I Wanna Go Back

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For the song of the same name by Steve Wariner, see Laredo (album).
"I Wanna Go Back"
Single by Billy Satellite
from the album Billy Satellite
B-side "Rockin' Down the Highway"
Released 1984
Format 7" single
Genre Rock
Length 3:52
Label Capitol
Capitol 5409
Writer(s) Danny Chauncey, Monty Byrom, Ira Walker
Producer(s) Don Gehman
Billy Satellite singles chronology
"Satisfy Me"
(1984)
"I Wanna Go Back"
(1984)
Audio sample
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"I Wanna Go Back"
Single by Eddie Money
from the album Can't Hold Back
B-side "Broken Down"
Released 1986
Format 7" single
Genre Rock, pop rock, pop, new wave
Length 3:59
Label Columbia
Columbia 38-06569
Eddie Money singles chronology
"Take Me Home Tonight"
(1986)
"I Wanna Go Back"
(1986)
"Endless Nights"
(1987)
Audio sample
file info · help

"I Wanna Go Back" is a 1984 song by American rock band Billy Satellite, written by band members Monty Byrom, Danny Chauncey, and Ira Walker, that achieved major popularity when recorded by Eddie Money in 1986. Another version was recorded by former Santana/Journey keyboardist/singer Gregg Rolie for his self-titled 1985 debut solo album.

Billy Satellite version[edit]

Released in 1984 as the band's debut single, it reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart on December 8, 1984, charting for three weeks and peaking at number 78. The mid-tempo song is reliant on synthesizers but contains a short guitar solo in the bridge and some guitar in the outro. The music video begins with the members of Billy Satellite driving a jeep to Alameda, California to the site of a previous live show; the latter portion features the band playing in a bar there.

Eddie Money version[edit]

American rock singer Eddie Money covered the song on his 1986 album Can't Hold Back, and it was released as the follow-up single to the top-ten hit "Take Me Home Tonight". It reached number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number three on the Album Rock Tracks chart in early 1987. Money's version, which Allmusic's Mike DeGagne says has "sincere, semi-ballad charm,"[1] still relies heavily on synthesizers but includes more guitar and adds saxophone in the intro, bridge, and outro. The music video to his version features Money revisiting a high school interspersed with him and his band playing before a concert audience.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mike DeGagne. Review of Eddie Money's Can't Hold Back. Allmusic. Retrieved 15 April 2010.