Iaret

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Iaret
Queen consort of Egypt
Iaret-TuthmosisIV.jpg
Queen Iaret and Pharaoh Tuthmosis IV.
Full name Iaret
Titles Great Royal Wife
King's Daughter
King's Sister
Buried Thebes?
Consort Tuthmosis IV
Dynasty 18th of Egypt
Father Amenhotep II
Mother unknown
Religious beliefs Ancient Egyptian religion

Iaret was a Great Royal Wife from the middle of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt.

Family[edit]

An inscription of Iaret: "The Great King's Wife, The King's Daughter, The King's Sister, Iaret"


laret was the daughter of Amunhotep II and wife of Thutmose IV. The transcription of her name is uncertain; it is written with a single cobra, which has a number of possible readings.

Her titles include: King’s Daughter (s3t-niswt), Great King’s Daughter (s3t-niswt-wrt), King’s Sister (snt-niswt), and Great King’s Wife (hmt-niswt-wrt).[1]

There are no known children for Queen Iaret.[2]

Life[edit]

Iaret was the second great royal wife from the reign of Tuthmosis IV. Queen Nefertari is shown in inscriptions dating to the earlier part of the reign. A secondary wife of Tuthmosis IV by the name of Mutemwiya was the mother to the heir of the throne.[2]

Year 7 stela of Thutmose IV from Konosso

Iaret is depicted on a Year 7 stela of Thutmose IV from Konosso.[3] The stela depicts Tuthmosis smiting enemies before the Nubian gods Dedwen and Ha. Queen Iaret is depicted standing behind him.[4]

Iaret's name is also known from inscriptions from the turquoise mines at Serabit el-Khadim in the Sinai from the same year.[5]

It is not known when Iaret died or where she was buried.

References[edit]

  1. ^ W. Grajetzki: Ancient Egyptian Queens: a hieroglyphic dictionary.
  2. ^ a b Dodson, Hilton, The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, 2004
  3. ^ Bryan, Betsy. The Reign of Thutmose IV, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. p.335
  4. ^ Porter and Moss, Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Statues, Reliefs and Paintings, Volume V. Upper Egypt: Sites. (1st ed.) 2004, pg 254
  5. ^ Bryan, p.336