I Call Your Name

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"I Call Your Name"
Single by Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas
A-side "Bad to Me"
B-side "I Call Your Name"
Released 26 July 1963
Recorded 26 June 1963 (both sides)
Genre Rock
Label Parlophone R5049
Writer(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) George Martin
"I Call Your Name"
Song by The Beatles
Released 19 June 1964
Recorded 1 March 1964
Genre Rock[1]
Length 2:09
Producer George Martin
Long Tall Sally track listing

"I Call Your Name" is a song written primarily by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney.[2][3]

Overview[edit]

Lennon wrote the song prior to the formation of the Beatles.[2] In 1963, he gave the song to Billy J. Kramer of The Dakotas, another Liverpool band who was signed to Parlophone by George Martin. Kramer released it as the B-side of the single "Bad to Me", another Lennon–McCartney composition.[4]

Lennon was reportedly dissatisfied with the Dakotas' arrangement of his song as well as its position as the single's B-side,[citation needed] so the Beatles recorded their own version.[5] The song features George Harrison playing the Rickenbacker 360/12 guitar, offering the distinctive sound of the famous guitar to the world for the first time.[6]

The opening guitar riff differs slightly between the mono and stereo mixes. The cowbell also starts earlier in the mono mix. It first appeared in the United States on the Capitol Records release The Beatles' Second Album, appearing later in the United Kingdom on the EP Long Tall Sally.[7]

The song's instrumental bridge is the Beatles' first attempt at ska.[4]

The song was never added to the film A Hard Day's Night because director Richard Lester rejected it for sounding too similar to "You Can't Do That," which was recorded five days prior and featured on the non-soundtrack side of the album release.

"I Call Your Name" was re-released in 1988 on the compilation album Past Masters.

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per Ian MacDonald[8]

Covers[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "The Beatles - I Call Your Name - AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Sheff 2000, pp. 169–170.
  3. ^ Miles 1997, p. 46.
  4. ^ a b Lewisohn 1988, p. 41.
  5. ^ Gilliland 1969, show 28, track 5.
  6. ^ Eriksson, Björn (1999). "The Beatles and their Rickenbacker Guitars". Rickbeat.com. Retrieved 27 October 2011. 
  7. ^ Lewisohn 1988, p. 200.
  8. ^ MacDonald 2005, p. 114.
  9. ^ "Speech at Monterey". Casselliot.com. 20 October 2009. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 
  10. ^ Gilliland 1969, show 36, track 5.

References[edit]