Ian McFarlane

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For those of a similar name, see Ian Macfarlane (disambiguation).
Ian McFarlane
Born 1959 (age 54–55)
Australia
Occupation Journalist, editor, author
Subject Rock music, Pop music
Notable works The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop

Ian McFarlane (born 1959) is an Australian music journalist, music historian and author, whose best known publication is the The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop (1999). As a journalist he started in 1984 with Juke, a rock music newspaper. During the early 1990s he worked for Roadrunner Records while he published a music guide, The Australian New Music Record Guide Volume 1: 1976–1980 (1992). He followed with two fanzines, Freedom Train and Prehistoric Sounds, both issued during 1994 to 1996. McFarlane's The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop is described by the Australian Music Guide as "the most exhaustive and wide-ranging encyclopedia of Australian music from the 1950s onwards". Subsequently he was a writer for The Australian and worked for Raven Records, a reissue specialist label, preparing compilations, writing liner notes and providing research. He fulfilled a similar role at Aztec Music from 2004 to March 2012. From July 2013 he has been a contributor to Addicted to Noise, writing a column.

Biography[edit]

Ian McFarlane was born in 1959,[1] and started as a freelance music journalist in 1984 writing for Melbourne-based newspaper, Juke,[2] and for The Edge and From the Vault.[3] During the late 1980s to early 1990s he was a writer with Sydney music magazine Hot Metal and from 1992–1994 worked for Roadrunner Records (Australia). In 1992 MacFarlane published his first music guide, The Australian New Music Record Guide Volume 1: 1976–1980, which provided a chronological list and brief description of all independent records released by Australian bands in Australia, between 1976 and 1980, together with a year-by-year summary of how local independent music developed during that time. This series however did not progress beyond Volume 1, although he did commence Volume 2 - 1981-1983, which was intended to be published at the end of 1994.

In 1994 he wrote and edited the fanzine, Freedom Train,[4] published by Third Stone Press, which covered Australian progressive rock between the 1970s and the 1990s.[5] Issue 1 of Prehistoric Sounds comprised a series of articles, interviews and discographies of bands, including Spectrum, Ariel, Madder Lake, The Masters Apprentices and Kahvas Jute.[5] Issue 2 covered bands and musicians including Chain, Phil Manning, Taman Shud, Sebastian Hardie, Healing Force and Galadriel.[5] At the same time he also wrote and edited Prehistoric Sounds,[4] published by Dark City Press, which dealt with Australian indie rock from the 1970s and 1980s.[3][5] Issue 1 contained articles on The Saints, Models, The Psycho-Surgeons, The Lipstick Killers, The Thought Criminals and Au-Go-Go Records, together with interviews with Ed Kuepper, Sean Kelly and Mark Taylor. Issue 2 included articles on The Scientists, The Birthday Party, Citadel Records and The Laughing Clowns and interviews with Kim Salmon, Rowland S. Howard and Ed Kuepper. Issue 3 had articles on Radio Birdman, The Visitors, New Race, Deniz Tek, New Christs, Fun Things and The Hitmen, as well as interviews with Rob Younger and Brad Shepherd. Issue 4, which was also the final issue, contained articles on Beasts Of Bourbon, Died Pretty, The Moodists and Greasy Pop Records, as well as interviews with Tex Perkins, Brett Myers, Ron Peno, Dave Graney and Clare Moore.

McFarlane wrote The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop in December 1999.[1][3] His magnum opus is described by the Australian Music Guide as "the most exhaustive and wide-ranging encyclopedia of Australian music from the 1950s onwards".[6] Fellow music journalist, Debbie Kruger, describes it as "brilliantly researched, unfailingly thorough, never boring. Essential".[7]

From the late 1990s he was a writer for The Australian.[3] He worked for Raven Records, a reissue specialist label, preparing compilations, writing liner notes and providing research.[8][9] He wrote most of the liner notes for Aztec Music releases from its establishment in 2004 to its closure in March 2012.[10][11] McFarlane detailed the importance of Aztec Music's reissues after decades of recovery from a mid-1970s punk-inspired backlash "those punk bands came in and said 'Anything pre-1976 is crap' ... That carried over well into the '80s and '90s' ... It took a long time for people to get over that post-'76 thing of 'No, we don't care about our heritage'".[10]

