I Love You to Death

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I Love You to Death
Lovedeath.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Lawrence Kasdan
Produced by Jeffrey Lurie
Written by John Kostmayer
Starring Kevin Kline
Tracey Ullman
Joan Plowright
River Phoenix
William Hurt
Keanu Reeves
Music by James Horner
Cinematography Owen Roizman
Edited by Anne V. Coates
Distributed by TriStar Pictures
Release date(s)
  • April 6, 1990 (1990-04-06)
Running time 96 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $16,186,793

I Love You to Death is a 1990 American dark comedy film directed by Lawrence Kasdan. It is loosely based on an attempted murder that happened in 1984, in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where Frances Toto repeatedly tried to kill her husband, Anthony.[1] She spent four years in prison for attempted murder.

Plot[edit]

Joey Boca (Kevin Kline) is the owner of a pizza parlor located in Tacoma, Washington, and has been married to Rosalie (Tracey Ullman) for years. Rosalie is horrified to discover that Joey is a womanizer and has been cheating on her for a long time.

Rosalie does not want to allow Joey the pleasure of having every woman he wants, so she refuses divorce. Taking extreme measures, she enlists the help of her mother (Joan Plowright), and her young co-worker Devo (River Phoenix), who's secretly in love with her, to kill Joey in order to put an end to his infidelity. They also hire two incompetent, perpetually stoned hit-men (William Hurt and Keanu Reeves).

However, Joey proves impossible to kill. Despite multiple attempts to poison, shoot, and bludgeon Joey to death, he remains blissfully unaware that he is being targeted.

Cast[edit]

Kline had requested that his wife, Phoebe Cates, take a small role in the film. She appeared in the bar/disco scene as the girl Joey picks up at the bar. She did this as an uncredited appearance and as a favor to her husband. She was also filming Drop Dead Fred at the time of her cameo in I Love You to Death which is why her hair looks exactly the same in both films.

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 56% based on reviews from 18 critics.[2]

Roger Ebert describes the film as "an actor's dream" but isn't quite so sure it is a dream film for an audience. He praises Ullman for her performance, noting it is all the more effective against the overtly comic performance of Kline. Ebert suggests Kasdan was attracted to the script because it seems almost impossible to direct, and although he is not sure it succeeds, it is certainly not boring.[3]

Box office[edit]

It grossed $4 million on its opening weekend. It went on to make $16 million in North America.[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]