I Prefer the Moonlight

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I Prefer The Moonlight
Studio album by Kenny Rogers
Released 1987
Recorded 1987
Genre Country
Length 37:15
Label RCA Nashville
Producer Brown Bannister, Richard Landis, Rob Galbraith, Larry Butler, Brent Maher
Kenny Rogers chronology
They Don't Make Them Like They Used To
(1986)
I Prefer the Moonlight
(1987)
Greatest Hits
(1988)

I Prefer the Moonlight is the sixteenth studio album by country superstar Kenny Rogers. It did respectably well for his current status in the industry to date, placing #18 on the charts.[1] Though the album only reached #163 in the Billboard 200, the success in the country market was enough for it to go gold. It contained two top five hit singles: the title cut and the grammy-winning duet with Ronnie Milsap, "Make No Mistake, She's Mine". The album was Rogers' last studio album for RCA Nashville.

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 2.5/5 stars link

Track listing[edit]

  1. "I Prefer the Moonlight" (Gary Chapman, Mark Wright) (5:10)
  2. "Now and Forever" (Wayne Kirkpatrick, Keith Thomas) (4:09)
  3. "We're Doin' Alright" (Reed Nielsen) (4:00)
  4. "Make No Mistake, She's Mine" (With Ronnie Milsap) (Kim Carnes) (3:58)
  5. "One More Day" (John Barlow Jarvis, Nielsen) (2:57)
  6. "She's Ready for Someone to Love Her" (Charlie Black, Jerry Gillespie, Tommy Rocco) (2:51)
  7. "I Don't Call Him Daddy" (Nielsen) (4:08)
  8. "The Factory" (Bud McGuire) (3:26)
  9. "We Fell in Love Anyway" (Naomi Martin, Mike Reid) (3:21)
  10. "You Can't Say You Don't Love Me Anymore" (John Jarvis, Bill Lamb) (3:15)

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1987) Peak position
U.S. Billboard Top Country Albums 18
U.S. Billboard 200 163

Singles[edit]

The initial single was the Ronnie Milsap duet "Make No Mistake, She's Mine", which brought Rogers and Milsap to the top of the charts in both the US and Canada. The title cut was released next, and reached #2, a feat equaled to the north as well. "The Factory" was the third single, and reached #6 in the US and #3 in Canada. A final venture was made with "I Don't Call Him Daddy", a lesser hit, peaking at #86.

References[edit]