Ibero-American Summit

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Ibero-American Summit
Cumbre Iberoamericana
Conferência Ibero-americana
Headquarters Spain Madrid, Spain
Official languages
Members
Establishment 1991
Website
http://www.cumbresiberoamericanas.com/

The Ibero-American Summit, formally the Ibero-American Conference of Heads of State and Governments (Spanish: Cumbres Iberoamericanas de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno, Portuguese: Cimeiras (or Cúpulas) Ibero-Americanas de Chefes de Estado e de Governo), is a yearly meeting of the heads of government and state of the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking nations of Europe and the Americas, as members of the Organization of Ibero-American States.

Member states[edit]

The first summit, held in 1991 in Guadalajara, Mexico, was attended by the governments of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Spain, Uruguay and Venezuela. Andorra joined in 2004.[1][2][3] Equatorial Guinea and the Philippines entered in 2009 as "associate members". Puerto Rico has participated sometimes as an associate member, but as it is not a sovereign country it is not allowed to completely join the summits. Belize and East Timor have expressed their interest in joining the summits, although they have not been allowed to join for the moment. All these countries were either Spanish or Portuguese colonies (Belize and the Philippines were Spanish before belonging to the United Kingdom and the United States, respectively). Other former Spanish and Portuguese colonies may join the summits in the future.

Expansion[edit]

Countries participating in the Ibero-American Summit

Applicants

Summits[edit]

Mar del Plata Summit, December 2010
Ibero-American Summit, November 2007, Santiago, Chile.
Ibero-American Summit, 2008 San Salvador, El Salvador.
Summit Place Dates[4]
1st Guadalajara, Mexico July 18–July 19, 1991
2nd Madrid, Spain July 23–July 24, 1992
3rd Salvador, Brazil July 15–July 16, 1993
4th Cartagena, Colombia June 14–June 15, 1994
5th San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina October 16–October 17, 1995
6th Santiago and Viña del Mar, Chile November 13–November 14, 1996
7th Isla Margarita, Venezuela November 8–November 9, 1997
8th Porto, Portugal October 17–October 18, 1998
9th Havana, Cuba November 15–November 16, 1999
10th Panama City, Panama November 17–November 18, 2000
11th Lima, Peru November 17–November 18, 2001
12th Bávaro, Dominican Republic November 15–November 16, 2002
13th Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia November 14–November 15, 2003
14th San José, Costa Rica November 18–November 20, 2004
15th Salamanca, Spain October 14–October 15, 2005
16th Montevideo, Uruguay November 3–November 5, 2006
17th Santiago, Chile November 8–November 10, 2007
18th San Salvador, El Salvador October 29–October 31, 2008
19th Estoril, Portugal November 30–December 1, 2009
20th Mar de Plata, Argentina December 3–December 4, 2010
21st Asunción, Paraguay October 28–October 29, 2011
22nd Cádiz, Spain November 16–November 18, 2012
23rd Panama City, Panama October 16–October 18, 2013
24th Veracruz, Mexico December 8–December 9, 2014

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Países, Cumbres Iberoamericanas de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno. Accessed on line October 22, 2007.
  2. ^ International Relations, Andorran Chamber of Commerce. Accessed on line October 22, 2007.
  3. ^ I Cumbre Iberoamericana de Jefes de Estado y Presidentes de Gobierno, Cumbres y Conferencias Iberoamericanas, Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura. Accessed on line October 22, 2007.
  4. ^ Cumbres Iberoamericanas de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno, Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura. Accessed on line October 22, 2007.

Bibliography[edit]

  • (1992) Primera Cumbre Iberoamericana, Guadalajara, México, 1991: Discursos, Declaración de Guadalajara y documentos. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica. ISBN 968-16-3735-6

External links[edit]