Iaret

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Iaret
Queen consort of Egypt
Great Royal Wife
King's Daughter
King's Sister
Iaret-TuthmosisIV.jpg
Queen Iaret and Pharaoh Tuthmosis IV.
Spouse Tuthmosis IV
Full name
Iaret
Dynasty 18th of Egypt
Father Amenhotep II
Mother unknown
Burial Thebes?
Religion Ancient Egyptian religion

Iaret was a Great Royal Wife from the middle of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt.

Family[edit]

An inscription of Iaret: "The Great King's Wife, The King's Daughter, The King's Sister, Iaret"


laret was the daughter of Amunhotep II and wife of Thutmose IV. The transcription of her name is uncertain; it is written with a single cobra, which has a number of possible readings.

Her titles include: King’s Daughter (s3t-niswt), Great King’s Daughter (s3t-niswt-wrt), King’s Sister (snt-niswt), and Great King’s Wife (hmt-niswt-wrt).[1]

There are no known children for Queen Iaret.[2]

Life[edit]

Iaret was the second great royal wife from the reign of Tuthmosis IV. Queen Nefertari is shown in inscriptions dating to the earlier part of the reign. A secondary wife of Tuthmosis IV by the name of Mutemwiya was the mother to the heir of the throne.[2]

Year 7 stela of Thutmose IV from Konosso

Iaret is depicted on a Year 7 stela of Thutmose IV from Konosso.[3] The stela depicts Tuthmosis smiting enemies before the Nubian gods Dedwen and Ha. Queen Iaret is depicted standing behind him.[4]

Iaret's name is also known from inscriptions from the turquoise mines at Serabit el-Khadim in the Sinai from the same year.[5]

It is not known when Iaret died or where she was buried.

References[edit]

  1. ^ W. Grajetzki: Ancient Egyptian Queens: a hieroglyphic dictionary.
  2. ^ a b Dodson, Hilton, The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, 2004
  3. ^ Bryan, Betsy. The Reign of Thutmose IV, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. p.335
  4. ^ Porter and Moss, Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs and Paintings, Volume V. Upper Egypt: Sites. (1st ed.) 2004, pg 254
  5. ^ Bryan, p.336