminal Apical Glottal
Bilabial Velar Palatal Dental Alveolar Retroflex
Plosive p k c t ʔ
Fricatives β ɣ ð
Nasals m ŋ ɲ n
Post-trilled
Vibrant r
Approximants w j l ɻ

Vowels[edit]

Front Back
High i u
Mid æ o
Low a

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Anguthimri". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Leningitij–Alngith". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Tyanngayt–Mamngayt–Ntrwangayt–Ntrangit". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  4. ^ Anguthimri at the Australian Indigenous Languages Database, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies  (see the info box for additional links)
  5. ^ Ernst Kausen (2005). "Australische Sprachen". 
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Kenneth Hale, 1976, Phonological Developments in Particular Northern Paman Languages, pp.14