In June 2008 The Age newspaper commemorated 50 years of Australian rock 'n' roll (the anniversary of the release of Johnny O'Keefe's "Wild One") by selecting the Top 50 Australian Albums, with McFarlane selected as one of the industry judges.[12][13][14] McFarlane chose Stoneage Romeos (1984) by Hoodoo Gurus as his favourite "reckless abandon and sheer fun ... capturing the essence of perfect power pop and wild garage punk in 11 far-out songs".[13] From July 2013 he has been a contributor to Addicted to Noise, writing a column.[15]

Bibliography[edit]

  • McFarlane, Ian (1992). The Australian New Music Record Guide Volume 1: 1976–1980. Golden Square, Vic.: Moonlight Publishing. ISBN 978-0-646-13267-9. 
  • McFarlane, Ian (1994). "Vol. 1 Issue 1". Freedom Train - Aussie Progressive Rock 1970–1976 (Third Stone Press).  ISSN 1327-6387
  • McFarlane, Ian (1994). "Vol. 1 Issue 1". Prehistoric Sounds - Aussie Indie Music 1976–1989 (Dark City Press). 
  • McFarlane, Ian (1995). "Vol. 1 Issue 2". Freedom Train - Aussie Progressive Rock 1970–1976 (Third Stone Press).  ISSN 1327-6387
  • McFarlane, Ian (1995). "Vol. 1 Issue 2". Prehistoric Sounds - Aussie Indie Music 1976–1990 (Dark City Press). 
  • McFarlane, Ian (1996). "Vol. 1 Issue 3: The Australian Progressive, Hard Rock and Blues Record Guide". Freedom Train - Aussie Progressive Rock 1970–1976 (Third Stone Press).  ISSN 1327-6387
  • McFarlane, Ian (1996). "Vol. 1 Issue 3". Prehistoric Sounds - Aussie Indie Music 1976–1990 (Dark City Press). 
  • McFarlane, Ian (1996). "Vol. 1 Issue 4". Prehistoric Sounds - Aussie Indie Music 1976–1990 (Dark City Press). 
  • McFarlane, Ian (1999). The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-86448-768-2. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "McFarlane, Ian, 1959–". National Library of Australia. Retrieved 2008-11-29. 
  2. ^ McFarlane, Ian (14 July 1984). "Hunters and Collectors, Separate Tables". Juke Magazine. Ed Nimmervoll. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d "The Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop". Allen & Unwin. December 1999. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  4. ^ a b Culnane, Paul (2004). Duncan Kimball, ed. "Recommended Reading – Foffle". Milesago: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964–1975. Ice Productions. Archived from the original on 25 November 2010. Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Other Books". Moonlight. Archived from the original on 27 July 2009. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "Australian Music Books". TheMusic. March 2004. p. 4. Archived from the original on 28 February 2005. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  7. ^ Kruger, Debbie. "Essential Reading". Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  8. ^ "Ian McFarlane | Credits". Allmusic. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  9. ^ Marchese, Joe (27 February 2014). "Gotcha! Raven Collects Three Essentials from Saxophone Great Tom Scott". The Second Disc. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  10. ^ a b Blackman, Guy (8 August 2008). "National Treasures". The Age (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 29 November 2008. 
  11. ^ Jones, Nicholas (21 March 2012). "Melbourne Distributor/Label Aztec Music Goes into Receivership". Tone Deaf. Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  12. ^ "The Top 50 Australian Albums of all Time". The Age. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  13. ^ a b "Best of the Best". The Age (Fairfax Media). 27 June 2008. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  14. ^ "The Top 50 Australian Albums of all Time: The Judges". The Age (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  15. ^ Wise, Brian (ed.). "McFarlane Column Archives – Exiled off Main Street". Addicted to Noise. Retrieved 8 April 2014.